KRI July Newsletter


Kundalini Research Institute The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings Endowment Fund
SUPPORT THE KUNDALINI RESEARCH INSTITUTE & THE LIBRARY OF TEACHINGS Library of Teachings Donation

 

 

 

 


 

A Note From Nirvair Sat Nam. Greetings from New Mexico. We just experienced a wonderful Summer Solstice Sadhana as we celebrated the 50th years of 3HO! It was intense, inspiring, uplifting, and so much fun. Thanks to all of you that said “Sat Nam” to me and visited our KRI® booth in the bazaar. In these large gatherings of Kundalini yogis, I feel relaxed and at home and at the same time very uplifted. I think it is because, for me, when I am at Ram Das Puri, it puts me in touch with my Higher Self and my radiant body naturally expands. At solstice, I can easily share that experience and that cozy freedom with a lot of beautiful, radiant souls that have practiced a lot of Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan® and White Tantric Yoga®. Here is a quotation from Yogi Bhajan talking about the size and dimension of the radiant body. It is so much fun to find new information in the Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings®!

“You have ten bodies but your radiant body solidly effects and acts within a twenty-five mile radius. When the glow of the shield of your radiant body comes to twelve and a half miles, you are just an ordinary human being. When it comes to three miles, you are less than the birds. Every species God has created has a soul - the difference is, how that soul radiates in its surroundings. Some bulbs are 50 watts, some bulbs are 100 watts, and some bulbs are 1000 watts. Their light is different than the other light. All three are bulbs, all run on electricity, and their purpose is to spread light, but the glow is different. There is another thing, [a bulb gives light] because a bulb is made out of a vacuum – a heater may use five thousand watts and it can give the heat but not the glow.” - Yogi Bhajan, April 22, 1997

Your Own InfinityThis year, we introduced two new exciting KRI products at Summer Solstice Sadhana that you will want to know about: “Your Own Infinity” - This is a new curated collection of topically organized Yogi Bhajan quotations, much like the original Teachings of Yogi Bhajan book. The quotations are all about God and the concept of the Divine in a poetic format, which is quite beautiful. “Cold Depression” DVD and thumb drive - This is an important lecture for these times when depression is pandemic, available in the new thumb drive format making it easy to use. All these products are available now for purchase at our online store, The Source. It inspires me to know that a lifetime of servicing and uplifting students is available to you if you are a teacher. If you are considering that path, or you know a student who is considering teaching Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan®, there is still time to register for Level One Teacher Training: Foundations here in New Mexico. Come be with us this August, it is an amazing experience for students and trainers alike. Come expand your radiance! Nirvair Singh Khalsa

 

All the best with blessings, Nirvair Singh Khalsa CEO Kundalini Research Institute

 

 

 

 


 


 

 

Slowing Your Spontaneous Breath Rate: Supportive Research by Sat Bir Singh Khalsa, Ph.D. Yoga Therapy ResearchUnlike animals, the respiratory system is under voluntary control in humans, which has allowed for the development of voluntary breath regulation practices in yoga and other behavioral disciplines such as Tai Chi and Qi Gong. The aim of these breathing practices is to change psychological and physiological state in a beneficial way. Research on slow yogic breathing has demonstrated numerous psychophysiological effects including reduction of autonomic arousal, increase in heart rate variability, improved oxygen and carbon dioxide exchange, and changes in the respiratory system’s sensitivity to these gases. An interesting feature of yoga and slow breathing practice over the long term is the capability of reducing spontaneous breathing frequency, that is the respiratory rate when one is alert and relaxed and not actively trying to control the breath in any way. In the general population, the spontaneous respiratory rate is commonly between 10 and 20 breaths per minute and often involves little movement of the abdomen and is predominantly a shallow, more rapid chest breathing pattern. Slow yogic breathing emphasizes movement of the abdomen, or so-called abdominal or belly breathing, which allows for deeper breaths. It is likely that slower abdominal breathing is the more natural and healthful breathing frequency than the higher 10-20 breath per minute rate and, in fact, this slow breathing comes naturally to infants and children. Over time, as we age, people tend to adopt the chest breathing pattern. Contributing factors to this change may be higher levels of stress and/or anxiety, which tend to alter breathing to faster rates, and cosmetic/psychosocial factors such as avoiding the undesirable physical appearance of having the abdomen extended. In yoga and pranayama practice it is believed that the respiratory pattern can be modified over time to the more beneficial, slower, abdominal breathing pattern and some research has supported this contention. In a Belgian study published in 1981 in the Journal of Applied Physiology, the spontaneous breathing patterns of 8 accomplished hatha yoga practitioners showed markedly different respiratory characteristics as compared with control subjects matched for sex, height, and age. The spontaneous breath rate in the yoga practitioners was 5.5 breaths per minute on average, significantly lower compared with the 13.4 breaths per minute in non-practitioners. Accordingly, the tidal volume (the lung volume of air displaced between normal inhalation and exhalation when breathing normally), in the yoga practitioners was 1.03 liters, significantly larger than the 0.56 liters in the non-practitioners. The authors suggested that the slower breathing rate was directly attributable to effects of the yoga and pranayama practices over time, proposing hypothetically that these changes could be mediated either by changes in stretch receptor characteristics in the chest or by a chronic reduction in sympathetic drive. However, a weakness of such a retrospective study of individuals who self-selected into yoga practice is that it is not possible to exclude the possibility that people with altered breathing patterns are naturally attracted to yoga practice. To address this concern definitively, prospective randomized controlled trials with naïve subjects are required and a number of studies have done exactly this, thereby addressing this concern. In a research study by a French team of investigators published in 2005, 16 subjects who had not practiced yoga previously underwent an intervention of yogic ujjayi breathing involving very slow, deep breaths at 2 to 3 breaths per minute with a sustained breath-retention after each inspiration and expiration. They did this for 20 to 30 minutes daily for 2 months. The researchers reported that the spontaneous respiratory frequency was significantly reduced from 19.6 breaths per minute to 13.6 breaths per minute, and also that the increase in the duration of the exhale contributed most to this slower breathing pattern. One of the most recent studies to confirm this capability was conducted in India with 60 subjects naïve to yoga practice aged 20-50 years. They practiced slow breathing at a rate of about 6 breaths per minute for 8-10 minutes twice daily for 3 months. Their respiratory rate before the intervention was 20 breaths per minute and was reduced significantly to 17 breaths per minute afterwards. The study also reported a statistically significant reduction in spontaneous resting heart rate as well as a significant shift from a predominantly chest-thoracic breathing pattern to a breathing pattern with more abdominal-belly movement. Although such studies are supportive of the ability of humans to self-regulate their breath frequency to become lower, scientists often need additional information that elucidates the mechanisms involved before they can be definitively convinced. This is difficult in human subjects given the challenge of recording neural activity within the central nervous system. It would be ideal if there was an animal model of this phenomenon that would lend itself more easily to such mechanistic study. Fortunately, we now have a rat model of slow breathing. A research team from Emory University published a paper in 2017 in the journal Frontiers in Physiology entitled “Slow Breathing Can Be Operantly Conditioned in the Rat and May Reduce Sensitivity to Experimental Stressors”. In this study they were successfully able to condition rats to breath slowly over multiple training sessions over 2 weeks by using a flashing light stimulus, which rats do not like. In the conditioning training with exposure to the flashing light, rats were able to turn off the light when they reduced their respiratory rate below a threshold respiratory rate of 80 breaths per minute (rats breath much more rapidly than humans). The conditioned rats reduced their average respiratory rate significantly from an average of 92 breaths per minute to 81 breaths per minute. This result shows unequivocally that it is possible for mammals to change their spontaneous respiratory rate with training. However, the study took an important step further by then challenging both the normal and slow-breathing rats with stressful stimuli. An animal model of this phenomenon would lend itself more easily to mechanistic study and, fortunately, we now have a rat model of slow breathing. Studies have shown that slow breathing has numerous psychophysiological benefits and that breath regulation is one of the most commonly used practices immediately following initiation of yoga practice by beginners. There is, therefore, a significant potential for promoting the value of breath regulation practices in society, particularly slow breathing, which is relatively easy to learn and implement in day-to-day, real-life circumstances. The demonstration that humans can slow their spontaneous respiratory rate with practice, and the virtue of having an animal model of this that will lead to future research on the mechanism of these changes, suggests that we are moving quickly towards certainty and confidence regarding the practical benefits and application of slow yogic breathing.

 

Sat Bir Singh Khalsa, Ph.D. Sat Bir Singh Khalsa, Ph.D. is the KRI Director of Research, Research Director for the Kripalu Center for Yoga & Health, and Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. He has practiced a Kundalini Yoga lifestyle since 1973 and is a KRI certified Kundalini Yoga instructor. He has conducted research on yoga for insomnia, stress, anxiety disorders, and yoga in public schools. He is editor in chief of the International Journal of Yoga Therapy and The Principles and Practice of Yoga in Health Care and author of the Harvard Medical School ebook Your Brain on Yoga.

 

 

 

 


 

 

Back to Basics: Mulbandh – Root Lock Hacienda de Guru Ram Das The bandhas are locks applied to the body in yoga that direct the prana and apana. The locks are basic to Kundalini Yoga, allowing an equilibrium to be established that has an enormous impact on the whole human system. There are three main bandhas – jalandhar bandh - neck lock, uddiyana bandh - diaphragm lock, and mulbandh - root lock. When all three locks are applied together, with the correct posture and concentration, it is known as mahabandh - the great lock. In talking about the locks, Yogi Bhajan said,

"It is a fundamental law of most exercises in Kundalini Yoga that you will apply mulbandh, though it is not asked for in detail in all instances. You will be told to put yourself in a posture with a certain sound current and a certain breathing pattern. But all the kriyas have certain things in common which are assumed. First is the proper posture and second the locks. You are required to apply these three locks properly and appropriately. Then one is said to be in the state of mahabandh— the great lock. This yoga was designed carefully by saints and masters and is the fastest route to elevation and happiness."

Mulbandh is the most complex of the three body locks. It coordinates, stimulates, and balances the energies of the first, second, and third chakras. It redirects excess sexual energy into creativity and healing, and if there is a lack of sexual vitality it will help correct it. This bandh is frequently applied at the end of a kriya to crystalize its effects. The application of mulbandh has three parts:
  • First, contract the anal sphincter. Feel the muscles lift upward and inward.
  • Once these muscles tighten, contract the area around the sex organ. This is experienced as a slight lift and rotation inward of the pubic bone.
  • Then contract the lower abdominal muscles and the navel point towards the spine.
Mulbandh – Root LockThese three actions applied together in a smooth, rapid flow is the mulbandh. This lock can be applied with the breath retained in or out. The key effect of the mulbandh is the blending of the prana and apana at the navel center. It stimulates the proper flow of spinal fluid and begins the transformation of the gross to the subtle. Guruprem Singh says about mulbandh: “The trick, with time and practice, is to learn to refine this lock so that only the muscles necessary to hold the lock are contracted. The perineum is located between the anus and the genitals. Learning to isolate the perineum when doing mulbandh is important because of the nerve structure of the body. The perineum is like a crossroads for many nerves and when it is properly balanced and stimulated it can send impulses from the first chakra up through the spinal cord.”

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

Sat Nam from The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings Downloading Videos and Creating Video Clips Did you know that all lectures that include video have the capability for users to download or create video clips of specific parts? This is so helpful when you are practicing a kriya from the lecture, or if you find a segment of the lecture you want to keep in your file or forward to a friend. Follow these easy steps to learn how to do this. Downloading videos The download feature is located to the bottom right corner of the video screen, within the three little dots. By clicking on it, you can download the full video and watch it anytime without internet access! Example [1]
Click image to view larger version
Click image to view larger version

 

Sharing video clips This is a very useful tool for saving or sharing a small portion of the lecture, for example saving a kriya to share in your yoga class, send to a friend, or save in your phone for your own personal practice.

 

 

Library of Teachings Donation

 

 

 

 

In Gratitude, Shabd Simran Shabd Simran Kaur Adeniji, Fundraising Coordinator The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings® Kundalini Research Institute Email: donations@kriteachings.org Find us on Facebook “The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachingswww.libraryofteachings.com

 

 

The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings is a non-profit organization and all donations are tax deductible under IRS code 501(c)(3).

 


 

 

KRI July 2019 Specials Your Own Infinity New Book! Your Own Infinity The Teachings of Yogi Bhajan Compiled by Hargopal Kaur Khalsa Infinity, God, the Unknown! Infinity, God, the Unknown! There are countless names and approaches towards the Infinite. Yogi Bhajan shared many ways to connect with that exalted elevated state of consciousness. Some of these paths are included here. Take a peek and see what resonates with you. “Self-Realization is God realization… What is your self-realization? This is yourself. Know it, feel it, touch it.” -Yogi Bhajan Included are 26 Kriyas and Meditations, all given by Yogi Bhajan to provide you with the experience of rising above your finite self and merging with the Infinite, Creative Consciousness. Hargopal Kaur, having had a career in aerospace, now devotes herself to teaching Sat Nam Rasayan®, yoga, and meditation; facilitating family constellations; and serving clients. She also compiles books based on Yogi Bhajan’s teachings. Her passion is to uplift and help people grow and feel better – emotionally, physically, mentally, and spiritually. Through her own meditative practice, and having studied with Yogi Bhajan, Guru Dev Singh, and Bert Hellinger, she is focused on emptying herself so that she can clearly, neutrally, compassionately serve. Hargopal is based in Los Angeles and teaches in the US, Canada, and Europe. PAGES: 320 Retail Price: $24.95 Promo: $21.28 Ebook: $13.47 (10% off)

 


 

The 21 Stages of Meditation The 21 Stages of Meditation Gurucharan Singh Khalsa, PhD Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan Defined by Yogi Bhajan and elucidated by Gurucharan Singh, The 21 Stages of Meditation is a key work in deepening your understanding and experience of meditation. Ranging from Upset and Boredom, Humility, Graceful Enlightenment, and the Sage, explore these stages and more; explore three distinct meditative journeys, which culminate in the pinnacle of contemplative awareness, Stage 21-The Infinite Pulse. Regular Retail: $44.95 Promo: $38.21 Ebook: $18.89 (10% off)

 


 

Timeless Wisdom from Yogi Bhajan DVD Series
3 Kundalini Yoga Class DVDs and 3 Kundalini Yoga Lecture and Meditation DVDs in two complementary collections. Kundalini Yoga Class Series (These all have yoga sets) Eliminating Inner Anger DVD Refining the Spirit DVD Angular Body Energy DVD Kundalini Yoga Lecture and Meditation Series (These are lectures followed by meditation) Winning Through Trust DVD Reaching the Real You DVD Discover Your Soul DVD Retail: $19.95 per DVD Promo: $16.96 KRI Recipe of the Month for July 2019 A very healthy & tasty breakfast Excerpt From: “From Vegetables, With Love: Recipes and Tales from a Yogi's Kitchen (Revised and Expanded New Edition).” Siri-Ved Kaur Khalsa Yogi Bhajan's Fountain of Youth Yield: 2 servings
Fountain of Youth
For good health, youthful radiance, and to improve elimination, try this puréed fruit salad for breakfast. Raw almonds that are soaked in water and peeled are delicious, sweet, and easy to digest. I like to keep a jar of almonds soaking in the fridge, so I always have some handy for this quick breakfast or a fruit smoothie. I sometimes use raw sesame butter instead of sesame seeds. 15 raw almonds, soaked and peeled 2 small apples 2 small ripe bananas 1 large green bell pepper 3 tablespoon raw sesame seeds Soak almonds in cold water overnight or for several hours. Remove skins (they will slip off easily). Core apples and cut into quarters (do not pare). Wash and remove stems from peppers. Keep seeds. Place almonds, apples, bananas, peppers and sesame seeds in a blender jar. Scrape the inner white from the peel of the bananas and add. Blend or process all ingredients until puréed (you will need to pause every few seconds to press ingredients down).

 

 

 

 

 


 

Trainer’s Corner
Trainer’s Forum
What is a Trainer Forum? A Trainer Forum is a meeting place for open dialogue amongst members and applicants of the Aquarian Trainer Academy. It is an opportunity for professional development as a trainer, a time to come together as a community of trainers to refresh our spirit and revisit our values, build skills and share best practices, create new relationships and deepen existing ones. If you are interested in joining the Steering Committee for your local/regional Forum contact trainerforum@kriteachings.org 2019 TRAINER FORUMS: CULTURE, COMMUNICATION, COMMUNITY
  • EUROPE: Chateau Anand, Saint Pierre de Maille, France New Times! July 25, 8:30a – 5:30p & July 26, 8:30am – 12:30p Register Here - Featured European Trainer Forum workshops – Psychology & Kundalini Yoga with Haridevta Kaur How to Lead a Rebirthing class with Sukhdev Kaur Mentoring Skills presenters TBA Skill Building in Content Credits for Philosophy and/or Anatomy & Physiology presenters TBA All Forum Workshop: Economic Diversity in Kundalini Yoga – Coming Together to Share Resources presenters TBA All Forum Workshop: The Legacy of Kundalini Yoga presenters TBA
  • AUSTRALIA: Australia Kundalini Yoga Festival October 7, 6:00p – 9:00p & October 8, 9:00a – 6:00p
  • CHINA October 26 – 27, times and location TBA
  • WINTER SOLSTICE: Hampton Inn, Lake Wales, Florida, December 14, 8:30a – 5:30p & December 15, 8:30a – 12:30p

 

 


 

KRI June Newsletter


 

 

 

 


 

A Note From Nirvair Summer Solstice Sat Nam. Greetings from sunny New Mexico. Summer Solstice Sadhana Celebration and the 50th Anniversary of 3HO is here! On July 7, 1977, Yogi Bhajan talked about Summer Solstice Sadhana. I have used this quotation before, but it really captures the essence of Solstice for me. “The purpose of a human being is to release oneself from this earth so that one can go to the heavens. That's why they say, heavens are above, earth is below. Whosoever is bound to the earth shall remain bound to the earth and remain bound to earth for infinity. You shall be nothing, your destiny is decided. There is no hell for you, there is no heaven for you, all there is for you is ghost, ghost, ghost, and ghost. That's why, when we do White Tantric Yoga at the summer solstice time, the entire land is filled with souls begging to hear you chant. It is amazing! There were six hundred people one day chanting [during White Tantric Yoga]. We were in ecstasy, and there was so much fighting above us! Those souls were trying to come deeper and deeper, the magnetic field expanding to go over and over, and in that hassle… I couldn't explain it. I wish you could all have those eyes. You should have watched what was going on. They were your ancestors who were hung in this earth-bound circuit for thousands, hundreds of thousands of millions and zillion years seeking liberation. It was an amazing sight to see. It was a wonder of God. That is why this time, when we wanted to let God speak to us, we heard a huge thunder clap. God spoke to us from mercy, not because we were very wonderful human beings, but because those thousands and hundred-thousand souls got relieved and released. That's called yagna, that's what we do. “People do not understand summer solstice. These Americans do not understand it at all. That is the time when the sun’s energy and the earth’s magnetic field are at the peak. Aah, that is the most wonderful combination, to meditate, recite, and chant [during this time]. And in that openness, in the wilderness of the Mother Nature, we call upon the Heavenly Father.” There is a lot of activity and opportunity to use the sun energy of the summer to accelerate our yogic and spiritual practices. Summer Solstice Sadhana Celebration in New Mexico and the July European Yoga Festival in France are very special events. You get to be with a large group of Kundalini Yogis, study with excellent teachers, and practice three Days of White Tantric Yoga®. Solstice and Yoga Festival will rejuvenate and uplift you for months to come. Yogi Bhajan often said to plan the year around our Solstice celebrations. I will be teaching at the special 50th Anniversary of 3HO at Summer Solstice Sadhana this year. Join me for a physical and a meditative kriya Friday June 14th under the Tantric Shelter at 10:15 AM. See you there! Come by KRI’s booth in the bazaar to see and buy new books and DVD’s. We are excited to present a new book in The Teachings of Yogi Bhajan series entitled Your Own Infinity. In this latest collection of curated quotes, Hargopal Kaur explores the concept of God as presented by Yogi Bhajan. It is an amazing read, drawing you deeper and deeper into the concept of Infinity. Here is an excerpt from the introduction: “In virtually every lecture, Yogi Bhajan steered us to God, to the Infinite, and to ourselves. Sometimes, he dropped a pearl of wisdom that shattered our misconceptions, our preconceptions, and exposed our astounding lack of perception. He found the angles that could penetrate our consciousness and clear a path to awareness.” International Teacher Training Does practicing Kundalini Yoga inspire you to want to teach? Now is the time for Teachers! I just was teaching at our Spring Immersion in Bali. We had students from 22 different countries. I can’t say enough about the greatness of the KRI Immersions. Not only do you truly learn how to deliver a class in Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan® but it is a deep and profound experience of spiritual community! The Aquarian Age is here, and it is calling you! We still have space available in our International Teacher Training Level One Immersion in Espanola, New Mexico. Become a Teacher of Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan this summer at the ashram and ranch of Yogi Bhajan. I really look forward to this training program; it is a truly incredible experience for the students as well as the teachers. Nirvair Singh Khalsa

 

In the Name of God, I serve. Nirvair Singh Khalsa CEO KRI

 

 

 

 


 


 

 

Yogi Bhajan’s Ranch Ranch Hacienda de Guru Ram DasHacienda de Guru Ram Das, affectionately known as “The Ranch,” was the home of Yogi Bhajan and his family in Espanola, New Mexico. It was here, on October 6, 2004, that he breathed his last breath and merged with Infinity. He loved his Ranch, and the spirit of Yogi Bhajan vibrates in every tree and rock still today. One of the very special parts of KRI Level One Immersion in Espanola is that you have the opportunity to experience the Ranch and make a physical connection to the place where Yogi Bhajan lived. The Ranch started as a small adobe home on a country road, when Yogi Bhajan purchased it in 1974. They expanded over time and beautified the land to match his vision. He and his wife Bibiji worked tirelessly to make their home a place to welcome students and guests from around the world. The Ranch was always open to visitors for spiritual conversation and a delicious meal. The Dome was Yogi Bhajan’s private meditation room, built by his students in 1975 as a gift of love and dedication to their teacher. Once asked about why the shape of a dome was chosen, Yogi Bhajan said, “If you take the globe and cut it in half, it is the shape of a dome. Because of this, a dome contains the energy of the earth.” Here, in this simple structure, he spent many long hours. It was his place of peace and solitude, where he meditated and worked. Yogi Bhajan taught the first summer course in 1975 at the Ranch, a lecture series now known as “Under the Blue Sky of New Mexico.” Students came and sat in the garden courtyard and listened every day throughout the month of July as Yogi Bhajan lectured on how to walk the spiritual path as a conscious human being. Over the next 30 years, people came from around the world to visit and learn from Yogi Bhajan at the Ranch. Ranch Once, a student asked, “Sir, we have met you and know who you are, but what about the children who are yet to be born and the yoga students who did not get to meet you? How will they understand who you are?” Yogi Bhajan replied, “Take a stone as tall as I am (he was 6’2½”) and engrave it, ‘Born Zero, Died at One’.” This is the memory stone that now stands at the Ranch. Born at Zero means he came from the Infinite, as symbolized by the circle. Died at One means he died when his consciousness was at One with God, the One Creator of everyone. As you experience the Ranch, take a moment of silent stillness and feel the subtle energy. That is the energy of Yogi Bhajan, the Mahan Tantric, the Siri Singh Sahib. It is potent, powerful, and yet comforting and calming. It is something you will remember and reconnect with many times on your journey as a teacher of Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan®. International Teacher Training The Aquarian Teacher, KRI Level One Teacher Training Program August 3 - August 30, 2019 Espanola, New Mexico, USA http://immersion.kundaliniresearchinstitute.org Important Note: Fulfillment of the program certification requirements continues through February 2020

 

 

More images from the ranch:
Ranch
Ranch

 

 

 


 

 

21 Stages
21 Stages

 

 


 

The Genesis of Yoga Therapy Research by Sat Bir Singh Khalsa, Ph.D. Yoga Therapy Research Historically, yoga has been fundamentally a spiritual practice to attain unitive states of consciousness or the samadhi state. However, given the fact that yoga employs both physical (asana, pranayama, relaxation) and cognitive (meditation) practices to foster self-regulation and optimize human functioning, its relevance to restoring optimal functioning in disease states has been an obvious possibility. Even in the 15th century Hatha Yoga Pradipika are statements attesting to the benefits of specific yogic practices in reducing obesity, removing abdominal disorders, fatigue, and edema and generally “destroying all diseases” including leprosy. By the beginning of the 20th century, we see the systematic application of yoga as a treatment for therapeutic conditions in India. The Yoga Institute in Mumbai documented the application of yoga as therapy to 124 patients in 1918-19, reporting “Symptom relief in most cases. Occasional verification by physician.” In a two-year period from 1920-22, 2,000 patients were treated with the identical claim of clinical improvement. Similarly, the Kaivalyadhama Yoga Institute, founded in 1924 and also in Mumbai, was reporting in its 1930 volume of its research journal Yoga Mimamsa that “nearly two thousand people have been treated…as…patients. People suffering from constipation, dyspepsia, auto-intoxication, nervous debility, asthma, piles, seminal weakness, heart troubles and a variety of other diseases have found great relief from Yogic Therapy.” Unfortunately, such vague descriptions of clinical benefit clearly failed to meet any kind of acceptable scientific or clinical criteria that provide confidence in attesting to the safety and efficacy of yoga therapy. Even as late as 1964 in a four-paragraph report by Higashi in the prestigious medical journal Lancet we are still provided with minimal documentation of specific quantitative details of clinical improvement. In a Tokyo sanatorium, they applied a daily 10-minute pranayama practice over a year to 50 male schizophrenic patients. The clinical outcome is marginally and vaguely described with the text: “About the beginning of the third month, we noticed that the patients gathered spontaneously at the usual place. When the session ended a quiet atmosphere prevailed for some time. Moreover the average number of patients participating was 81% as against 56% in the previous year.” It’s conclusion stated, “An exercise which controls breathing favourably influences the psychiatric regimen.” Given the proliferation of yoga therapy in India, yet conducted without adequate research and clinical documentation, the Ministry of Health of the Government of India created a committee in 1960 led by well-known leading yoga researcher Dr. B.K. Anand to evaluate yoga therapy claims. It collected information from 71 institutions across India, visiting 19 select institutions, and yielded the 1962 Ministry of Education 72-page document entitled “Report of the Committee on Evaluation of Therapeutical Claims of Yogic Practices.” It concluded that for lack of proper data and the personnel adequately trained to collect such data, it was not possible for it to evaluate Yogic therapy claims. It further stated, “Unless a scientific assessment of the patient treated by Yogic therapy is organized under controlled conditions, it will not be possible to evaluate the important therapeutic claims of Yoga." Finally, in 1966 we see the publication of perhaps the first acceptably-reported biomedical research evaluation of yoga therapy by Vahia, Vinekar and Doongaji in an 8-page paper in the British Journal of Psychiatry. In this case series study conducted with the Kaivalyadhama Institute they describe results of 4 to 6-week yoga therapy sessions with patients at the K.E.M. Hospital in Mumbai. A table in the report describes multiple characteristics including demographics, diagnoses, treatment durations, and quantitative percent improvements for 30 patients with psychosomatic conditions such as anxiety, depression, headache, insomnia, cognitive difficulties and other stress-related symptoms. They further included 3 detailed case reports that were presented in the format and with the amount of detail that would be viewed as reasonable from a modern clinical research presentation perspective. It was not long after this that we see the first humble clinical trial publication in yoga therapy published in Yoga Mimamsa in 1967, to be followed by the first randomized controlled trials on yoga for hypertension by yoga researcher Chandra Patel in the U.K. in the early 70’s. From that first 1967 trial of yoga for asthma through to 2003, there were approximately 150 clinical trials published, a number which tripled to about 450 publications 10 years later by 2013. We are now fortunately in the position in this field in that we are experiencing an exponentially increasing growth in the number of clinical yoga research studies and publications with more and more of the rigorous randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses necessary to justify recommendation of continued yoga therapy research and implementation of yoga interventions in modern medicine.

 

Sat Bir Singh Khalsa, Ph.D. Sat Bir Singh Khalsa, Ph.D. is the KRI Director of Research, Research Director for the Kripalu Center for Yoga & Health, and Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. He has practiced a Kundalini Yoga lifestyle since 1973 and is a KRI certified Kundalini Yoga instructor. He has conducted research on yoga for insomnia, stress, anxiety disorders, and yoga in public schools. He is editor in chief of the International Journal of Yoga Therapy and The Principles and Practice of Yoga in Health Care and author of the Harvard Medical School ebook Your Brain on Yoga.

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

Back to Basics Back to BasicsPranam Mudra – Prayer Pose Pranam Mudra, or Prayer Pose, is one of the most frequently used mudras in Kundalini Yoga. Each class begins with hands in Prayer Pose, chanting the Adi Mantra, and closes with the “Long Time Sun” song, hands in Pranam. Back to Basics Pranam Mudra balances and neutralizes the positive side of the body (right, sun, masculine) with the negative side (left, moon, feminine). It is a perfect way to bring the human system into harmony and prepare to receive the benefits of Kundalini Yoga. It is a graceful and humble mudra of supplication, acknowledging and opening the heart to the One. Many students tend to hold the mudra a little low or let the fingers angle out away from the body. Take a moment in your next class to bring their attention to Pranam Mudra and help your students perfect the angles. Palms are together with the bracelet lines of the wrist (where the palm and wrist join) placed at the heart center. The fingers are at 90 degrees, pointing straight up under the bottom of the chin. Apply an even and constant pressure on all 10 fingers and the palms as well as against the sternum (the breastbone). “Now, please fold your hands. Watch, some people do not know how fold their hands… [Hold it at] exactly 90 degrees, all fingers together, thumbs together. And this is a 'V' shape, victory shape, between your thumbs and your fingers. It has to be at the heart center. Base of the three rings, [the bracelet lines of the wrist] health, wealth and happiness, must be at the heart center, understood?” Yogi Bhajan, April 22, 1997

 

 

 

 


 

 

Sat Nam from The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings® Have you explored the Historical Notes tool in the Library of Teachings? This delightful feature allows users to view Historical Notes while reading or viewing a lecture or kriya. Historical Notes are notations done by students in the class, pertaining to the kriya, at the time the original lecture was given. You will notice that the notes vary widely - some are just a few handwritten lines while others are typewritten text with hand-drawn diagrams. You can gain valuable insight from the Historical Notes, picking up emphasis and perspective that only first-hand experience can give. These Historical Notes are made from scanning the original documents contributed by legacy students. We then create the notes as Adobe documents that are downloadable for readers. To Search for lectures that contain Historical Notes:
  • Simply enter the topic into the search-bar on our homepage (see Example [1] below searching for the topic "Love")
  • Next look for the 'Filters' to the left of your search results and select the plus sign next to 'Media.'
  • Under 'Media' you will see the option 'Historical Notes.' It will note the number of lectures that contain Historical Notes (in the sample below it shows there are 12). Click on 'Historical Notes' and it will take you to the results of this search.
  • Once you select the lecture and you want to view the Historical Notes, click on this icon: The student notes will pop-up in the document. (See Example [2] below.)
This feature is one that scholars and novices alike will enjoy. And as always, let us know what you think. Email us at donations@kriteachings.org.
Example (1) Click image to view larger version
Example (2) Click image to view larger version

 

Library of Teachings Donation
In Gratitude, Shabd Simran Shabd Simran Kaur Adeniji, Fundraising Coordinator The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings® Kundalini Research Institute Email: donations@kriteachings.org Find us on Facebook “The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachingswww.libraryofteachings.com

 

 

The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings® is a non-profit organization and all donations are tax deductible under IRS code 501(c)(3).

 

 


 

Trainer’s Corner
Trainer’s Forum
What is a Trainer Forum? A Trainer Forum is a meeting place for open dialogue amongst members and applicants of the Aquarian Trainer Academy. It is an opportunity for professional development as a trainer, a time to come together as a community of trainers to refresh our spirit and revisit our values, build skills and share best practices, create new relationships and deepen existing ones. If you are interested in joining the Steering Committee for your local/regional Forum contact trainerforum@kriteachings.org 2019 TRAINER FORUMS: CULTURE, COMMUNICATION, COMMUNITY
  • SUMMER SOLSTICE: Hacienda de Guru Ram Das, Espanola, New Mexico New Times! June 12, 8:30a – 5:30p & June 13, 8:30a – 12:30p Register Here - Featured Summer Solstice Trainer Forum workshops – Consciously Leading Rebirthing Workshops with Dr. Krishna Kaur and Sant Kaur I AM with You – Facilitating the Flow of Collaboration in Community with Puranjot Kaur and Jai Gopal Kaur The Hidden Challenges of Mentoring with Siri Neel Kaur, Tarn Taran Kaur, and Awtar Kaur Level Two: Vitality & Stress with Deva Kaur All Forum Workshop: Global Racial Inclusion to support Diversity & Inclusivity in the Academy with Dr. Japa Kaur, Vedya Amrita, DukhNiwaran Kaur, and Awtar Kaur All Forum Workshop: The Legacy of Kundalini Yoga with Nirvair Singh and Krishna Kaur
  • EUROPE: Chateau Anand, Saint Pierre de Maille, France New Times! July 25, 8:30a – 5:30p & July 26, 8:30am – 12:30p Register Here - Featured European Trainer Forum workshops – Psychology & Kundalini Yoga with Haridevta Kaur How to Lead a Rebirthing class with Sukhdev Kaur Mentoring Skills presenters TBA Skill Building in Content Credits for Philosophy and/or Anatomy & Physiology presenters TBA All Forum Workshop: Economic Diversity in Kundalini Yoga – Coming Together to Share Resources presenters TBA All Forum Workshop: The Legacy of Kundalini Yoga presenters TBA
  • AUSTRALIA: Australia Kundalini Yoga Festival October 7, 6:00p – 9:00p & October 8, 9:00a – 6:00p
  • CHINA October 26 – 27, times and location TBA
  • WINTER SOLSTICE: Hampton Inn, Lake Wales, Florida, December 14, 8:30a – 5:30p & December 15, 8:30a – 12:30p

 

 


 

KRI June 2019 Specials The Chakras The Chakras Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan® The chakras are the keys to being human and being happy. In this collection, Yogi Bhajan, the Master of Kundalini Yoga, defines the nature of the chakras, how they work, their interaction, projection and potency with both humor and subtlety, and often surprising candor. Regular Retail: $29.95 Promo: $25.46 Ebook: $13.49 (10% off)

 


 

The Chakras
The Chakras 7 (2 DVDs per set) DVD Series The progressive nature of the human is to succeed…and that is where the science of the chakras comes through. The First Chakra: Meditation on the First Chakra The Second Chakra: Meditation on the Second Chakra The Third Chakra: Meditation on the Third Chakra The Fourth Chakra: Meditation on the Fourth Chakra and Arti Kriya The Fifth Chakra: Meditation on the Fifth Chakra The Sixth Chakra: Chaar Padh Meditation and Meditation on Being a Yogi The Seventh Chakra: Hissing Meditation for the Glandular System l and ll Regular Retail: $24.95 per 2-DVD Set Promo: $21.21 per 2-DVD Set Or take advantage of our everyday Full Set Special of $130.00 for all 14 DVDs in 7-DVD packaged sets.

 


 

Art & Yoga Art & Yoga Kundalini Awakening in Everyday Life by Hari Kirin Kaur Khalsa “The sole purpose of life is the soul.” — Yogi Bhajan Learn to express your soul’s longing, delve into images that awaken your imagination and speak of a truth yet unexplored. Allow Art & Yoga to take you on a journey to your intuitive, creative and authentic self—the True Being, awakened! This book is for anyone interested in yoga and the arts. It explains how to create a daily Art and Yoga practice. It provides step-by-step guidelines for producing art and doing yoga as complementary practices individually, in a group, or in community. Yogis will find creative exercises to deepen their experience of yoga, while artists will discover simple, yet profound yoga and meditation practices that will help their creative flow, focus, and intuition. Along the way, we will draw inspiration from the teachings of Yogi Bhajan, nature, artists of the past, and recent developments in healing and spirituality. Retail: $29.95 Promo: $25.46 Ebook: $16.19 (10% 0ff)

KRI Recipe of the Month for June 2019 To commemorate the 50th Anniversary of 3HO, KRI is featuring another way to prepare mung beans that is amazingly delicious! Excerpt From: From Vegetables, With Love: Recipes and Tales from a Yogi's Kitchen (Revised and Expanded New Edition) Siri-Ved Kaur Khalsa Spicy Mung Beans with Mustard Greens Yield: 4–6 servings
Spicy Mung Beans with Mustard Greens
Serve this in place of regular daal or as a soup. For a little variety, add a diced potato in the last 20 minutes of cooking. 2 bunches mustard greens, chopped 1 cup mung beans 6 cups water ⅓ cup oil 2 medium onions, thinly sliced 4 cloves garlic, minced 2 tablespoons minced fresh ginger 1 rounded teaspoon garam masala ¼ teaspoon cayenne or to taste ½ teaspoon turmeric 1 teaspoon cumin seeds or kala jeera ½ teaspoon pepper 2 tomatoes, peeled and chopped ½ cup ghee or olive oil Boil greens and beans in water until very well done (about 45 minutes). Then, using a blender or food processor, coarsely purée, adding enough broth (and additional water if necessary) to attain a soupy consistency. Meanwhile, heat oil in a skillet over a medium-high flame and fry onions, garlic, and ginger 8–10 minutes until lightly browned. Add spices and cook few more minutes, with a little extra water if necessary to prevent scorching/sticking. Add chopped tomatoes and cook another 8–10 minutes until the “masala” is very saucy (add a little water as needed) and unified. Combine this mixture with the beans-greens mixture in a large saucepan. Add ghee and cook 5 more minutes. Adjust seasoning with salt to taste.

 

KRI May Newsletter


 

 

 

 


 

A Note From Nirvair May KRI Newsletter Sat Nam. Greetings from New Mexico where spring is in full swing! May is a great month – two celebrations in the United States are very much in alignment with Yogi Bhajan’s teachings and mission - Mother’s Day and Teachers’ Day. Yogi Bhajan talks about the innate compassion of the mother in this July 5th, 1976 lecture. “Many exploit this human creature, so much insult this human creature is going through, and so much abuse this human creature is going through. Still, this human creature maintains radiance and the grace because this human creature, known as a woman, is actually the fountain of the Divine Spirit. “Now, I challenge the entirety of science. I challenge those who think that the whole world is in their hand. What I say to them is, ‘You can produce anything, but you cannot produce a system that has the intelligence of a mother's compassion.’ It's impossible. Because the day they can produce the intelligence of a mother’s compassion, they can produce God. Actually, there is no difference between the two.” And this is what Yogi Bhajan said on August 2nd, 1997 about the faculty, beauty, and character of a Teacher. “The greatest faculty of a teacher is they may look like kings, but they live like fakirs (ascetic monks). There is no harm in showing riches and grace and all that. For a commoner, that is fine. But in his heart, the teacher is the humblest of the humblest humble. That is the beauty of the teacher. A teacher is direct, commanding on the problem. A teacher speaks direct, confronting the student and elevating the student. A teacher speaks very personally, but himself or herself remain impersonal. “The character of the teacher is that if they can honor their master if they can honor their teacher, they will be a very honorable teacher. If they don’t, they will be S…H…*…T. I don't want to pronounce that word but ultimately, they have to eat it themselves - there is no one else. Because when you cannot trust the one who taught you, you cannot trust what you have learned. And when you cannot trust what you have learned, that is a tragedy! “So, that is why we say, it is not in God we trust, it is in God we dwell. A teacher of the Aquarian Age will not say, ‘In God I trust,” he shall say, ‘In God, I dwell.’” If you are thinking about becoming a teacher, please come and share with us in the experience of beautiful New Mexico this summer. The KRI Immersion program will be in Espanola on August 3rd through August 30th, 2019. This is the Aquarian Teacher International Teacher Training Level One program in Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan®. I really look forward to this every summer. Students come from all over the world, and it is great fun for me to get to know our new teachers personally. May KRI Newsletter With spring here, it is natural to think about renewing yourself. If you are already a Level One certified instructor, consider coming to KRI Level Two Vitality and Stress in Espanola. The program has been updated, wonderfully revised, and completely renewed. Spend the week with us at Hacienda de Guru Ram Das this summer and revitalize yourself. Deva Kaur from Florida USA, Ravi Kaur of South Africa, Devinder Kaur from Canada, and I will present this Level Two module June 23rd through June 30th. The kriyas, processes, and lectures by Yogi Bhajan are magnificent, and it is just what we all need to navigate through all this challenging time of life. Many blessings to all the Mothers and Teachers on this planet! Nirvair Singh Khalsa

 

In God I dwell, Nirvair Singh Khalsa CEO KRI

 

 

 

 


 


 

 

Vitality and Stress 2.0– It is all new! Top Reason Kundalini Yoga Level Two Teacher Training module Vitality and Stress has undergone a complete renewal with fresh new classes, lectures, and meditations. Years of preparation, hard work, and research led to something quite amazing! Even if you have taken Vitality and Stress in the past, this exciting new information and presentation will broaden your awareness and improve your ability to guide others. Do not miss this change to be part of the inaugural class of the new Vitality and Stress in New Mexico this summer, June 23-30th. This is your time to dive deep into the teachings of Yogi Bhajan and revitalize your spirit. Vitality and Stress is six days with 50 hours of yoga, meditation, and deep, interactive discussion. It is an advanced and intensive training where you profoundly connect to your own strength and discover that consciousness is the core of your vitality. You will work to identify and remove your own sources of stress that deplete your energy and learn ways to heal emotional fatigue and cold depression in yourself and others. The KRI Level Two Transformation program is a five-module, 310-hour program that takes a minimum of two years to complete. Level One certification is a prerequisite to Level Two training. You will cultivate the practice of self-assessment, clear subconscious blocks, and develops personal and spiritual maturity throughout the Level Two training program. By honestly applying yourself to the study and practice of these five modules, you will undoubtedly be deeply transformed. You can take each of the modules with a different training team if you want or take all five from the same team – it is up to you. There are over 150 Level Two programs around the world! Completion of the five modules of Level Two, which you can take in any order, opens the doors of consciousness and earns the student the certification of Practitioner. Start your journey to Level Two certification this summer with the all-new Vitality and Stress at the Mother Ashram in Espanola, NM. Vitality and Stress“After the first 30 days of the 90-day meditation and practice, I noticed a number of subtle shifts in my physical and energetic bodies, including needing less sleep, having more physical and mental energy, and being relaxed in my body while bright and attentive in my mind. This training program taught me to recognize what I need in my diet, rest, yoga practice, and meditation, to successfully change habits for vitality and victory. “Yogi Bhajan said ‘your subconscious personality persuades you to many actions by sixty percent.’ This Level 2 Transformation module has moved the dial for me, into greater consciousness. I recommend this training program to anyone who is ready to change stress-energy to vital-energy. Sat Nam.” Nam Hari Kaur, New York City and Berkeley, CA

 


 

 

Kundalini Yoga Teacher Training Level Three – The Path toward Realization Level Three The KRI Level Three program is a personal journey to self-realization through deep meditation, selfless service to others, and participation with peers in self-reflection. If you have completed your Level Two certification, beginning your Level Three journey is the path ahead of you. Take a moment and listen to these brief testimonials about the Level Three experience. Isn’t it time you experienced the growth of Level Three for yourself? “In Level Three, one becomes a teacher, a teacher of truth and spirit. You develop the ability to penetrate and communicate through your presence alone and uplift the students through your subtle body. This is the teacher of the Aquarian Age, the Aquarian Teacher. Students experience the truth within them through your intention, projection, and purity.” - Yogi Bhajan, 1996. Successful completion of the Level Three program earns you the highly respected certification of Teacher.
Level Three

 

 

 

 


 

Research on Yoga for Pregnancy by Nikhil Ramburn and Sat Bir Singh Khalsa, Ph.D. Yoga for Pregnancy Pregnancy may be accompanied by several uncomfortable symptoms, which vary from woman to woman. Some common discomforts include backache, sciatica, and hip aches which could be caused by weight-gain, changes in center of gravity, and a loosening of the pelvic joints. Another common challenge is the development of varicose veins due to the increased pressure on the legs, the pelvic veins, and the increased blood volume. In addition, due to the increased pressure on the rectum and perineum and the increased likelihood of becoming constipated in later stages of pregnancy, it is common for women to develop hemorrhoids. Heartburn is another common pathology caused by pressure on the intestines and stomach. Finally, other prevalent challenges in pregnancy include nausea and vomiting, edema, incontinence, and headaches. Apart from physical discomfort, women may also experience psychological changes, with between 14-23% of women struggling with depression during pregnancy. While quality of life scores during pregnancy tend to be very good, some risky areas include partner life satisfaction, the limitations of physical changes, and fears surrounding labor. Pregnant women are increasingly turning to yoga as a complementary and integrative modality to manage the physiological and psychological challenges of pregnancy. Yoga helps to tone the deep muscles of the spine along with the abdominal muscles that support the spine (these muscles are known as the “core”), which facilitates the recruitment of these deep muscle fibers for stabilization. As a result, yoga may be effective in alleviating leg cramps, backache, and strengthening the pelvic floor. In addition, yoga exercises may help with venous blood return thereby mitigating varicose veins and improve fluid circulation to prevent edema. It appears that yoga may also improve placental perfusion and alleviate endothelial dysfunction thereby reducing the risk of pregnancy-related disorders such as intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH), and preeclampsia. Yoga also encourages relaxation, internal focus, and slowed breathing patterns, which are useful to manage fears, anxiety, and depression as well as prepare the practitioner for childbirth. Yoga classes may also provide a supportive environment where women can share their experiences, which may relieve feelings of loneliness and improve quality of life. Several qualitative reports support the benefits of prenatal yoga, such as a 2017 study from the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women's Health at Saint Louis University, MO. Over six months, fifty-two (52) women were randomized into either a yoga group engaged in a one-hour yoga class or a control group that received a presentation on exercise, nutrition, and obesity in pregnancy. The study highlighted a shift in attitude whereby women who participated in yoga reported a more positive attitude towards exercise and yoga. For example, yoga participants felt that yoga was a low intensity exercise that would not hurt their baby and gained self-efficacy by agreeing that they could impact their weight gain in pregnancy with regular exercise. A more recent 2019 study also found that prenatal yoga increases self-efficacy for labor by building confidence and competence by positive story-telling, affirmative language, pain management strategies, and a lower somatic response to stress. The stress management benefits were found to be of particular benefit to pregnant, urban, African-American adolescents who have high rates of stress and depression during pregnancy as well as higher rates of adverse pregnancy outcomes. Indeed, a 2015 community-based qualitative study found that focus groups of low-income pregnant African-American teenagers were interested in yoga classes for stress/depression management and relationship building. Health care providers should focus on these needs when designing future intervention strategies. There is currently a growing body of evidence supporting the use of yoga interventions in pregnancy. A 2015 review of the literature examined 15 articles from the USA, India, Taiwan, Korea and Thailand published from 2008 to December 2013. The researchers concluded that 10 of those studies showed positive changes in maternal psychological or birth outcomes. Another review of Randomized Control Trials (RCTs) from 2004 to 2014 concluded that yoga interventions presented with lower incidences of prenatal disorders, lower levels of pain and stress, and higher scores in relationship. In addition, the researchers found that yoga was more effective than walking or standard prenatal exercises. Furthermore in 2017 after a systematic review of interventions targeting pregnancy-related low back and pelvic pain (PR-LBPP), the authors concluded that yoga may provide pain relief for PR-LBPP as well as some meaningful functional improvements. Indeed, yoga may contribute to a reduction of pregnancy discomfort and so researchers in Taiwan set out to measure the impact of yoga on women in the third trimester of pregnancy. The experimental subjects took part in a 12-14-week prenatal yoga program of 3 sessions per week and reported significantly fewer pregnancy discomforts than a control group. A 2014 study from Brazil also found yoga to be effective at reducing pain in pregnant women, specifically lumbopelvic pain, which is a major problem for the majority of pregnant women. In this study, pregnant women were randomized to either a yoga group or a postural orientation group based on an instructional pamphlet for a 10-week intervention. The yoga sessions consisted of traditional Hatha yoga poses as well as focused breathing patterns, introspection, meditation, and relaxation. Pain intensity was assessed at the beginning and end of each session and researchers found that the median pain score was lower in the yoga group. The experimental group also had a decreased response to lumbar and posterior pelvic pain provocation tests. In addition to the physical benefits highlighted above, yoga may also be an effective strategy to address the stress experienced during pregnancy. The natural bio-physio-psycho-social changes of pregnancy may cause increases in stress and researchers from the Swami Vivekananda Yoga Research Foundation in India aimed to ascertain whether an integrated yoga practice could decrease the stress response in healthy pregnant women. The researchers found that, not only did perceived stress decrease by 31.57% in the yoga group, it actually increased by 6.60% in the control group. In addition, the guided relaxation period in the yoga group correlated with increased parasympathetic activity and decreased sympathetic activity as measured by frequency bands on the heart rate variability spectrum. In a landmark study, researchers examined the effect of prenatal yoga on the stress and immunity salivary biomarkers from 16 to 36 weeks of gestation. Ninety-four healthy pregnant women were randomized to either the yoga intervention or a routine prenatal care. The intervention consisted of two weekly 70-min yoga sessions. Salivary cortisol (stress marker) and immunoglobulin A (immunity marker) levels were collected before and after yoga every 4 weeks. The results revealed that the intervention group had lower salivary cortisol and higher immunoglobulin levels, and infants born to women in the intervention group weighed more than those born to the control group. These findings indicate that prenatal yoga can significantly reduce pregnant women’s stress and enhance their immune function thereby suggesting it is a viable therapy for this population. Another common psychological challenge of pregnancy is depression with up to 20% of pregnant women in the US experiencing depressive symptoms. The numbers are similar in Korea where researchers set out to determine the effectiveness of yoga in the management of prenatal depression. Their review of the literature included six RCTs, and the authors determined that integrated yoga interventions, including relaxation, visualization, breathing patterns or meditation, were associated with a significant decrease in depression levels. However, purely physical-exercise-based interventions did not achieve statistical significance in their improvement of depression scores. A more recent metanalysis from 2019 by the National University Hospital in Singapore included six (6) studies with a total of 405 pregnant women. Researchers found a statistically significant improvement in mood associated with yoga interventions. Despite the promise of yoga as a complement or alternative to pharmacological options, the authors note that the evidence is preliminary and participants only had mild depression. Nonetheless, these improvements are significant since a prompt and effective treatment of maternal depression during pregnancy is important, as depression is an independent predictor of negative maternal and fetal outcomes. Despite the limitations of small sample sizes, lack of consistent randomization, different outcome measures and varying intervention lengths, the current body of evidence highlights that yoga is a promising modality to address a variety of physical and psychological health challenges in pregnancy. Although yoga is generally considered safe in pregnancy, pregnant women are advised to avoid hot yoga due to the increased risk of neural tube defects and other malformations among fetuses exposed to excessive heat as well as the risk of overstretching due to muscle and ligament laxity in pregnancy. Finally, researchers in Taiwan are experimenting with social media to deliver mindful yoga programs for pregnant women and finding that this new approach, using technology, may be a feasible way to reach women in the comfort of their own homes.

 

Nikhil Ramburn Nikhil Rayburn grew up practicing yoga under mango trees in the tropics. He is a certified Kundalini Yoga teacher and has taught yoga to children and adults in Vermont, New Mexico, Connecticut, India, France, and Mauritius. He is a regular contributor to the Kundalini Research Institute newsletter and explores current yoga research.

 

 

 

Sat Bir Singh Khalsa, Ph.D. Sat Bir Singh Khalsa, Ph.D. is the KRI Director of Research, Research Director for the Kripalu Center for Yoga & Health, and Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. He has practiced a Kundalini Yoga lifestyle since 1973 and is a KRI certified Kundalini Yoga instructor. He has conducted research on yoga for insomnia, stress, anxiety disorders, and yoga in public schools. He is editor in chief of the International Journal of Yoga Therapy and The Principles and Practice of Yoga in Health Care and author of the Harvard Medical School ebook Your Brain on Yoga.

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

Back to Basics Back to Basics The Neutral Mind – Quick! You have Nine Seconds The Neutral Mind, the 4th body, is the abode of your intuition. From here, you look at the whole play of life with insight and compassion. The Neutral Mind evaluates the input of your Negative and Positive Minds (and the rest of the Ten Bodies as well) and gives you guidance within a frame of nine seconds. It has a very intuitive vantage point. If your Neutral Mind is weak, you may have a hard time making decisions. You'll have the habit of feeling victimized by life because you don't know how to integrate your experiences and find meaning in them. You may have a hard time seeing beyond the polarities of life on Earth and tuning into the great cosmic scheme of things. As explained by Yogi Bhajan on December 14, 1988. "Let me tell you something - as a human being, whether you are religious or non-religious, whether you are rich or you are poor, whether you are good or you are bad, it does not make any difference in the secret of success. The secret of success is that you must develop yourself to answer anything in nine seconds. Your free will, the gap period in life, is nine seconds. Beyond nine seconds in your life, exists nothing. Not only in nine seconds should you answer anything, in nine seconds you should answer everything, and it has to be a hundred percent correct. There is no chance in your life except for nine seconds. Can you believe it? In nine seconds, you should give a correct answer to any challenge and that is how the human brain is made. Human brains are not made the way you use them. You use your human brain for shallow things and use your life energy for shallow things. When your life energy is used for shallow things, you have no energy to create the answer when deep questions, deep crisis, deep confrontations come. Period. That's how you suffer in your life." How does one develop the ability to answer anything within nine seconds? Develop your stillness and intuition through meditation. Try this one for 40 days. "Meditation for Self-Blessing Guidance by Intuition."

 

 


 

 

Sat Nam from The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings® Library of Teachings This month, we celebrate Teacher’s Day in the United States on May 7 - a big shout out to teachers, everywhere, including all of our wonderful Kundalini Yoga teachers. One thing I love about working for the Library of Teachings is that the KRI staff are all dedicated practitioners, and many are teachers, of Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan®. From May 4th to May 10th, we are hosting the annual Spring Fund Drive for the Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings® to raise funds to support the maintenance and development of the Library. Beginning with the May new moon, we will be exploring the Library of Teachings through the eyes of the people who work here at KRI, showing you the ways they use the Library. Maybe you will see something new and be inspired to expand how you use the Library of Teachings. I think you will find their perspective interesting and motivating in your own journey with © the teachings of Yogi Bhajan. For those of you who have already contributed to our Spring Fund Drive, thank you! As many of you know, even though the searchable database is incredible, there is more work to do! The focus of The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings continues to center on archiving, digitizing, transcribing, and editing the thousands more lectures, kriyas, and yoga sets by Yogi Bhajan. The Library of Teachings is funded by donations from you, the global community of students, teachers, and practitioners. We rely on your donations to make possible our ongoing programs and to undertake important new initiatives. Donors like you have built this database resource over the past 15 years, and we sincerely hope you will be able to donate again this year. Tune-in to your inbox for our emails or if you have missed any of the emails, visit our The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings Facebook page to catch up!
Library of Teachings Donation
In Gratitude, Shabd Simran Shabd Simran Kaur Adeniji, Fundraising Coordinator The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings® Kundalini Research Institute Email: donations@kriteachings.org Find us on Facebook “The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachingswww.libraryofteachings.com

 

 

The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings® is a non-profit organization and all donations are tax deductible under IRS code 501(c)(3).

 

 


 

KRI May 2019 Specials Merging with the Infinite Merging with the Infinite Merging with the Infinite Teachings of Death & Dying Preparation, Process & Prayers The Teachings of Yogi Bhajan Edited by Hargopal Kaur Khalsa Life poses many questions. Dying is one of them: What do we do at the moment of death? For the most part, we deny death. We never really look into the nature of death as a cycle of life. We never examine our reactions; therefore, we never give ourselves the chance to practice how to die as Warrior Saints, gracefully and courageously. Our denial produces either fantasy or fear in the subconscious, which blocks prosperity and creates dis-ease in our lives and our relationships. We must learn how to confront the moment of death and determine our Self within it so that we can ‘cross over’. “If a person doesn’t know how to die and doesn’t know where the grace is or how to confront that last moment, what is the purpose of life?” - Yogi Bhajan Retail: $19.95 PROMO: $16.96

 


 

From Vegetables, With Love
From Vegetables, With Love Recipes & Tales from a Yogi’s Kitchen Completely rewritten and expanded second edition from Siri-Ved Kaur Khalsa In this completely rewritten and expanded edition of From Vegetables with Love, you will find over 300 mouthwatering recipes and a wealth of information about the yogic approach to food and diet, including the healing properties of natural foods and herbs, helpful “yogic kitchen tips”, and stories from Siri Ved’s years serving as Yogi Bhajan’s personal chef. Retail: $44.95 PROMO: $38.21

 


 

Physical Training Physical Training Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan® 5-DVD Box Set This 5-DVD set follows Yogi Bhajan’s teaching Physical Training, commonly called “PT,” at the Ranch in Espanola on five consecutive days in the summer of ’94. Perfect for establishing a weekly workout with Kundalini Yoga. New inset video demonstrates the posture and timing for each exercise so you can follow along with ease. Original videos have been color corrected and audio has been remastered to help bring the experience alive. Keep up and keep fit! Retail: $39.95 Promo: $33.96
KRI Recipe of the Month for May 2019 Excerpt from: From Vegetables, With Love: Recipes and Tales from a Yogi's Kitchen (Revised and Expanded New Edition) Siri-Ved Kaur Khalsa. Yogi Bhajan's Trea Jaaraah— Trinity Life Roots with Tofu Yield: 6 servings
Trinity Life Roots with Tofu
3 tablespoons ghee 1 tablespoon crushed red chiles 1 tablespoon turmeric 1 tablespoon black pepper 3 tablespoons onion powder 2 tablespoons garlic powder 1 tablespoon ginger powder 1 quart water 2 cups tomato sauce ¼ cup tamari soy sauce ½ cup chopped walnuts, pecans or pistachios (raw, unsalted) 1 cup cooked garbanzo or kidney beans 1 cup chopped mushrooms 1 cup broccoli flowerets 2 pounds tofu, drained and cut into bite-size pieces Heat ghee in a large wok or sauté pan over a low flame. Add red chiles and cook until ghee turns red (not brown). Add turmeric and pepper and cook a few moments over a low flame. Then, add the three powders and immediately add water gradually, stirring all the while. Cook over a medium-high flame for 30 minutes. Add tomato sauce, tamari, nuts, beans, mushrooms, and broccoli. Cook until tender. Add tofu, heat thoroughly, and serve.

 

 

Trainer’s Corner
Trainer’s Forum
What is a Trainer Forum? A Trainer Forum is a meeting place for open dialogue amongst members and applicants of the Aquarian Trainer Academy. It is an opportunity for professional development as a trainer, a time to come together as a community of trainers to refresh our spirit and revisit our values, build skills and share best practices, create new relationships and deepen existing ones. Key elements of every Trainer Forum include: Peer-to-Peer Meetings – network, connect, and share best practices and learned lessons Global Decision Making – share your voice and participate in hot topic discussions Workshops – interactive presentations on specialty areas led by both KRI and local trainers We look forward to seeing you at an upcoming Forum! For more information visit: http://trainersupport.kundaliniresearchinstitute.org/trainer-forum/ 2019 Trainer Forums: Culture, Communication, Community Summer Solstice: Hacienda de Guru Ram Das, Espanola, New Mexico New Times! June 12, 8:30a – 5:30p & June 13, 8:30a – 12:30p Register Here Europe: Chateau Anand, Saint Pierre de Maille, France New Times! July 25, 8:30a – 5:30p & July 26, 8:30am – 12:30p Register Here Australia: Australia Kundalini Yoga Festival October 7th, 6:00p – 9:00p & October 8, 9:00a – 6:00p China October 2019 – details TBA Winter Solstice: Hampton Inn, Lake Wales, Florida, December 14, 8:30a – 5:30p & December 15, 8:30a – 12:30p

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


SUPPORT THE KUNDALINI RESEARCH INSTITUTE & THE LIBRARY OF TEACHINGS Library of Teachings Donation

KRI April Newsletter

Happy Earth Day!


Kundalini Research Institute The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings Endowment Fund
SUPPORT THE KUNDALINI RESEARCH INSTITUTE & THE LIBRARY OF TEACHINGS Library of Teachings Donation

 

 

 


 

A Note From Nirvair Earth Day Sat Nam. Greetings from New Mexico! April 22 is Earth Day, and Yogi Bhajan frequently spoke of our relationship to Mother Earth and Mother Nature. He was very concerned about what was happening to the planet. On the day after the 20th anniversary of Earth Day, he was reflecting on the small number of people, only about 2%, that cared about the planet. He went on to say on April 23, 1990, “According to all bylaws of the rules of Earth, if this rate continues, in fifty years the planet Earth will not be habitable for humans. Period. That is not an emotional calculation, that's very, very factual.” He urged the students in the class to take action for recycling and conservation of energy and resources. Personally, I always appreciated how Yogi Bhajan would relate a concept, like consciously taking care of the Earth or recognizing the laws of nature, to a practical and spiritually uplifting instruction. Earth Day“If you call, this entire universe around you is at your service. If you know who you are and what your relationship is with the universe, you can always call. Sometimes, you have no faith and you do not even believe that nature can help you. Nature is a woman, that’s why they call her ‘Mother Nature’. Nature is a giver, a helper, a true friend, a sustainer, and nothing but constant harmony. So, if you are an aware person, then you must learn an attitude, which you can do very systematically. Sometimes, you do not know what to do. All right, just relax and say, ‘What should I do?’ You immediately will find that Mother Nature, in the form of consciousness and awareness, will start talking to you.” 6/30/77 My feeling is that it is time to start consciously talking to our Mother, the natural world. This awareness of our life on Earth can be aided by taking care of our internal and external environments, with small and large actions. So, on this Earth Day, join me in making a resolution to be kind to our own nature and to our natural Mother - the beloved Earth. Nirvair Singh Khalsa

 

All the best with blessings, Nirvair Singh Khalsa CEO KRI

 

 

 

 


 


 

 

The Top Reasons to choose a KRI® Teacher Training Top Reason Have you decided to become an instructor of Kundalini Yoga as Taught by Yogi Bhajan®? If so, congratulations on making one of the most impactful decisions of your life. For Kundalini Yoga teacher training, KRI is the place to be. • The Only Official Authority KRI is THE ONLY institution commissioned and approved by Yogi Bhajan himself to provide Kundalini Yoga teacher trainings. • Personal Transformation More than a certificate and set of techniques, KRI training will evoke the positive transformation of your personal lifestyle and spiritual journey. • Authentic Community KRI is a diverse and inclusive community devoted to connecting, supporting, and co-creating. The 3HO International Kundalini Teachers Association (IKYTA) membership provides professional support, development, and networking. • Portal to Advancement An official KRI Level One teacher training is your starting point and prerequisite for advancement to the depths of the Level Two and Level Three training programs. Top ReasonIndividual Support Support is available each step of the way from dedicated, experienced, and spiritually mature teachers. • Safe & Ethical KRI upholds high standards in its CODE OF ETHICS and a zero tolerance policy. Any violation is reviewed and enforced by a third-party governing body. • Global Consistency You will find a consistent, top quality curriculum at any official KRI training, anywhere in the world. With a KRI licensed trainer, you can be sure that the program is aligned with Yogi Bhajan’s teachings. KRI Teacher Training programs can be found all over the world. Find a KRI Teacher Training near you!

 


 

 

Cover Your Head for Kundalini Yoga Back To Basics When practicing Kundalini Yoga, we always cover our head with a natural cloth, such as cotton. It can be a bandana, a cap, a wrap, a turban, or any style that covers the hair and head. This is done in reverence for the teachings but it is also a tradition that is rooted deeply in yogic technology. Through Kundalini Yoga, the practitioner trains to become aware of and master the subtle energies. Yogi Bhajan taught that the hair is alive and has an important energetic function, regulating the sun energy in the body system. By covering the head, the energy generated by the practice is contained within. It stabilizes the energy and allows it to collect in the region of the sixth and seventh chakras. The sixth chakra is at the third eye point, the point between the eyebrows, which is the seat of intuition. The seventh chakra is at the top of the head, and it is the connection to higher consciousness. By containing the energy generated during practice, it stabilizes the nervous system and opens the intuition. Cover Your HeadHere is what Yogi Bhajan said in 1997: "We are not asking everybody to tie a turban, what we are asking is for teachers to at least cover their heads. In old times, in any spiritual [tradition], Christianity, Judaism, Islam, they covered their heads. God has given the human hair on their heads for a purpose. Hair is a pure protein, a pure, heavy protein. Your gray matter and this pure, heavy protein is connected. This bunch of hair protects the solar centers in your skull. If you don't have any value for it, go and get them cut, it's okay. You shave your head, it's fine; but the caliber of your intuition will change. So what we want, when a person invokes the Divine, is that they should cover their head. Somebody asked, ‘What should I do? I am in a ski place. Can I put on a ski cap?’ I am not telling you to cover your head with a wood block, I am telling you to cover your head with anything available to you that can cover. It is fine with me." Covering the head provides a sense of containment and focus while doing any practice or work that requires clarity of thought. It literally helps "keep your head” together!

 

 


 

Do you want to immerse yourself in Sikh Dharma? Camp Miri Piri is for you! Camp Miri Piri Sikh Dharma is still a mystery for many people who practice Kundalini Yoga. If you have been yearning for a deep experience of Sikhism, Camp Miri Piri is for you. Camp Miri Piri is for and about Sikhs – five days of sharing the spiritual warrior experience. The camp is a celebration and a dedication to Guru Hargobind, the sixth Sikh Guru, who started the warrior tradition in Sikhism. He wore two swords, naming them “Miri” and “Piri”. These swords represented the balance between spiritual and worldly powers. This concept of the warrior-saint has permeated the Sikh philosophy and lifestyle ever since. The goal of Camp Miri Piri is to challenge you to connect to your soul in a deep way. Here, you will find recitation of the five morning Banis, a powerful group Sadhana, challenging physical training, and inspiring Sikh stories and meditation. You will gain an in-depth experience of Sikh values by balancing the mind, body, and spirit through the practice of Gurbani Kirtan, Kundalini Yoga, meditation, and warrior workouts, as well as classes to build healthy relationships.
June 7-11, 2019 at Hacienda de Guru Ram Das in Espanola, NM, USA
Join us in the midst of the mountains and blue skies of New Mexico where you and your family will have a chance to take a deep journey within to experience the identity of the spiritual warrior.
These camps are for adults, age 18 and older, however children are welcome and attend free when accompanied by a parent.

 

 


 

 

 

Celebrating Krishan Kaur’s 80th Birthday
Celebrating Krishan Kaur
Join KRI and all your friends in Los Angeles on May 4th to celebrate the amazing Krishan Kaur’s 80th birthday! It will be the party of the year and not to be missed! Click here for more information on Celebrate Krishna!

 

 

 


 

The Role of Yoga in Treating Inflammation: Getting in Line with Self-healing by Raj Kaur Khalsa (Naila Omar Khayyam Alieva), Ph.D. Sat Bir Singh Khalsa, Ph.D. Treating Inflammation Inflammation is a disordered physiological response or consequence of immune reactions to acute injury or a chronic condition and has been associated with a number of diseases. Inflammation involves local or global changes in blood vessels, nerves, and tissues with symptoms including pain, redness, immobility, swelling, and heat of the affected area. Additionally, inflammation of internal organs, often associated with chronic conditions, may also occur and could include fatigue, nausea, mouth sores, chest pain, abdominal pain, fever, rash, joint pain, sleep disturbance, depressive mood, irritability, and mild cognitive difficulties with attention and memory. Chronic inflammatory diseases are the most significant cause of death in the world. The World Health Organization (WHO) ranks chronic inflammatory diseases as the greatest threat to human health. Worldwide, three of five people die due to chronic inflammatory diseases like stroke, respiratory diseases, cardiovascular disorders, cancer, obesity, and diabetes. Inflammation is actually a defence mechanism in the body and a part of the body’s normal immune response. Infections, wounds, and any tissue damage would not be able to heal without an inflammatory response. In cases where harmful stimuli have not been removed and the inflammatory response has been maintained for a long period of time, the body develops chronic inflammation, which itself can eventually lead to disease conditions, including allergies, skin problems, and some cancers. Inflammation can also affect organs in so-called autoimmune diseases, in which the immune system attacks its own tissues as if they are threats to health. Examples of some autoimmune chronic inflammatory conditions include inflammation of the heart (myocarditis), kidney (nephritis), large intestine (colitis), and joints (rheumatoid arthritis). Diagnosis of acute or chronic inflammation involves blood examination to evaluate the increased level of several inflammatory biomarker molecules including gamma globulins, C-reactive protein and fibrinogen. Additionally, patients with chronic conditions would have additional biomarkers assessed, including pro-inflammatory cell-to-cell signalling cytokines, such as tumour necrosis factor alfa (TNF alfa), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1beta), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-8 (IL-8). In several research studies, up or down regulation of the expression level of several pro and anti-inflammatory transcription factors have also been assayed. Recently, the possibility of detecting salivary cytokines was assayed in several randomized controlled trails (RCTs), which provided promising results on non-invasive sampling among yoga practitioners even during practice (before and after breathing exercises, for instance). There are several lifestyle-related risk factors associated with the development of chronic inflammation, such as obesity, unhealthy diet, smoking, stress, and sleep disorders. Altogether these factors induce accumulation of chemically aggressive free radical molecules, an increase in visceral body fat, and higher production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. There are several conventional drugs currently available to treat both acute and chronic inflammatory conditions and/or reduce accompanied symptoms. Depending on the type and severity of symptoms, patients might be prescribed non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as naproxen, ibuprofen, aspirin, acetaminophens (paracetamol), and Tylenol (even though these only reduce pain without affecting the inflammation itself). In more severe cases corticosteroids, disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDS), and biological response modifiers (BRMs) might be administered. Anti-inflammatory treatments are prevalent in all known schools of traditional medicine, such as Ayurveda, Chinese medicine, and Russian herbal medicine. Known remedies include a root known as devils claw, the wood spider or grapple plant (Harpagophytum procumnens), the Hyssop plant, ginger, turmeric, and, in some cultures, cannabis. Behavioural strategies, including lifestyle and dietary changes and mind-body practices, provide another useful tool for treating inflammation. Recent reviews have summarized the research on the benefits of mind-body interventions (MBIs) such as yoga for reducing inflammation in acute and chronic conditions. Even though it is not completely clear how MBIs work at the molecular or cellular level, several hypotheses have been proposed based on recent research advances. First, it has been shown that MBIs reduce expression of gene activity involved in the inflammatory response that are induced by stress. Several studies indicate that these practices are associated with downregulation of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB) pathway, reduced signalling through the proinflammatory transcription factor NF-jB, increased activity of the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) family transcription factors, and upregulation of the glucocorticoid receptor gene. Potential mechanisms for these effects include alterations in neuroendocrine, neural, psychological, and behavioural processes. Second, yoga breathing exercises and meditation have been demonstrated to reduce pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1 beta, IL-6 and TNF-alfa and have a positive impact on depression, anxiety, cognition, and pain. Lastly, yoga and other practices are well known to directly stimulate the vagus nerve. It was found that an increase in vagal tone is correlated with the capacity to regulate the stress response and likely contribute to resilience and the mitigation of mood and anxiety symptoms, which ultimately might reduce inflammation symptoms. A significant number of RCTs have been conducted to address possible benefits of MBIs on inflammation status of both healthy and diseased individuals. A positive effect of a yoga-based lifestyle intervention was demonstrated in RCTs on groups of healthy individuals exposed to occupational hazards by three independent groups of researchers in India. There was only slight induction of pro-inflammatory factors observed after 12 weeks of regular yoga training as compared with a control group of non-yoga practitioners, in which the induction of proinflammatory factors was significantly higher. This suggests that regular practice of yoga can protect against inflammatory diseases and metabolic risk factors. Another example of the prophylactic role of yoga is from studies on metabolic syndrome (MetS), which is a well-known precondition associated with diabetes and cardiovascular diseases, defined by increased blood pressure, high blood sugar, excess body weight, and an increased level of numerous biochemical proinflammatory factors. In several recent RCTs conducted independently in Hong Kong and India, it was shown that MetS symptoms were decreased after 12 weeks of regular yoga practices in the study in India and after one year in Hong Kong. In India, healthier choices in diet (dietary interventions) were also included in the intervention. In both cases, it was concluded that yoga and dietary interventions may have an important role in prevention of inflammatory conditions. In the case of already developed pathologies, yoga might help to reduce post-treatment inflammation conditions and thereby expedite the healing process. In two independent yoga studies on breast cancer survivors (at Ohio State University (OSU) and the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA)), it was reported that there was reduced activity of NF-kB, increased anti-inflammatory transcription factors, increased proinflammatory cytokines and also improvements in symptoms such as persistent fatigue and vitality in the group assigned to 12 weeks of 90-minute twice weekly hatha (OSU) or Iyengar (UCLA) restorative yoga classes, as compared with the control group. Such improvements are valuable for this population, since cancer survivors are known to be more than twice as likely as individuals without a cancer history to have these symptoms associated with poor health and disability. Another example of yoga-based complementary/adjunct therapy is research on patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), which is a severe chronic inflammatory system disease affecting both psychological and physical health. Comorbid depression is an important psychosomatic factor in this condition, which negatively interferes with the process of recovery. In a recent study from the prestigious All India Institute of Medical Sciences in New Delhi comparing yoga plus RA medication versus RA medications only, the addition of yoga practice to conventional RA treatment re-established immunological tolerance, shown at the molecular and cellular level, along with a significant reduction in depression score. Significant improvements were observed in RA patients after just eight weeks of yoga practice that included, exercises, breathing, and meditation practices as compared with a control group. In summary, there is an increasing body of research evidence on the positive effect of yoga, other mind-body practices, yogic healthy lifestyle and diet on inflammatory conditions. Long-term yoga and meditation practitioners have been shown to exhibit stronger immediate gene expression changes as compared to short-term practitioners, which in turn evokes the downstream health benefits. However, the “Achilles’s heel” of any behavioural approach is its need for discipline, commitment, and active participation from the patient, in contrast with much of conventional allopathic medicine where drugs and treatments are usually administered to the patient. In this respect, the role of patient self-care and behavioural strategies is very important for success in addressing the widespread occurrence of inflammation and inflammatory conditions.

 

Naila Omar Khayyam Alieva Raj Kaur Naila Omar Khayyam Alieva (Raj Kaur), PhD, is yogi and scientist. She is a certified Kundalini yoga instructor and Gong sound therapy practitioner. Naila teaches Kundalini Yoga and organizes yoga events and workshops in Singapore. She is also an active research scientist at the Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, A*STAR, Singapore.

 

 

 

 

Sat Bir Singh Khalsa, Ph.D. Sat Bir Singh Khalsa, Ph.D. is the KRI Director of Research, Research Director for the Kripalu Center for Yoga & Health, and Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. He has practiced a Kundalini Yoga lifestyle since 1973 and is a KRI certified Kundalini Yoga instructor. He has conducted research on yoga for insomnia, stress, anxiety disorders, and yoga in public schools. He is editor in chief of the International Journal of Yoga Therapy and The Principles and Practice of Yoga in Health Care and author of the Harvard Medical School ebook Your Brain on Yoga.

 

 

 

 


 

 

Sat Nam from The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings® Library of Teachings Library of TeachingsApril brings very beautiful but windy weather here in New Mexico, a reminder that winter has passed and spring is here! April also brings Earth Day, a celebration of our beloved Mother Earth. As many of you know, Yogi Bhajan advocated for the environment at every opportunity. He encouraged everyone to take care of themselves and the earth in a conscientious way. Here’s an excerpt from Earth Day (April 22nd) in 1990. “Start looking at His creation as part of him. Start respecting it, and loving it, and start to be gentle and kind. You don't have to do any other exercise, you will be fine. Start seeing the spirit and soul of every human being. Look bright and beautiful and saintly - you represent God… Now, you are trying not to pollute yourself and not to pollute the earth. A consciousness has set in, a time has started, and there shall be growth. Mankind will live in nobility, peace, and tranquility and that's a reality. It's not anybody's affair, it is everybody's affair. We are all part of One and One is part of all. It's my prayer that we guide ourselves to that righteousness. My prayer and my request is that you have an obligation to create a lot of joy, a lot of happiness, and elevate yourself so that the pollution can be counteracted with a joy in the body and in beings, so that you can feel wonderful and healthy. With this blessing and these prayers, may your life be very fulfilled and noble. I wish you the best of luck. Be prosperous, be generous, be kind, and be compassionate. Walk like angels, complete and perfect, pure in your psyche, and God shall walk with you. Wahe Guru Ji Ka Khalsa. Wahe Guru Ji Ki Fateh.” Read the original lecture for more teachings on how to uplift our consciousness and better care for this precious earth. I love the reminder that our earth is an extension of God, just as we are a representation of God. To all of you who support this important work of preserving the teachings of Yogi Bhajan, we cannot thank you enough! Your endless support and generous gifts are keeping this resource growing and improving all the time.
Library of Teachings Donation
In Gratitude, Shabd Simran Shabd Simran Kaur Adeniji, Fundraising Coordinator The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings® Kundalini Research Institute Email: donations@kriteachings.org Find us on Facebook “The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachingswww.libraryofteachings.com

 

 

The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings® is a non-profit organization and all donations are tax deductible under IRS code 501(c)(3).

 

 


 

KRI April 2019 Specials KRIYA KRIYA Yoga Sets, Meditations & Classic Kriyas From the Early Years of Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan® • Challenging physical kriyas from the 1970s and 1980s • More than 100 Meditations, including Visualisations, Pranayams, Silent Meditations, and Meditations with Mantra • Includes Material from the “Intermediate Manual”, K.R.I.Y.A., Under the Blue Skies and More! Retail: Formerly $44.95 New lower everyday price: $39.95 Promo: $33.96

 


 

Man to Man
Man to Man A Journal of Discovery for the Conscious Man The Men’s Teachings of Yogi Bhajan, PhD Master of Kundalini Yoga “You can be what you want to be, but you can’t be what you wish to be. The time has come. We want to be, we should be, and we have to be—men.” –Yogi Bhajan No one has ever talked to men—about men—like this before! These no holds barred lectures tell a man how to master being a man. Everything you’ve always wanted to know is here: how to succeed as a man, how to communicate as a man, how to make love to the woman in your life, the relationship between sex and spirituality, potency and projection, consciousness and creativity... plus special foods, diets and exercises especially for men. Retail: $49.95 PROMO: $42.46

 


 

Foundations DVD Series
Foundations DVD Series Create a firm foundation for your yogic practice, and gain insight into what it takes to live as a Teacher of Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan with these essential lectures and meditations. Volume 1: The Purity and Power of a Teacher Volume 2: Get Rid of Anger and Fear Volume 3: Balance & the Law of Equality Volume 4: Use Your Body for Higher Living Volume 5: The Change of the Age Volume 6: Becoming a Sage in the Aquarian Age Volume 7: Emotional Compensation Retail: $19.95 per DVD Promo: $16.96 Or take advantage of our regular full set discount of all 7 DVDs for $108.00! KRI Newsletter April Recipe Yogi Bhajan’s Gobi Tamaatar— Spicy Cauliflower & Tomato Curry Excerpt from “From Vegetables, With Love: Recipes and Tales from a Yogi’s Kitchen (Revised and Expanded New Edition)” Siri-Ved Kaur Khalsa Yield: 8–10 servings This curried cauliflower dish tastes of Indian barbecue and is even more fantastic served with basmati rice and chapattis.
Gobi Tamaatar
⅓ cup ghee or oil 1 heaping teaspoon turmeric 2 onions, chopped 2 bulbs garlic, whole peeled cloves ¼ cup chopped fresh ginger 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon 1 teaspoon black pepper 1 heaping teaspoon crushed red chiles 1 teaspoon ground cloves 1 cup of water 6 tomatoes, peeled and quartered ¾ cup of malt vinegar 3 medium heads cauliflower cut into large bite-size pieces Tamari soy sauce or salt Heat oil in a large heavy saucepot or sauté pan over medium-high to high heat. Add turmeric and let sizzle for 10 seconds. Add onions, whole garlic cloves, and ginger. Sauté 2–3 minutes on a medium-high flame, stirring frequently. Add cinnamon, pepper, chiles, and cloves. Stir to combine and add water. Cook at least 5 minutes, adding more water as required to prevent scorching. Add tomatoes, vinegar, cauliflower, and tamari or salt. Add water as desired for a soupier consistency. Lower heat to medium and cook about 1 hour, uncovered, adding small amounts of water as needed, until the oil separates and the cauliflower is easily pierced with a fork.

 

 

Trainer’s Corner
Trainer’s Forum
What is a Trainer Forum? A Trainer Forum is a meeting place for open dialogue amongst members and applicants of the Aquarian Trainer Academy. It is an opportunity for professional development as a trainer, a time to come together as a community of trainers to refresh our spirit and revisit our values, build skills and share best practices, create new relationships and deepen existing ones. Key elements of every Trainer Forum include: Peer-to-Peer Meetings – network, connect, and share best practices and learned lessons Global Decision Making – share your voice and participate in hot topic discussions Workshops – interactive presentations on specialty areas led by both KRI and local trainers We look forward to seeing you at an upcoming Forum! For more information visit: http://trainersupport.kundaliniresearchinstitute.org/trainer-forum/ 2019 Trainer Forums: Culture, Communication, Community Summer Solstice: Hacienda de Guru Ram Das, Espanola, New Mexico New Times! June 12, 8:30a – 5:30p & June 13, 8:30a – 12:30p Register Here Europe: Chateau Anand, Saint Pierre de Maille, France New Times! July 25, 8:30a – 5:30p & July 26, 8:30am – 12:30p Register Here Australia: Australia Kundalini Yoga Festival October 7th, 6:00p – 9:00p & October 8, 9:00a – 6:00p China October 2019 – details TBA Winter Solstice: Hampton Inn, Lake Wales, Florida, December 14, 8:30a – 5:30p & December 15, 8:30a – 12:30p

 

KRI March Newsletter

News From KRI - March






Kundalini Research Institute The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings Endowment Fund

SUPPORT THE KUNDALINI RESEARCH INSTITUTE & THE LIBRARY OF TEACHINGS Library of Teachings Donation





A Note From Nirvair

Summer Solstice

Sat Nam. Greetings from New Mexico! Spring will bloom for us in a few weeks when the vernal equinox balances light and dark. It is a time of renewal, realizing the strength in optimism, and an opportunity to leave the winter behind.

With the sun getting warmer and the days getting longer, we at KRI® get excited because it means summer is coming! June, July, and August is when we welcome you into our home and host the summer programs in Espanola at Hacienda de Guru Ram Das once again. Don’t miss out – this could be your summer in New Mexico!

This is the Summer Issue of our KRI newsletter, and it is devoted to giving you a sneak-peek into our summer programs and trainings. The summer starts with Camp Miri Piri on June 7th – 11th followed by the incredible Summer Solstice Sadhana Celebration at Ram Das Puri, June 13th -22nd.

June 8th – 11th is the Level Three Mela, an inspiring personal journey to Self-Realization. For Level Two Practitioners, it is the next step in refining and evolving your identity as a Teacher. June 12th and 13th will be the Summer Solstice Trainer Forum, an exciting meeting of trainers from all over the world to discuss current issues and share insights. Immediately after Summer Solstice Sadhana, the KRI programs continue. June 23rd – June 30th is Level Two Vitality & Stress, one of the five modules of Level Two. And in August, we host the Level One Teacher Training Immersion program August 3rd – 30th, 28 amazing days of growth, expansion, and inspiration.



At whatever level you join, you will be challenged, inspired, and given the opportunity to gain the experience and tools you need to keep yourself in balance and help those around you. Dive in the deep-end and be the person you want to be - become a teacher. If you are already KRI-certified, support your growth and continue to expand!

KRI Seal of Approval for qualified Specialty Courses
KRI supports your ability to spread of the Teachings of Yogi Bhajan® and Kundalini Yoga as Taught by Yogi Bhajan® in as many ways as possible. There is a system in place to request approval of yoga manuals, books, CDs, DVDs, research articles, website content, on-line products, and translations of existing KRI products. Now, qualified Specialty Courses can earn the KRI Seal of Approval. Find out how to get your course approved here, and check out the courses that have already been approved.

Nirvair Singh Khalsa
All the best in all ways. Happy Spring, and I look forward to seeing you this summer!
Nirvair Singh Khalsa
CEO KRI




 




Level One Immersion Training in New Mexico - This is Your Summer!

KRI Level One
Finding connections with kindred spirits is one of the greatest blessings of life. Becoming a Kundalini Yoga instructor opens the door of awareness and connects you to a vibrant community of consciousness. It will transform your life and impact everyone around you. Join KRI this summer and become a Certified Instructor of Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan®.

If you have ever felt the urge to be a teacher, this is your summer to finally dive in the deep-end. Whether you wish to deepen your personal practice of Kundalini Yoga or long to become a certified Kundalini Yoga Instructor, your journey begins here.

This 28-day residential program in beautiful New Mexico is an amazing opportunity to study with Trainers who learned directly from Yogi Bhajan. Following the residential portion, you will continue your training for five months – studying, collaborating with a small group, and practicing a daily meditation. It is a life-changing experience! Here are some powerful things you’ll take away from Teacher Training Immersion this summer:

  1. A solid foundation in the technology of kriya and meditation – You will study the theory and practice of Kundalini Yoga kriyas (yoga sets), asanas, and mudras. You will learn Kundalini Yoga meditations, mantras, and pranayam (breathing techniques) and experience the power of this technology.
  2. An experience of the yogic lifestyle – Living for 28 days in an ashram will give you a deep connection to the teachings and the experience of yogic life. You will learn the history and tradition of Kundalini Yoga, as well as the underlying philosophy behind all yogic practices. Living a clean and simple lifestyle - meditating in the early morning and eating a vegetarian diet of wholesome and delicious food - will make a big impact on your consciousness.
  3. A practical grasp of basic anatomy and physiology – We study traditional Western anatomy, its purpose and function, as well as Yogic anatomy and the energy systems of the body. This essential knowledge will build your proficiency as a yoga instructor and help you fully understand how yoga affects the human body.
  4. An understanding of the skills and techniques to become a successful yoga instructor – You learn the business side of yoga, preparing you for your next steps in life. The topics including practical strategies for teaching beginners, ethical guidelines, curriculum development, and the transformational role of the teacher in developing a successful yoga practice.
  5. An authentic connection to the source of the teachings – You experience the Master’s Touch through DVD classes led by Yogi Bhajan and a personal connection with teachers who studied directly from him. Although Yogi Bhajan left this earth in 2004, at Hacienda de Guru Ram Das, his energy is still strong and felt by those who come here to learn.
  6. And finally, the skill and confidence to teach your own Kundalini Yoga class – There is a lot to learn before you can sit before a class of students and guide them through a Kundalini Yoga class. As you connect deeply to the teachings, day-by-day, you gain the understanding and knowledge to teach and serve others. During the Immersion, you will practice teaching your peers, and you will learn from each other’s classes until you are ready to teach on your own. Experience the personal healing that comes when you explore the depths of this amazing technology. Together, with others who share your lifestyle and your passion for yoga and meditation, you will grow in ways you cannot imagine. This summer, leave nothing to chance. Come to New Mexico, and become a Certified Instructor of Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan.



The Aquarian Teacher, KRI Level One Teacher Training Program
August 3 - August 30, 2019
Espanola, New Mexico, USA
http://immersion.kundaliniresearchinstitute.org
Important Note: Fulfillment of the program certification requirements continues through February 2020

 




Vitality & Stress – Level Two Training in Espanola
by Ravi Kaur AKYTTSA Lead Trainer, South Africa

Level Two After the experience of Level One training, you inevitably start to change and evolve as a person and as a teacher. That is the power of this amazing technology! Level Two Teacher Training will deliver you to the next step in your personal development.

Level 2 programs are transformational; the depth and breadth of the teachings combined with the wisdom and experience of the trainers create experiences that always leave students wanting more. This Level 2 module, Vitality & Stress, given by Yogi Bhajan, is particularly applicable to these Aquarian times. It gives you vital tools with which to soothe your soul and create in you a calm, vitalized strength to live your life with courage, as a Spiritual Warrior. The vibration of Hacienda de Guru Ram Das holds you, as a mother's embrace, as you traverse the paths of your karmas and find the answers to your soul's quest of how to live your life as a legacy.

Join us June 23 - June 30, 2019, in Espanola to learn the tools of creative living. This program is an opportunity for you to explore and uplift your internal energy and come to the realization that your own higher consciousness is actually the core and source of vitality.

Give yourself seven empowering days immersed in Kundalini Yoga and Meditation. Experience the beauty of morning sadhana at Hacienda de Gur Ram Das, delicious yogic meals, and the special energy of this unique place. Surrounded with the peaceful environments of sacred community, you will:

  • Explore your own vitality and the importance this energy holds in your life.
  • Identify your stress points, understand how this decreases your vitality, and learn ways to mitigate stress.
  • Heal cold depression and emotional fatigue in yourself and others.
  • Understand the path of the Spiritual Warrior and claim the victory!
  • Be confident to teach and incorporate these ideas in your classes.


Experience this powerful training in Espanola, where Yogi Bhajan lived and taught. Join Lead Trainer Deva Kaur from Florida USA, Devinder Kaur from Canada, Ravi Kaur from South Africa, and Nirvair Singh from KRI for what promises to be a wonderful transformational experience.

Ravi Ravi Kaur is a Kundalini Yoga Therapist and healer in South Africa. She is a Family Constellations facilitator and uses this method to reveal states of illness in the individual and family lineage. She works in rehabilitation centers for recovery from substance abuse as a counselor, and in counseling centers that address violence towards women and HIV/AIDS. Ravi is an internationally certified systems coach and works with couples and families. As a doula, she accompanies women from conception to weaning in their journey of motherhood. Ravi is currently writing a dissertation on the experiences of pregnant women with PTSD who do yoga therapy.

The Aquarian Teacher, KRI Level Two Teacher Training Program
Transformation: Vitality & Stress
June 23 - June 30, 2019
Espanola, New Mexico, USA
http://transformation.kundaliniresearchinstitute.org

KRI Level One Certification is a prerequisite for Level Two.
Vitality & Stress is one of five modules required for KRI Level Two Practitioner certification.





Are You Ready for Level Three? - Begin Your Journey to Self-Realization

Level Three


The KRI Level Three Program is a 1,000-day personal journey to Self-Realization in which we refine our identity as a Teacher and deepen our unique relationship to the Sacred. Level Three focuses on the three qualities of a Teacher: Spiritual Maturity, Meditative Mind, and Seva.

"...You get a really deep experience of yourself as reflected through your peer group, and you get a deep reflection of yourself through your own thousand-day meditation practice... And then you get to express yourself through your Seva legacy and it really gets to be something that's you, that you didn't even know was you when you began the legacy Seva."


Level Three participants have said that this program was just what they were looking for in their development as a teacher. The commitment of Level Three, and the support from a community of peers, propels you in your inner evolution. Here are ten good reasons to consider Level Three: 1. Expand Yourself. You teach and serve others every day. Now, it is your turn to work on yourself and expand your spirit.
2. Revitalize your Spirit. Rejuvenate yourself and fill your cup with light, love, and good energy.
3. Nurture your Heart. Grow your capacity to love though meditation and self-assessment.
4. Cultivate your Spiritual Maturity. Commit to a 1,000-day journey of self-realization and spiritual growth that will expand your consciousness and deepen your self-mastery.
5. Develop your Meditative Mind. Dive deeply into inner awareness and self-reflection, expanding your capacity for meditation to new heights.
6. Serve your World. Align your individual passion and purpose with a higher destiny to build communities and serve the greater good.
7. Discover the Power of Spiritual Support. Experience positive support and genuine trust with a group of your peers who walk with you each step of the 1,000-day sadhana.
8. Connect to your Teacher. Immerse yourself in the teachings of Yogi Bhajan and discover new ways that this wisdom can penetrate and change your life.
9. Intensify your Teaching. Deepen your teaching ability and learn a wealth of knowledge and inspiration that can be shared with all your students.
10. Answer your Soul’s Calling. Be the teacher that you are destined to be, and make this your summer to start the journey towards being a Level Three teacher.

"In KRI's Level Three program, one becomes a teacher, a teacher of truth and spirit. You develop the ability to penetrate and communicate through your presence alone and uplift students through your subtle body. This is the teacher of the Aquarian Age, the Aquarian Teacher. Students experience the truth within themselves through your intention, projection, and purity. ...Remember - as a Teacher, anything and everything you do must upgrade the other person." Yogi Bhajan, 1996

New applications to start the Level Three journey will be accepted beginning this fall.

Already enrolled in Level Three? Revitalize your spirit, expand your heart, and join us this summer for the Mela!
REGISTER FOR THE US MELA: June 8 - 11, 2019
Hacienda de Guru Ram Das, Espanola, New Mexico

REGISTER FOR THE EU MELA: July 21 - 24, 2019
Chateau Anand, France

For more information about Level Three training, visit Level Three at the KRI website.
“All aspects of my L3 experience have been personally beneficial and affirming, as well as useful in creating connection with people from many places and spaces."
The Aquarian Teacher, KRI Level Three Teacher Training Program 2019 MELA Dates & Locations The annual gathering for Level Three participants June 8th – 11th in Espanola, New Mexico, USA July 21st – 24th in Chateau Anand, France For more information: LevelThree.KundaliniResearchInstitute.org Email: LevelThree@kriteachings.org





 

Calling All Trainers in Training!

Are you in the process of becoming a trainer? Are you available to immerse yourself in the process of personal growth as a trainer? Then, the Trainer in Training Program (TNT) in Espanola this summer will be perfect for you!

At the Immersion, TNTs support students through their development into a Level One Kundalini Yoga Instructor, while receiving training themselves from KRI Senior Trainers such as Sat Siri Kaur, Siri Neel Kaur, Adarsh Kaur, Dev Suroop Kaur, and Nirvair Singh. Join us this summer in New Mexico, the land of enchantment that Yogi Bhajan called “God’s true home.”

During the program, TNTs participate in all aspects of Level One including:
  • Attending a 5-day Training Week with the staff, concentrating on developing individual and team growth,
  • Meeting each morning with the TNT Coordinator for support and coaching,
  • Facilitating a group of students from the beginning of the training through certification,
  • Participating in the 2.5 hour “Long Ek Ong Kaar” meditation in honor or Yogi Bhajan’s birthday,
  • Gathering with people from around the world as we celebrate the Life and Legacy of Yogi Bhajanat the Ranch on Yogi Bhajan’s birthday,
  • Practicing Aquarian Group Sadhana with the students and the sangat of Hacienda de Guru Ram Das, and
  • Being a part of the diverse and experienced Immersion Program Team.


Many TNTs go on to become Lead Trainers and bring Kundalini Yoga Teacher Training to their respective countries. Are you next?!

Click here for more information on the Trainer in Training Program.

This is a wonderful opportunity – don’t miss it!

Back to Basics with Kundalini Yoga

More on the Mangala Charan Mantra – Chant Before you Drive!

Miri Piri AcademyAs we covered last month, the Mangala Charan mantra, the open lines of the Sukhmani Sahib written by Guru Arjan Dev ji, are an important part of our spiritual practice - Aad Guray Nameh, Jugad Guray Nameh, Sat Guray Nameh, Siri Guru Devay Nameh. Yogi Bhajan described the Mangala Charan as a kavach bund. “Kavach” is the suit of armor that the warriors of old wore in battle, and “bund” is a yogic energy lock.

In 1989 at Khalsa Women’s Training Camp, he explained:
“Kavach bund is what protects you from four sides. Kavach is the most powerful defensive thing you can wear around your body so that you cannot be [hurt in an] attack, and this [Mangala Charan mantra] is a kavach bund. It can conquer death.”

What better time to use this mantra then before driving a car! On May 28, 1981, Yogi Bhajan said in a Los Angeles lecture, “When you start a car, you should chant, 'Aad Guray Nameh, Jugad Guray Nameh, Sat Guray Nameh, Siri Guru Devay Nameh. Wahe Guru Ji Ka Khalsa, Wahe Guru Ji Ki Fateh.'

“It takes about twelve seconds, between twelve and fifteen. You can chant it quick or you can chant it slow. Now, what are these fifteen seconds for? Why is it obligatory to chant? First, it is so you remember the four Gurus; it's a protection, you salute them, and you ask for their protection. So, it is called kavach. It is called a kavach mantra. A kavach mantra surrounds you with the radiance of protection.

“There was a time in the world when everything was healed by mantra, everything was created by mantra, and everything was destroyed by mantra. Ultimately, our science will reach that point, again. I am saying it today. It looks very odd to you, but it is going to be that way again one day. There was a time on this earth when mantra ruled. So, we say a mantra to protect ourselves, a kavach mantra. It means that we are protected. There is a radiance around us, and we are covered by it…

“[If you chant the Mangala Charan mantra before driving,] according to time, you are fifteen seconds later. Now, what is the science behind this mantra? Scientifically, if you want to explain it, [chanting that mantra] makes you fifteen seconds late from the spot of an accident.” What a powerful and beautiful mantra of protection! Remember the Mangala Charan mantra, and use it to safeguard yourself and those you love.




LOL: Laughter Yoga for Health and Therapy by Nikhil Ramburn and Sat Bir Singh Khalsa, Ph.D

Parkinson’s Disease Laughter is a physical reaction seen in humans and some other primates, usually consisting of rhythmic, often audible, contractions of the diaphragm and other parts of the respiratory system. It is a response to an external or internal stimulus and involves different neurological mechanisms than talking, with laughter being under weaker voluntary control than speech. Recently, several physiological and psychological benefits of so-called laughter therapy have been discovered. It appears that laughter reduces the level of stress hormones such as cortisol and epinephrine, while on the other hand, increases endogenous endorphins which activate the body’s opiate receptors for positive euphoric feelings and health-promoting effects. Laughter also improves immune function as shown by increases in the number of T-lymphocytes and white blood cells in the body. In addition, laughing reduces blood pressure by controlling vasoconstriction and relaxing blood vessels. On the psychological level, laughter therapy helps reduce mood disturbance including unpleasant feelings of tension, anxiety, hatred, and anger while alleviating stress and depression possibly through altering dopamine and serotonin activity. Laughter can also enhance interpersonal relationships and reduce insomnia, memory failure, and dementia.

It seems humor and laughter may prove to be useful as a clinical intervention. As a behavioral strategy, laughter therapy does not require specialized facilities or equipment and is easily accessible to patients who may have severe restrictions due to illness. In an attempt to better understand the role of humor in improving wellbeing amongst patients suffering from life-limiting illness, researchers at the University of Bonn in Germany conducted a systematic review of 13 humor interventions or assessments in palliative care. Despite limitations in both quantity and quality of studies, the evidence suggests that humor is indeed an appropriate and useful resource in palliative care with one of the key benefits being an increased pain tolerance, which results in a reduced need for pain medication and its negative consequences and side effects.

Laughter yoga is a modification of laughter therapy. The key pioneer of laugher yoga, Dr. Madan Kataria, recognized the potential behavioral and clinical benefits of laughter and started a laughter club in Mumbai, India during his time there as a medical student. Dr. Kataria was aware of the potential of yoga to facilitate laughter, including the similarities between yogic breathing (pranayama) exercises and laughter. He is largely responsible for spreading laughter yoga (LY) across the globe into general public and health care settings. A recent systematic review of the literature, evaluating studies published from 1995 to 2017, aimed to assess the mental health outcomes of LY. The researchers analyzed six experimental studies, all delivered in a group format with warm-up exercises, deep breathing exercises, a childlike playfulness, and laughter exercises. This systematic approach mirrors LY. The findings revealed that the most promising effect of laughter yoga was the improvement in depressive symptoms. Unfortunately, the relatively lower quality of research in this new field is at present insufficient to allow for the evidence to justify drawing strong conclusions in support of LY’s impact on mental health when compared to other group interventions.

Nonetheless, several newer studies have shown encouraging psychophysiological changes after LY practice. In a randomized controlled trial (RCT) study, one hundred and twenty (120) healthy university students were allocated to either LY, watching a comedy movie (which elicited spontaneous laughter), or reading a book. The LY program lasted thirty (30) minutes and was conducted in a group setting where a laughter leader assisted the subjects in simulated laughter and yogic breathing. Researchers found that cortisol levels (a stress hormone) and the cortisol / dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) ratios (a counterbalancing hormone to cortisol) significantly decreased in both the LY and comedy movie groups suggesting decreased stress levels and positive psychophysiological benefits. However, the effect of spontaneous laughter (movie group) on the cortisol dynamics lasted longer than that of LY suggesting greater psychophysiological benefits from spontaneous laughter than the laughter in LY. In another recent study of longer duration, participants took part in a 45-minute LY session once per month for six months. Repeated sessions appeared to have many psychological benefits as measured by a Profile of Mood States questionnaire. The participants reported less anxiety and more vigor, and their blood samples (drawn at each session) showed decreased adrenocorticotropic hormone and cortisol values, which related to the participants’ significant decrease in stress after the fourth LY session.

Another study of thirty-eight (38) male nursing students from the Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery at the Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in Iran found that LY was associated with improvement in sleep disorders, reduced anxiety and depression, and increased social function. Apart from the psychological benefits noted previously, studies also indicated that LY has physical benefits, such as the increased demand on trunk muscles which play a key role in stabilizing the spine. One study compared the activation of trunk muscles in LY with crunch and back lifting exercises. Researchers measured surface electromyography of five trunk muscles and found that LY resulted in greater activation of the internal oblique muscle, and the external oblique activation was comparable with crunch and back lifting exercises. Overall, laughter seems to be a good activator of trunk muscles but further research is required to determine whether LY exercises can improve neuromuscular recruitment and improve spine stability, a faculty which can deteriorate with age.

In elderly populations, LY practice may provide several benefits in addition to trunk muscle engagement. Older adults in residential care commonly face elevated risks of depression. Researchers from the Allameh Tabatabai University in Tehran, Iran set out to determine how LY and exercise therapy could impact depression scores. Seventy (70) depressed elderly women were randomized into LY, exercise or a control group. The LY group received a brief talk about something delightful like national and religious ceremonies and having positive attitudes to everyday life affairs before participating in the LY exercises. The results of the study revealed a significant decrease in depression scores of both the LY and exercise groups in comparison to the control group. In addition, the LY group showed a significant increase in life satisfaction compared to the control group, whereas the exercise group showed no such improvement. Despite the encouraging findings, this study has come under criticism for eliciting positive emotions at the outset of the program, even before the laughter exercises began. A more recent study from the La Trobe University in Melbourne found physiological benefits in twenty-eight (28) elderly residents in residential care homes. In that study, LY was associated with lower blood pressure and improved mood, both of which can have positive downstream effects on cardiovascular health.

Finally, LY may prove to be a useful complementary therapy for cancer patients. Since cancer is usually accompanied by considerable stress, it is conceivable that LY could relieve the cancer patients’ stress before chemotherapy. Indeed, researchers found that LY was able to decrease stress in thirty-seven (37) cancer patients at the Shohada Tajrish Hospital in Iran before their chemotherapy. Since stress meaningfully increases cancerous cell activity and causes the involved cells to resist chemotherapy, LY may prove an important complement in the treatment of cancer.

In summary, the current body of research evidence suggests that LY is effective and scientifically supported as a stand-alone or complementary therapy. Although, further research is needed to fully understand the mechanisms underpinning the somewhat forced laughter in LY and its physiological differences to spontaneous laughter. Future research should avoid combining positive-emotion-inducing factors such as prompts about a positive attitude with LY and measure mood at baseline and post intervention in larger population sizes. An upcoming RCT by the Hong Kong Polytechnic University aims to determine the feasibility of using an LY intervention on patients with major depressive disorder, in which seventy-two (72) community dwelling people with co-morbid symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress will be recruited into the study and randomized into either the LY group or a treatment-as-usual group. Undoubtedly, such research studies will continue and hopefully add to the positive findings to date.

Nikhil Rayburn Nikhil Rayburn grew up practicing yoga under mango trees in the tropics. He is a certified Kundalini Yoga teacher and has taught yoga to children and adults in Vermont, New Mexico, Connecticut, India, France, and Mauritius. He is a regular contributor to the Kundalini Research Institute newsletter and explores current yoga research.


Sat Bir Singh Khalsa, Ph.D. Sat Bir Singh Khalsa, Ph.D. is the KRI Director of Research, Research Director for the Kripalu Center for Yoga & Health, and Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. He has practiced a Kundalini Yoga lifestyle since 1973 and is a KRI certified Kundalini Yoga instructor. He has conducted research on yoga for insomnia, stress, anxiety disorders, and yoga in public schools. He is editor in chief of the International Journal of Yoga Therapy and The Principles and Practice of Yoga in Health Care and author of the Harvard Medical School ebook Your Brain on Yoga.

 

 

 

 


 

KRI Specials for March 2019 Kundalini Yoga Sadhana GuidelinesKundalini Yoga Sadhana Guidelines 2nd Edition Create Your Daily Spiritual Practice Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan In this 2nd Edition of Kundalini Yoga Sadhana Guidelines, you’ll find steps toward cultivating the consciousness available by practicing in a group as well as suggestions for developing your own personal sadhana. Open these pages and begin the journey of a lifetime. New to this edition: • A comprehensive history of the sadhanas Yogi Bhajan gave over the years • The Aquarian Sadhana: the core of our practice • New illustrations by Harijot Kaur • Several new meditations and kriyas Retail: $29.95 Promo: $25.46

 


 

The Master’s TouchThe Master’s Touch On Being a Sacred Teacher for the New Age Yogi Bhajan, Master of Kundalini Yoga This book is for every student of Truth. Whatever path you have chosen, it will give you an understanding of the true meaning of mastery. In this superb collection of teachings from his “Master’s Touch” teacher training program, Yogi Bhajan, one of the most pragmatic spiritual Teachers of our time, explains the path of the Teacher. He does it with wit, compassion, and a practical sense of the challenges of daily life. Retail: $49.95 Promo: $42.46

 


 

The Master’s Touch The Master’s Touch Video and Lecture DVD Series Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan® On Being a Sacred Teacher for the New Age This is for every teacher of Kundalini Yoga as Taught by Yogi Bhajan® and for anyone on the spiritual path. In July of 1996 and April of 1997, Yogi Bhajan did what he loved best - trained Kundalini Yoga teachers - in Master's Touch programs in Española, New Mexico and Assisi, Italy. His enthusiasm for this, his stated mission, is apparent in the compelling lectures from these lectures, which make up this masterpiece of instructive wisdom. Yogi Bhajan told the student-teachers, "You are born to be a Teacher and shall teach, but in His Name, and to all, big and small." The class meditated daily with Yogi Bhajan to develop these attributes and more: Tuning into Your Aura, Meditate on Your Self as a Yogi, Discover the Beauty & Heaven Within, Experience the Essence of a Teacher, Develop the Guidance of the Soul, Healing Breath Formula, Elevated Caliber of a Spiritual Teacher, and Opening the Lock of the Heart Center. Yogi Bhajan, Master of Kundalini Yoga Volume One: The Golden Rules of a Teacher Volume Two: Overcoming the Complexes of Life Volume Three: The Grace of Kundalini Yoga Volume Four: The Teacher & the Student Volume Five: Descending God & Ascending Human Volume Six: Projecting as a Teacher Volume Seven: A Self Surrender to the Higher Self Volume Eight: Trouble Comes into Your Life When You Ask for It Regular Price per DVD: $19.95 Promo per DVD: $16.96 You can also get the entire 8 Volume Set for the everyday discounted price of $119.70!

KRI Newsletter March Recipe

Mediterranean Roasted Vegetable Orzo with Chick Peas
From Sat Kartar Singh, KRI Head Chef for the Espanola Level One Immersion
Makes 6-8 Servings

Mediterranean Roasted Vegetable Orzo with Chick Peas The Vegetables
1 small eggplant, peeled and ¾-inch diced
1 yellow bell pepper, 1-inch diced
1 red bell pepper, 1-inch diced
1 fennel bulb
1 red onion, peeled and 1-inch diced
2 garlic cloves, minced
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1½ teaspoons kosher salt
½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. Toss the eggplant, bell peppers, fennel, onion, and garlic with olive oil, salt, and pepper on a large sheet pan. Roast for 40 minutes, until browned, turning once with a spatula. The Orzo 1 medium red onion
2 tablespoons fennel seeds
3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
½ pound orzo pasta

Sautee one red onion and 2 tablespoons fennel seed in 3 tablespoons olive oil – slow and low, developing a caramelized flavor. Boil ½ pound orzo separately until al dente, then toss with onion and fennel seed sauté mixture.

The Chickpeas (Garbanzo Beans)
1 clove garlic
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1 can (15 oz.) cooked chickpeas
1 tablespoon tahini paste (sesame seed paste)

Slow roast garlic in 2 tablespoons olive oil. Add 16 oz cooked chickpeas and stir in 1 tablespoon tahini.

Mediterranean Flavor Layer Mix
4 scallions, minced (white and green parts)
¼ cup pinole (pine nuts), toasted
¾ pound good feta, ½-inch diced (not crumbled)
15 fresh basil leaves, cut into julienne

The Dressing
1/3 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice (2 lemons)
¼ cup extra virgin olive oil
1 teaspoon kosher salt
½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Whisk all ingredients together.

To the Plate
First layer the orzo, then chickpeas, next vegetables, then the flavor layer. Repeat, ending with the flavor layer. Decorate the plate with dressing in a circle. Garnish with fennel frawns.

Sat’s Secrets
Many people are sensitive to the alkaloids in nightshades, like the peppers and eggplant in this recipe. Their bodies react with inflammation or allergy-like symptoms. Avoid these vegetables in this recipe if you think you are sensitive. Replacements could be butternut squash, okra, or halved baby artichokes.

Fennel seeds and bulbs are great digestive aids.


Trainer’s Corner
Trainer’s Forum
What is a Trainer Forum? A Trainer Forum is a meeting place for open dialogue amongst members and applicants of the Aquarian Trainer Academy. It is an opportunity for professional development as a trainer, a time to come together as a community of trainers to refresh our spirit and revisit our values, build skills and share best practices, create new relationships and deepen existing ones. Key elements of every Trainer Forum include: Peer-to-Peer Meetings – network, connect, and share best practices and learned lessons Global Decision Making – share your voice and participate in hot topic discussions Workshops – interactive presentations on specialty areas led by both KRI and local trainers We look forward to seeing you at an upcoming Forum! For more information visit: http://trainersupport.kundaliniresearchinstitute.org/trainer-forum/ 2019 Trainer Forums: Culture, Communication, Community Summer Solstice: Hacienda de Guru Ram Das, Espanola, New Mexico New Times! June 12, 8:30a – 5:30p & June 13, 8:30a – 12:30p Register Here Europe: Chateau Anand, Saint Pierre de Maille, France New Times! July 25, 8:30a – 5:30p & July 26, 8:30am – 12:30p Register Here Australia: Australia Kundalini Yoga Festival October 7th, 6:00p – 9:00p & October 8, 9:00a – 6:00p China October 2019 – details TBA Winter Solstice: Hampton Inn, Lake Wales, Florida, December 14, 8:30a – 5:30p & December 15, 8:30a – 12:30p

 

KRI February Newsletter

News From KRI - February




Kundalini Research Institute The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings Endowment Fund
SUPPORT THE KUNDALINI RESEARCH INSTITUTE & THE LIBRARY OF TEACHINGS Library of Teachings Donation

 


 

A Note From Nirvair Blood Moon Sat Nam. Greetings from New Mexico. Wow, it is cold here – I know that many of you think of New Mexico as sunny and warm, but this winter has been full of snowfall. And how about that blood moon in late January! It was a beautiful sight in the clear skies, an other-worldly shade of red caused by the eclipse. And speaking of the color red, February means Valentine’s Day, and that brings us the topic of “love”. Yogi Bhajan, in his years of teaching, had some wonderful perspectives on love. His message always boiled down to one concept. He said on June 15, 1994, “Don’t forget, human love is only for one thing, to love your soul. Then, the infinite world around you will be in love with you.” On Valentine’s Day, 1996 he said, “Today is a Valentine’s Day. It has a lot of story behind it, but basically, it is a day of love. Somebody became a saint [because his] love was infinite. [So now,] we send each other cards, ‘Be my Valentine’ [or] ‘I am your Valentine.’ [In truth,] we are the Valentine. Why can't we be a Valentine of each other every day? Why don’t we have a fixed frequency? Why not? We are actually Valentines of each other.” During this lecture, there was a fantastic Kriya. Practice this Kriya directly from this lecture with Yogi Bhajan in the Library of Teachings. It is great for “breaking your fatigue!” Valentine's DayEven though it is winter now, at KRI we know that summer is coming! (No dragons and no white-walkers, here.) Registration is open for our Level One Teacher Training Immersion in New Mexico and Level Two Vitality and Stress. These are great programs that will lift your spirits and open your heart! I really hope that if you are considering becoming a teacher In Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan®, that you will join us this August. And if you are already a Level One certified instructor, consider staying after Summer Solstice Sadhana for the new and revised Level Two “Vitality and Stress” program. A lot of work has gone into the V&S 2.0 revision, and we are really excited about its debut this summer. We have a new column starting this month – Back to Basics with Kundalini Yoga. It is a look at some of our foundational skills and principles to help sharpen and focus your teaching skills and daily practice. If there is a subject that you’d like us to cover, reach out and let us know. I hope you enjoy revisiting these essentials and that it serves you.

 

Nirvair Singh Khalsa All the best with blessings, Nirvair Singh Khalsa CEO KRI

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Parkinson’s Disease and the Research on the Efficacy of Yoga by Nikhil Ramburn and Sat Bir Singh Khalsa, Ph.D Parkinson’s Disease Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurological disorder that is characterized by tremors, stiffness, or slow movement, although symptoms may vary greatly in patients. Symptoms may begin on one side of the body and worsen on that side, even when the symptoms are bilateral. Risk factors for the disease include exposure to certain environmental toxins, old age and having a relative with PD. In fact, researchers have identified specific genetic mutations that cause PD, but these are uncommon except in the rare cases of family members affected by the disease. Nearly one million Americans will be living with PD by 2020, and men are 1.5 times more likely to have PD than women. In PD, certain neurons in the brain gradually break down or die and many symptoms are due to the loss of those neurons, which are responsible for the production of a chemical messenger called dopamine. Clumps of microscopic substances within brain cells called Lewy bodies are also an important marker of the disease. Conventional pharmacotherapy treatment is symptomatic and either increases or substitutes for dopamine. Although medications help patients manage their problems with movement and control the tremors, the efficacy of the drugs diminish over time, and side effects include hallucinations, swelling, impaired urination, and compulsive behaviors. Since there is currently no proven pharmacological therapy that can modify or halt the progression of PD, physical exercise may be a viable complement to manage the inherent decline of the disease. Recent evidence suggests that patients with PD who exercise might experience motor benefits such as improved mobility, balance, and gait velocity as well as non-motor improvements in mood, sleep, cognition, and quality of life. Other complementary therapies such as massage, acupuncture, deep brain stimulation, gene therapy, and herbal treatments may offer similar motor and non-motor benefits and alleviate some drug-induced side effects. In fact, over 50 percent of PD patients in the US use complementary or alternative therapies in addition to, or instead of, conventional treatment. Yoga and meditation rank amongst the most highly used modalities. Notably, the perceived efficacy of meditation is striking, with 85 percent of patients finding this practice helpful in reducing symptoms of stress, tremor, muscle tightness, anxiety, and improving clarity of thought. Since yoga combines meditation and physical benefits of exercise and breath regulation, it may prove to be an effective complementary treatment to PD, certain to be at least as effective as meditation alone. In an early pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) at the University of Kansas, thirteen patients with mild and moderate stages of PD were randomly assigned to either a yoga intervention or a control group. The intervention consisted of twice-weekly sessions for 12 weeks. Researchers found that in as little as 6 weeks, the patients’ scores on the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), a clinical measure of health-¬related Quality of Life (QOL), was significantly improved. This improvement in UPDRS scores could be explained by improved motor symptoms such as decreased falls and improved balance as well as non-motor symptoms such as decreased anxiety and stress. Given the progressive nature of PD, the absence of deterioration of self-reported symptoms and improvements in clinical outcome scores suggest that yoga may be an effective intervention. Researchers from Joseph Signorile’s lab at the University of Miami set out to determine how yoga would compare to exercise. Forty-one (41) patients with PD were randomly assigned to a power training (PWT) intervention, a high-speed yoga program, or a non-exercise control group. The yoga group practiced for one hour, twice per week for 12 weeks, and participants held a static pose for one breath before quickly transitioning to the subsequent poses in the series. The researchers found no differences between the yoga and the PWT group, but both programs significantly improved physical performance on a variety of outcome measures such as balance, walking speeds, and fall risks in older (60-90 years) PD patients. Another study from Signorile’s lab also found that three months of a Power Vinyasa yoga program was associated with increased speed of movement, less joint rigidity, increased muscle strength, and improved QOL scores. Given these findings and the exceptional level of exercise adherence, this form of power yoga could be a viable intervention to increase physical function in PD patients. Additional studies support the therapeutic use of yoga as a rehabilitation intervention for individuals with PD. In a 2018 pilot RCT, patients received an eight-week Hatha Yoga intervention which included postures, yogic breathing (pranayama), and meditation. In contrast to the previously mentioned research, the breathing in this intervention was slow and focused, and the postures were held for multiple breaths. The quantitative findings are consistent with previous studies such as improved balance, motor function, and gait. Furthermore, the additional qualitative reports acquired suggest improved home and community mobility, formation of new supportive relationships, and increased ease in dressing themselves. This study further supports including a yoga intervention as community-based rehabilitation for individuals with PD. Recent studies by Cheung et al. at the University of Minnesota focused on determining the safety and feasibility of yoga interventions for PD patients. Since increased risk of falling often accompany the progression of PD, Cheung et al. devised a 12-week intervention of twice-weekly yoga classes to address the unique concerns of the PD population. For example, postures focused on increasing the range of motion in the spine, hips, and shoulder girdles, which are particularly affected by the motor symptoms of PD. In addition, to improve balance and safety, all mats were positioned around the edges of the room next to the walls of the studio so that patients had an additional support for transitions and standing poses. The researchers deemed the program feasible with 90 percent of participants attending more than 75 percent of the classes and four out of 19 participants attended all the classes. Also, since no adverse events were reported, yoga therapists who seek to implement yoga for PD patients can consider the safety precautions employed in this intervention. In another study, they set out to determine the effect of yoga on oxidative stress since the latter plays an important role in the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in PD. Although the participants in the 12-week yoga intervention had good adherence and the participants reported that they “definitely enjoyed” the classes, there was no major difference in oxidative stress markers between the intervention and the control group. Despite these encouraging findings, further research with larger sample sizes is needed to uncover the underpinning mechanisms of the action of yoga and to determine the impact of yoga on oxidative stress in PD patients. An upcoming trial comparing yoga with stretching and resistance training was recently completed in March 2018. The primary outcome measure from this study will be the level of psychological distress measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and therefore help us broaden our understanding of yoga’s ability to address psychological distress among patients with chronic neurodegenerative illness.

 

Nikhil Rayburn Nikhil Rayburn grew up practicing yoga under mango trees in the tropics. He is a certified Kundalini Yoga teacher and has taught yoga to children and adults in Vermont, New Mexico, Connecticut, India, France, and Mauritius. He is a regular contributor to the Kundalini Research Institute newsletter and explores current yoga research.

 

 

 

Sat Bir Singh Khalsa, Ph.D. Sat Bir Singh Khalsa, Ph.D. is the KRI Director of Research, Research Director for the Kripalu Center for Yoga & Health, and Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. He has practiced a Kundalini Yoga lifestyle since 1973 and is a KRI certified Kundalini Yoga instructor. He has conducted research on yoga for insomnia, stress, anxiety disorders, and yoga in public schools. He is editor in chief of the International Journal of Yoga Therapy and The Principles and Practice of Yoga in Health Care and author of the Harvard Medical School ebook Your Brain on Yoga.

 

 

 

 


 

Back to Basics with Kundalini Yoga
Kundalini Yoga is a powerful practice for personal transformation. It works swiftly to energize your whole system and, through you, impact your total environment. This feature is dedicated to highlighting the essential skills and fundamental principles of Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan®. It will serve to focus and refine your daily practice and align your teaching with the master.
Chanting the Mangala Charan Mantra Miri Piri Academy The “mangala charan” is a term used for the opening portion of a prayer or sacred text. It is an introduction and so much more! It is a blessing that prepares the mind and opens the spirit to receive prayer. It is a beautiful and powerful form of Shabad Guru, the teacher in Naad form. There are many beautiful mangala charans in Sikh sacred texts to be explored. When we refer to the Mangala Charan mantra in Kundalini Yoga, we mean the mangala charan of the Sukhmani Sahib written by Guru Arjan Dev ji around the year 1602. It is the opening lines of the Bani – Aad Guray Nameh, Jugad Guray Nameh, Sat Guray Nameh, Siri Guru Devay Nameh. Although not required, at the beginning of a Kundalini Yoga class, you will often hear the Mangala Charan recited after chanting the Adi Mantra - Ong Namo Guru Dev Namo. It is also chanted in devotion by itself for protection. The mantra translates: I bow to the primal wisdom, I bow to the wisdom that is true through the ages, I bow to the true wisdom, I bow to the great unseen wisdom. Here is a quotation where Yogi Bhajan gives instructions on how to chant the mantra as well as a sweet conceptual visualization to accompany the four parts of the mantra. "Now listen, when you chant [the Mangala Charan], this is how it happens; Aad Guray Nameh; the Infinite stands on the left side of you, that is the heart side. Jugad Guray Nameh; the Lord of time stands behind you, so time supports you. Sat Guray Nameh; the Truth of the now stands on your right side, it means your actions stand approved. Siri Guru Devay Nameh; the great Infinite Guru stand before you. So, what could go wrong with you? Just imagine what a powerful mantra it is. If you properly maneuver your mind and channel the energy, you can see how this is happening around you, and you are sitting in the center. That is how you chant this mantra, in the light as it was first sung. “This mantra was the first mantra Guru Arjun [wrote when he] started writing Sukhmani Sahib, the “Lagoon of the Peace”, the Giver of the Infinite Peace. This was the first mantra he chanted. Whenever you chant it, you will be guarded from all four projections of your personality. Just think about it, think in that light. Your guiding star becomes the infinite transparent Guru, the Infinite stands on your left side, the time-Guru stands on the back of you, righteousness stands on the right side of you, and in front is that One who is one with all One. Is there anything more a man could want?” October 16, 1973 All the best with blessings, Nirvair Singh Khalsa CEO KRI

 

 

 

 

Kundalini Yoga Music in Refugee Camps in Greece An Open Thank You to Kundalini Yoga Musicians Worldwide Kundalini Yoga Music in Refugee Camps Today, I want to shout-out a big Thank You! to Snatam Kaur and all the Kundalini Yoga musicians worldwide. Your music has made all the difference for me and many of the people I teach. In November, I started teaching yoga at Skaramagas, one of the biggest refugee camps in Greece. I first got involved in the refugee situation back in 2015 when I went to Lesvos for a weekend. In 2016, I briefly taught at another refugee organization in Athens, but then I got busy writing my book, and since that time, I hadn’t been involved at all. Last fall, when I saw a post for volunteers to teach yoga at Skaramagas, I thought it was a good opportunity to see if I could be useful. Teaching yoga in these environments is always tough. The students are a mix of nationalities and cultures. Some speak Farsi, some speak Arabic, some speak other languages, and they can’t necessarily understand each other, much less me. I teach women, and they almost always have children so there are usually lots of toddlers running around. Most of the women have never done yoga so I am teaching a room full of beginners who can’t always understand what I am saying and who have to mind their children while they are taking the class. I’ve always felt safe, and the environment has always been clean, but the classes can be chaotic and unpredictable. I’ve had moments when I’ve questioned if I was offering any actual value. But the reason that I think the classes are helpful is not because of me, rather because of the Kundalini Yoga music I play during class. Kundalini Yoga music is very specific. It is based on Kundalini Yoga mantra and is designed to benefit your psychology, raise your energetic frequency, and soothe your mind. It works, and I see the results time and time again, especially in these environments. The class starts off chaotic but at some point–usually about 30 minutes into it–the energy settles, the kids start to calm down, and everyone becomes more relaxed and focused. The beauty of Kundalini Yoga music is you don’t need to participate much—you just need to have it playing in the background. I’ve had students later come to tell me they were having a really bad day and then suddenly the music from a class the day before popped into their heads, and they began to feel better. It’s soothing. I’ve noticed it myself and have started playing it in my bedroom while I sleep. I swear, it makes a huge difference. The path of a musician isn’t an easy one, and I imagine the path of a Kundalini Yoga musician must be even harder. It’s a tiny, niche audience in a difficult and competitive professional field. I wonder if as a musician, you sometimes think of quitting. But they say music is one of the few things that can unite and connect the whole world. Live Aid, a benefit concert organized to raise funds for relief of the Ethiopian famine, broadcasted globally with over 1 billion people watching back in 1985 – almost 40 percent of the world population at the time. So, while it’s a hard path, it’s also an extremely powerful gift. So, to Snatam Kaur, Hari Rai Kaur, Siri Sadhana, and all the other Kundalini musicians out there, if you read this, you probably didn’t know your music was being played in refugee camps in Greece. But it is. And it’s making a big difference. So, thank you.

 

Lynn Roulo Lynn Roulo is an American Kundalini Yoga and Enneagram instructor living in Athens, Greece. She teaches a unique combination of the two systems, combining the physical benefits of Kundalini Yoga with the psychological growth tools of the Enneagram. She has written two KRI approved books combining Kundalini Yoga and the Enneagram. She blogs about living in Greece and about her journey from being a San Francisco CFO to an Athens Yoga instructor. You can learn more about Lynn and her journey here.

 

 


 

Sat Nam from The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings® Library of Teachings Library of TeachingsWe hope you have had a wonderful start to 2019! It is hard to believe we have arrived in February already, a month when some celebrate love and romance with Valentine’s Day. Instead of only expressing love to those around you, we invite you to take it to a deeper level. Yogi Bhajan taught about love and often highlighted the importance of self-love as the first step to experiencing the love at all. He explains in this lecture from 1989: First learn to love yourself; an empty glass doesn't quench anyone’s thirst. First love yourself and show how much you love yourself. You can let people bask in your radiance and shine. Then love someone and you always will live in heavens while on earth. He continues: I hope and pray that you will wake up. Awakening the Kundalini is opening the third eye. It means seeing the unseen; it means being practical and calculating; imaginative and realistic; truthful and self-loving. ~Yogi Bhajan, August 9, 1989. Ram Das Puri, New Mexico This lecture from August 9, 1989 is accompanied by the original video lecture. Take some time to watch the entire lecture that he gave at teen summer camp at Ram Das Puri. May you continue to celebrate this New Year with self-love because what he said is true, “an empty glass doesn’t quench anyone’s thirst!” As always, we cannot thank you enough for your continued support and monthly gifts. We are so grateful for all that you do for The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings. Keep up, and you will be kept up!
Library of Teachings Donation
In Gratitude, Shabd Simran Shabd Simran Kaur Adeniji, Fundraising Coordinator The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings® Kundalini Research Institute Email: donations@kriteachings.org Find us on Facebook “The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachingswww.libraryofteachings.com

 

 

The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings® is a non-profit organization and all donations are tax deductible under IRS code 501(c)(3).

 

 

 

 


 



KRI Specials for February 2019 Enlightened BodiesEnlightened Bodies Exploring Physical and Subtle Human Anatomy Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan® Nirmal Lumpkin, LMT and Japa Kaur Khalsa, DOM Enlightened Bodies inspires and elevates the approach and study of the human body, interconnecting anatomy, physiology and ancient yogic teachings. Enlightened Bodies presents the complexities of the body in a refreshing and approachable style, integrating multiple perspectives including:
  • Human Anatomy
  • Ayurveda
  • Kundalini Yoga
  • Traditional Chinese Medicine
  • Self-Care
  • Other lifestyle traditions
This is an essential book for yoga enthusiasts and healthcare practitioners who are looking for a deeper understanding of the human body and ways to incorporate complementary health practices in their treatment plan. Regular Retail: $39.95 Promo: $33.96

 


 

Praana, Praanee, PraanayamPraana, Praanee, Praanayam Exploring the Breath Technology of Kundalini Yoga as Taught by Yogi Bhajan® Compiled from the Teachings of Yogi Bhajan and illustrated by Harijot Kaur Khalsa Praana, Praanee, Praanayam is a collection of Yogi Bhajan's quotes and kriyas gathered from lectures throughout his 35-year teaching career in the West. Yogi Bhajan was a Master of praanic energy, and these quotes and kriyas can help you to understand and experience who you truly are in the universe of praana. Regular Retail: $35.00 Promo: $29.75 These are also sold in 3 sets of 8 each for $120.00 per set, which is 25% off regular retail!

 


 

Kundalini Yoga with the Master DVD Series Kundalini Yoga with the Master DVD Series The Kundalini Yoga with the Master DVD Series is your chance to practice demanding physical kriyas with Yogi Bhajan. The all new picture-in-picture guide shows the proper posture and timing while you are challenged to "Keep Up!" by the Master himself. Volume 1: Energize Your System Featured in Owner’s Manual for the Human Body Among other benefits, this kriya contains exercises to: - energize the heart chakra and stomach - give power to the immune system - adjust the spine - cleanse the liver and purify the blood Volume 2: Balance the Vayus Featured in Owner’s Manual for the Human Body There are five principal Vayus: Praana moving in the heart area; Udaana in the throat; Samaana in the navel region; Apaana in the pelvic floor; and Vyaana which circulates throughout the whole body. This set moves all five Vayus of the body and brings equilibrium to the glandular system. Volume 3: For Mental Balance Featured in Owner’s Manual for the Human Body Concludes with Yogi Bhajan playing the gong while you nap. Yogi Bhajan said that by regularly practicing the first and second exercise in this kriya for three minutes each and then repeating frog pose 108 times you can achieve physical and mental health. Volume 4: Optimum Health Featured in Owner’s Manual for the Human Body Refine your radiance with Optimum Health. This physically demanding set is balanced with great moments of relaxation including an 11-minute nap to Guru Ram Das Lullybye and a gong meditation. Volume 5: Automatic Endurance featured in the manual Owner's Manual for the Human Body Let this DVD show you: - Conscious breath for total self-purification - The Power of baby pose - How to develop tolerance, grit and nerves of steel Volume 6: Wake Up the Body to Handle Stress and Strain Featured in the manual Owner's Manual for the Human Body This video contains ideal exercises to do in bed or just out of bed first thing in the morning! Volume 7: Yogic Salutations Featured in the manual Self Knowledge This kriya incorporates a variety of salutations including: - Narda Pranaam - Hans Pranaam - Guru Pranaam Volume 8: Massage for the Lymphatic System Featured in the manual Physical Wisdom Stimulating eliminative movement in the lymphatic system is essential to a strong body and healthy immune system. Give your lymphatic system a massage with this original kriya taught by Yogi Bhajan! All DVDs in this series: Regular Retail: $19.95 per DVD Promo: $16.96 per DVD Or get the entire set for the everyday low “set price” of $119.70 (25% off full retail)

KRI Newsletter February Recipe Excerpt from: From Vegetables with Love Recipes and Tales from a Yogi’s Kitchen Revised and Expanded New Edition Siri-Ved Kaur Khalsa Walnut Oat Bars Yield: 16 bars
Walnut Oat Bars
These are great snacks and treats. For fun variations, see filling suggestions that follow. 2 cups butter 1 cup honey 2 teaspoons vanilla extract 2 cups whole wheat pastry flour ½ teaspoon baking powder ½ teaspoon salt 2½ cups rolled oats 2 cups chopped walnuts Cream butter, honey, and vanilla in mixing bowl. Add flour, baking powder, and salt and beat until smooth. Add oats and walnuts. Spread evenly in a buttered 8-inch square pan and bake at 350° for 30 minutes, or until lightly browned and still a little moist. Cool and cut into squares. Instructions for Making Filled Bars Try one of the delectable fillings below. Simply prepare the dough for Walnut Oat Bars as directed. Then spread half of the dough in an 8-inch square baking pan. Cover with the filling, and top with the remaining dough. Bake as directed. Filling Variations: Lemon Date 8 ounces chopped dates 3 tablespoons water 1 tablespoon lemon juice Put chopped dates, water, and lemon juice in a small saucepan. Cook over medium heat, stirring frequently, until mushy. Very Berry 10 ounces frozen berries ½ cup unrefined sugar 2 tablespoons cornstarch mixed with ¼ cup cold water Place frozen berries (blueberries, boysenberries, raspberries, etc.) in a medium saucepan. Add sugar and bring to boiling point. Add cornstarch mixture and cook, stirring until thickened and translucent. Toasted Coconut 2 cups toasted, shredded coconut (see page 289) ¼ cup butter ½ cup honey or agave nectar Add ½ cup of coconut to bar dough, set remainder aside. Melt butter and honey in a saucepan and bring to boil. Add coconut, stir, and remove from heat.

 

 



Trainer’s Corner
Trainer’s Forum
What is a Trainer Forum? A Trainer Forum is a meeting place for open dialogue amongst members and applicants of the Aquarian Trainer Academy. It is an opportunity for professional development as a trainer. It is a time to come together as a community of trainers to refresh our spirit and revisit our values, build skills and share best practices, create new relationships and deepen existing ones. Key elements of every Trainer Forum include: Peer to Peer Meetings – network and connect with your peers around the world Global Decision Making – have your voice heard and participate in hot topic discussions Workshops – interactive presentations on specialty areas led by both KRI and local trainers Sharing Best Practices and Learned Lessons - Sharing with each other what works and what needs work We look forward to seeing you at an upcoming Forum! For more information visit: http://trainersupport.kundaliniresearchinstitute.org/trainer-forum/ 2019 Trainer Forums Theme: Culture, Communication, Community Chile 2019: Narayan Yoga, Providencia, Chile – NEW DAYS! Sunday, January 27, 9:00am – 6:00pm & Monday, January 28, 9:00am – 2:00pm Trainerforum@kriteachings.org for early registration discount Mexico 2019: Rama Yoga, Mexico City, Mexico Tuesday, February 12, 9:30am – 6:30pm & Wednesday, February 13 9:30am – 1:30pm trainerforum@kriteachings.org for early registration discount Summer Solstice 2019: Hacienda de Guru Ram Das, Espanola, New Mexico New Times! Wednesday, June 12, 8:30 – 5:30pm & Thursday, June 13, 8:30am – 12:30pm Registration Open January 15th Europe 2019: Chateau Anand, Saint Pierre de Maille, France Thursday, July 25, 8:30pm – 5:30pm & Friday, July 26, 8:30am – 12:30pm Registration Coming Soon! Australia 2019: Australia Kundalini Yoga Festival Monday , October 7th, 6:00pm – 9:00 pm & Tuesday, October 8th 9:00am – 6:00 pm China 2019: October 2019 Winter Solstice 2019: Hampton Inn, Lake Wales, Florida, Sunday, December 16, 8:30am – 5:30pm

 

KRI January Newsletter

News From KRI - January




Kundalini Research Institute The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings Endowment Fund
SUPPORT THE KUNDALINI RESEARCH INSTITUTE & THE LIBRARY OF TEACHINGS Library of Teachings Donation

 


 

A Note From Nirvair Happy New Year Sat Nam. Greetings and Happy New Year from New Mexico! In a 1987 New Year’s Eve lecture, Yogi Bhajan gives a great reminder. He said,
    “The greatest human folly is a very simple mistake of not feeling grateful - not counting the pluses. I was talking to somebody on the telephone to wish her a Happy New Year and she told me, ‘Oh my God this year was terrible.’ “I said, ‘How come? You have eyes you can see through, you have ears you can hear with, your tongue is speaking, what else do you want? Twenty percent of people do not have eyes. There are thousands and hundreds of thousands of people who do not have ears.’ “Sometimes, for very minor things, we become so obnoxious, so rude, so crude, that we say things that are not understandable. We want to close the year 1987 with the idea that we are here, we want to rejoice, we want to be happy. We understand the tragedies, we understand bad things happen to us. But we also understand that, in spite of all the bad things, we are here and being here is a triumph over tragedy. We want to start the new year with a simple idea that our anchor with the Guru and God shall come through. That is what actually Ang Sang Wahe Guru means…. “Happiness lies in compassion. When you are willing to give and you give without expecting any intake or reward, only then are you happy. Happy is not because of money. If money or jewelry or clothes can buy you happiness, or Italian food or French food or Swedish cheese can buy you happiness, then those people who have all that should be happy and everybody else should be unhappy. Two-thirds of rich people are unhappy and [only] one-third of poor people are unhappy. The standard of unhappiness is based on a one factual fact - People who do not count their pluses and do not live in gratitude are unhappy. People who just count their pluses and live in gratitude are always happy.”
I am looking forward to a great new year filled with pluses and gratitude with all of you! Yogi TeaSpeaking of greatness, KRI is honoring an individual and group in 2019. The KRI Board has selected Jagat Guru Singh Khalsa and the TOGO West African Teachers and Trainers for their many years of service, steadiness, and dedication to Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan®. I am very happy that we can honor them on our web site for all of 2019. Read more about the KRI 2019 Honors. Start the New Year with a great product for your health and well-being from KRI. Original Classic Yogi Tea in bulk is available at the Source. We buy the bulk organic Yogi Tea mix directly from our Yogi Tea plant in Imola, Italy. It is said that when you travel the world and you find someone from our community, you will hear the words “Sat Nam” and you will get a cup of Yogi Tea. Make sure you have a pot of Yogi Tea always on the stove!

 

Nirvair Singh Khalsa May we live in gratitude and service in 2019, Nirvair Singh Khalsa CEO KRI

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Let Them Go By Jugat Guru Singh Khalsa and Saraswati Kaur Khalsa, Miri Piri Academy. It has been ten months since we started this column in the KRI Newsletter, and we have circled back to the beginning. Yogi Bhajan stated very clearly ten things to give your children:

 

Yogi Bhajan Raising Children with Values and Virtues 10 Things to Give Your Children
  • Love them.
  • Build their self-esteem.
  • Challenge them.
  • Listen to them.
  • Expect respect.
  • Limit them.
  • Make God a part of their lives.
  • Develop a sense of learning in them.
  • Help them to be community-minded.
  • Let them go.

 

Miri Piri AcademyIt started with love, as all good things do. But this type of love is not love for a possession, rather it is love for the sovereign inner being within the being. That love begins with the recognition that our children do not belong to us. They are like birds resting on our branches for a short while. If we truly love them, we lot go even from the beginning. We let go of our projections, attachments, expectations, needs, and desires. We nurture their bodies and minds with conscious care. We give them the time, space, and opportunities to develop self-confidence, wisdom, and self-awareness. We serve as their teachers, and we allow them to experience their own grace. Now, there is nothing left but prayer. “There is no power nor worship in this Universe greater than prayer; there is no love other than prayer.” - Yogi Bhajan 7/14/82 The truth is that there really is no choice! They are going to follow their own path, whether we release them willingly or not. The test of our love is whether we feel joy in watching them fly or create tragedy in our own attachment. On June 30, 1991, Yogi Bhajan made this heart-felt request to parents: "I am just asking you, ‘please, give your children a chance. Don't let them walk on the same rough road on which you have walked. Give them the chance of encouragement and endurance. Let them stand on their own feet. Let them walk tall. Let them go through it now so they can have a bright tomorrow. Let them face it today. Give them a chance to handle today, whatever it is.’ You are alive and well today, and you can protect their today if there is a serious problem. But they have to protect their own tomorrow, with their own will and their own grit. Give them the chance to build that grit.” At Miri Piri Academy, we have been working for more than 20 years to understand and apply Yogi Bhajan’s model of education. We carefully design and systematically apply the guidance that he gave: teach our students values and virtues, show them their vastness, and give them a love for seva. It has been a journey with many challenges, and we continue to learn and strive towards excellence every day. Becoming a teacher or a parent is very much a journey, rather than a destination. Miri Piri Academy is pleased to announce that in January we will be launching a newsletter devoted to exploring the application of Yogi Bhajan’s teachings to the challenges of modern-day parenting. If you would like to subscribe to this new project, please visit our website. Thank you, and best wishes for you and your children in 2019.

 

 

Saraswati Khalsa Saraswati Kaur Khalsa is the Assistant Principal of Miri Piri Academy and has been serving there since 2007. She has been a student of Yogi Bhajan since birth and completed her Level One Kundalini Yoga Teacher training under his guidance. Saraswati holds a Master’s Degree in Social Work and has been working with children and schools since 1998. Her daughter also attends Miri Piri Academy as a student.

 

Jugat Guru Singh Jugat Guru Singh Khalsa is the Principal of Miri Piri Academy in Amritsar, India and a KRI Certified Lead Teacher Trainer. From his childhood, he was guided by Yogi Bhajan and has dedicated his life to serving the mission of Yogi Bhajan by helping to shape the next generation into leaders and teachers of this amazing technology. Jugat Guru Singh is a member of the Chardi Kala Jetha, which travels around the world teaching and performing Gurbani Kirtan, including local performances at the Golden Temple.

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 


 

We are KRI - The Seal of Approval for Specialty Courses KRI Specialty Course As the teachings of Yogi Bhajan grow and spread across the world, fantastic training courses that focus on specific needs are being developed by sensitive and talented teachers and trainers. KRI supports these efforts and encourages the diverse application of Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan®. Here at KRI, it is our job to ensure that the teachings are conveyed with accuracy and portrayed with integrity. We have a system in place for the approval of yoga manuals, books, CDs, DVDs, research articles, website content, on-line products, or translations of existing KRI publications. After a thorough content and technology review, KRI awards the KRI Seal of Approval to all products that faithfully portray the teachings of Yogi Bhajan. When you see the KRI Seal of Approval, you know that you can trust the content. Now, KRI has expanded these efforts to allow Specialty Courses to earn the KRI Seal of Approval. The KRI Seal of Approval honors those Kundalini Yoga Specialty Courses that successfully meet the strict standards of KRI review, a sign to students that the teachings of Yogi Bhajan that are included in the course materials have been thoroughly reviewed for accuracy and integrity. Are you developing a course that includes the teachings of Yogi Bhajan? We encourage you to validate your material and earn the prestigious KRI Seal of Approval. The best time to contact KRI is early in your course development process. Working hand in hand with KRI minimizes the need for costly after-the-fact changes. We understand that you may already have developed and been teaching your course. Either way, we are here to work closely with you to help you obtain the KRI Seal of Approval. Contact Sadhu at sadhu@kriteachings.org for more information and for an initial consultation. Learn more: about KRI Specialty Courses that have already been approved and are being successfully delivered. It may inspire you to launch your own course!
Meditative Healing Meditative Healing Nine Min Max Nine Min Max Total Man Training Total Man Training Waldzell Leadership Waldzell Leadership
KRI Specialty Course approval does not mean that a graduate of the specialty course can teach Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan®. Specialty Courses are not a substitution for KRI Teacher Training programs.

 


 

 

Yoga for Enhancing Sports Performance: Making a Better Athlete by Nikhil Ramburn and Sat Bir Singh Khalsa, Ph.D Reprinted from the April 2018 KRI Newsletter Making a Better Athlete Athletes get plenty of strength training and often do their stretching, so why would they need yoga? The postural, exercise and breath-regulation aspects of yoga provide a unique opportunity for core strength training by engaging the entire midsection in order to support one’s body weight. Other physical benefits include improved coordination, proprioception, flexibility, relaxation, deeper respiration, and decreased recovery time from heavy workouts. In addition, the meditative, mindfulness aspects of yoga provide substantive psychological benefits that include improved stress and emotion regulation, improved mindful awareness, enhanced cognition and concentration, and the ability to achieve a flow state. “Flow” refers to an optimal psychological state involving a complete absorption in the task or activity at hand - a state generally coveted by athletes because it is associated with strong positive emotions, including a deep experience of peace, harmony, and unity. Since self-regulation and performance enhancement are critical to athletic performance, it is not surprising that an increasing number of professional sports teams are implementing yoga as standard training practice. Specific studies have been supportive of the benefits of yoga for athletes since the 1990s. An early study correlated the benefits of Transcendental Meditation with the improved pistol shooting performance of 30 undergraduate students. Similar improvements were observed in 25 elite shooters by a team of researchers at the Ullevål University Hospital in Oslo, Norway. The researchers observed a greater improvement in competition results among the group that received meditation training when compared to a control group. Another early study from the University of Nevada, observed significant improvements in the running performance of high school long-distance runners after yoga exercises when compared to a control group of a “motivational shouting” exercise intervention. Some studies have focused on specific physiological benefits that underlie the global improvements with yoga, such as a 2004 study, which was published in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. The researchers observed the effects of a single yoga set on muscle soreness. 24 yoga-trained individuals were compared to a control group of 12 non-yoga-trained volunteers. All participants were female, and the researchers observed that both yoga training and the single yoga session appeared to attenuate peak muscle soreness after a session of eccentric exercise. These findings have significant implications for facilitating faster recovery from muscle soreness in athletes. A 2016 study published in the International Journal of Yoga examined the impact of 10 weeks of yoga on the flexibility and balance of college athletes. 14 soccer players took part in bi-weekly yoga sessions, whereas the control group, which was comprised of baseball players, did not receive any additional yoga activity. The researchers observed significant gains in flexibility and balance in the yoga group whereas no significant changes were observed in the control group. Another landmark study evaluated the influence of yoga on the postural skills of the Italian short-track speed skating team. Eight men and seven women were given a total of 36 yoga sessions over eight weeks of high volume pre-season training. The researchers observed improvements in 11 of the 14 postural angles analyzed. In addition, no skaters suffered injury from the training volume, and coaches even reported improvements in the efficiency of skating technique. Apart from the improvements in physical performance, yoga also confers the additional cognitive benefits of the meditative, mindfulness aspect of yoga. Applied sport psychology, in its efforts to enhance the competitive performance of athletes, has traditionally emphasized self-control and the elimination of negative thoughts and emotions. Recent evidence suggests, however, that this suppression may actually have the opposite effect of aggravating these thoughts and emotions. Rather, it is suggested that interventions that emphasize acceptance rather than direct change or suppression of cognitive and affective experiences may lead to enhanced athletic performance. A 2017 meta-analysis conducted by the Swiss Federal Institute of Sport and the University of Basel in Switzerland reviewed nine trials with 290 athletes of various disciplines including track athletes, cyclists, dart throwers, rugby players, and hockey players, to name a few. The athletes received a mindfulness intervention that varied from 4 weeks to over 2 years and researchers found that mindfulness scores consistently improved across the various sport disciplines. In addition, researchers concluded that mindfulness practice can be considered a performance-enhancing training approach in precision sports such as shooting and dart throwing. A recent study published in the Journal of Sport Rehabilitation in 2017 also found sufficient evidence to support the use of mindfulness with student-athletes to aid in managing negative emotions and perceived stress. There is also preliminary evidence that mindfulness-based interventions may reduce injury in the same student-athlete populations. One of the theoretical models that may explain these observed benefits is the effect of mindfulness on rumination and sport-specific coping skills. Researchers from the Center of Research on Welfare, Health, and Sports in Sweden, observed that athletes who are more mindful in daily life tend to regulate their negative emotions and not engage in excessive rumination, which may in turn, improve their coping skills in a variety of sport-related challenges. A preliminary investigation into the effect of mindfulness and flow in elite youth swimmers included a 10-week yoga intervention. Although no statistically significant changes in mindfulness and flow were identified, participants did report perceived improvements in those aspects. Moreover, qualitative data suggested that the yoga intervention resulted in positive improvements on a range of cognitive and physiological aspects. It is possible that study weaknesses of small sample size and yoga practice compliance may have contributed to the nonsignificant quantitative findings. Other studies on higher level psychological benefits have been conducted, such as a pilot project conducted at George Mason University in Virginia. It found that five weeks of hatha yoga sessions resulted in an increase of self-reported mindfulness and greater goal-directed energy when compared to a nonrandomized control group. In summary, studies to date have demonstrated the beneficial effects of yoga on specific components of athletic performance including both physical and cognitive characteristics. Future research should address the previous limitations of small sample sizes, lack of longer-term studies, and in some cases the absence of randomization. Dose response characteristics and the relative contribution to efficacy of the different components of yoga such as physical postures, breathing techniques, and meditation are worthy of additional study. These future trials would further improve our knowledge of the underlying mechanisms of how yoga practice enhances the specific components of athletic performance, which of course has relevance for human performance in the general population.

 

Nikhil Rayburn Nikhil Rayburn grew up practicing yoga under mango trees in the tropics. He is a certified Kundalini Yoga teacher and has taught yoga to children and adults in Vermont, New Mexico, Connecticut, India, France, and Mauritius. He is a regular contributor to the Kundalini Research Institute newsletter and explores current yoga research.

 

 

 

Sat Bir Singh Khalsa, Ph.D. Sat Bir Singh Khalsa, Ph.D. is the KRI Director of Research, Research Director for the Kripalu Center for Yoga & Health, and Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. He has practiced a Kundalini Yoga lifestyle since 1973 and is a KRI certified Kundalini Yoga instructor. He has conducted research on yoga for insomnia, stress, anxiety disorders, and yoga in public schools. He is editor in chief of the International Journal of Yoga Therapy and The Principles and Practice of Yoga in Health Care and author of the Harvard Medical School ebook Your Brain on Yoga.

 

 

 

 


 

Sat Nam from The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings® Library of Teachings Library of TeachingsSo many generous donations came through last month in our Year End Fund Drive! We cannot thank you enough! Thank you!! Your gifts fuel the growth of this incredible resource of Yogi Bhajan’s teachings. Your support is such a blessing. We hope you are having a wonderful start to your new year. For many of us, this time of year brings a renewed sense of commitment to our daily practice and commitment to health, wellness, or anything we want to shift in our lives. In this lecture, Yogi Bhajan wishes his students a prosperous year and reminds them about the importance of daily Sadhana and trusting their Dharma. He says; “Do not worry. The key word for this year, which can give you all the life you need, is your sadhana. Sadhana is such a beautiful companion. She will pull you from nothing to everything. But it requires a discipline on your part, and it requires a continuity. We have become Dharma within ourselves - complete and desirable. Some of us, under some circumstances, doubt that very much. Doubt is natural. But when you don't doubt, you have dharma. When you doubt, you don't have dharma. Doubt is an individual faculty to see that we require this doubt. No, my friends, that is not the right mental stage. The correct mental stage is when you let your mind watch what God wills, without doubt. How beautiful you will look. How saintly you will look. How radiant you will look. Many people will love you and experience you with calmness, tranquility, and quietness. And from your strength, they will grow - that is also the Shabad. You emit light that touches the boundary of other people’s arc line and aura. They enrich themselves, and this grace is called the best of the human race. I wish you a prosperous, prosperous, prosperous New Year … Bless all, bless the Khalsa in this coming year with prosperity and with success, with happiness and with unity. Bless the world with peace. May all have their dreams come true.” Yogi Bhajan, December 31st, 1998. Read or listen to the original lecture here on The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings®. What a beautiful reminder at the start of the New Year focusing on Sadhana and Dharma, two elements that affect every aspect of our lives. May this year be one of prosperity and joy for all. May your Sadhana strengthen and your Dharma be ever-present in your mind. Thank you for continuing to support the preservation of these teachings!
Library of Teachings Donation
In Gratitude, Shabd Simran Shabd Simran Kaur Adeniji, Fundraising Coordinator The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings® Kundalini Research Institute Email: donations@kriteachings.org Find us on Facebook “The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachingswww.libraryofteachings.com

 

 

The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings® is a non-profit organization and all donations are tax deductible under IRS code 501(c)(3).

 

 

 

 


 

KRI Specials for January 2019 RebirthingRebirthing Breath, Vitality & Strength Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan® The idea of rebirthing is to release the subconscious, the storehouse of misery. - Yogi Bhajan Heal the pain and overcome the obstacles which keep you from living your best life: awakened, rejuvenated and present to your purpose. Rebirthing Courses by Yogi Bhajan have long been some of the most talked about classes he offered in his 35 years of teaching in the United States and abroad. For the first time, these kriyas are now available in a single manual along with the lectures that accompanied them. All 32 courses are represented in this manual, and 24 are available in the accompanying DVD Series. Courses include: • Clearing the Magnetic Block from the Womb • Removing the Fears from the Fifth Month in the Womb • Unloading the Pain of Perpetual Memories • Ghost Kriya: Clearing the Ghosts and Opening Intuition • Forgiveness and Unloading the Subconscious Garbage Regular Retail: $39.95 Promo: $33.96

 


 

RebirthingRebirthing, DVD Lecture Series Includes 24 classes from the Rebirthing courses, which Yogi Bhajan taught from the fall of 1988 through the spring of 1989. The idea of rebirthing is to release the subconscious, the storehouse of misery. - Yogi Bhajan 1. Rebirthing l 2. Rebirthing ll 3. Rebirthing lll 4. Rebirthing lV 5. Unloading Your Pain & Fear l 6. Unloading Your Pain & Fear ll 7. Unloading the Pain of Perpetual Memories l 8. Unloading the Pain of Perpetual Memories ll 9. Release Your Garbage 10. Ardh Kechari Kriya 11. Getting Rid of Transit Memories l 12. Getting Rid of Transit Memories ll 13. Removing the Fears from the Fifth Month in the Womb l 14. Removing the Fears from the Fifth Month in the Womb ll 15. Clearing the Magnetic Block from the Womb l 16. Clearing the Magnetic Block from the Womb ll 17. Cleaning the Clutter of the Mind l 18. Cleaning the Clutter of the Mind ll 19. Cleaning the Mind l 20. Cleaning the Mind ll 21. Cleaning the Mind for Deep Meditation 22. Letting Go of the Pain of the Seventh Year 23. Clearing the Subconscious Stories 24. Dropping Your Personal Pain plus Bonus DVD: Prosperity Lecture & Meditation Regular Price: $19.95 per DVD Promo: $16.96 These are also sold in 3 sets of 8 each for $120.00 per set, which is 25% off regular retail!

 


 

MantraNew Book! Mantra, Personal Guidance through the Power of the Word by Bibiji Inderjit Kaur Khalsa, PhD, Bhai Sahiba of Sikh Dharma International Clarity-Healing-Intuition-Peace Self Esteem-Stability-Trust-Wisdom This book contains hundreds of beautiful mantras to recite and repeat for these and other personal needs you face in your life. The Mantras in this book have been lovingly collected, translated and commented upon by the devoted wife of Yogi Bhajan, the spiritual teacher who brought Kundalini Yoga to the United States in 1969 and built the extensive 3HO (Happy, Healthy, Holy Organization) worldwide community. Mantra is an important component of Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan®. Kundalini Yoga teachers follow a variety of spiritual paths, and the mantras in Kundalini Yoga are of a universal nature. They transcend religious belief and embody universal truths that every human being can experience. Retail: $39.95 Promo: $33.96
KRI January 2019 Recipe of the Month Black Channa with Mustard Oil Excerpt From: From Vegetables, With Love: Recipes and Tales from a Yogi’s Kitchen (Revised and Expanded New Edition) Siri-Ved Kaur Khalsa Yield: 6 servings
Black Channa
An excellent source of fiber and nutrients, this dish is also served traditionally to honor a special anniversary, the passing of a loved one, an offering of gratitude, or as a prayer for protection. It is especially tasty when served with Lemon Rice (page 186). Perfect vegetable companions are cruciferous greens (e.g., kale, mustard, rapini) and/or beets. 2 cups whole kala channa (black garbanzo beans) ⅓ cup ghee or oil 2 onions, chopped 8 cloves garlic, chopped ⅓ cup chopped fresh ginger 1–2 jalapeño chiles, chopped 1½ teaspoons cumin seeds 1 teaspoon black pepper 2–3 tablespoons pure mustard oil 2 teaspoons black salt (to taste) ¼ cup chopped cilantro (optional garnish) Select how you would like to cook the beans: in a regular soup pot or a pressure cooker. Soak beans overnight or 8 hours in 2 quarts of water. Regular Pot Method: Drain and put beans in a 6-quart soup pot. Add enough water to cover beans by at least 1 inch. Bring to boil, cover, and cook at slow boil for about 2 hours, until beans are very soft. Add water if too much boils away. Pressure Cooker Method: Drain and put beans in pressure cooker. Add water to cover beans by 1 inch. Cook at high pressure for 15 minutes. Release pressure with quick release method. If beans are not soft, pressure cook a few minutes longer. Meanwhile, prep and chop remaining ingredients. For the Masala: Heat ghee or oil in a heavy skillet over a medium to high flame. Add onions, garlic, ginger, and jalapeños and cook about 10 minutes, stirring frequently, until soft and getting browned. Add pepper and cumin seeds, stir, and continue cooking for another 5-10 minutes, adding a little water, as needed, to prevent sticking. Drain off excess water from cooked beans, leaving about 1-2 cups liquid in the pot. Add onion-ginger mixture to the beans. Cook, stirring occasionally, for 5 more minutes. You may mash some of the beans if you like. Add black salt to taste and remove from heat. When time to serve, drizzle beans with mustard oil and garnish with cilantro.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Trainer’s Corner
Trainer’s Forum
What is a Trainer Forum? A Trainer Forum is a meeting place for open dialogue amongst members and applicants of the Aquarian Trainer Academy. It is an opportunity for professional development as a trainer. It is a time to come together as a community of trainers to refresh our spirit and revisit our values, build skills and share best practices, create new relationships and deepen existing ones. Key elements of every Trainer Forum include: Peer to Peer Meetings – network and connect with your peers around the world Global Decision Making – have your voice heard and participate in hot topic discussions Workshops – interactive presentations on specialty areas led by both KRI and local trainers Sharing Best Practices and Learned Lessons- Sharing with each other what works and what needs work We look forward to seeing you at an upcoming Forum! For more information visit: http://trainersupport.kundaliniresearchinstitute.org/trainer-forum/ 2019 Trainer Forums Theme: Culture, Communication, Community Chile 2019: Narayan Yoga, Providencia, Chile – NEW DAYS! Sunday, January 27, 9:00am – 6:00pm & Monday, January 28, 9:00am – 2:00pm Trainerforum@kriteachings.org for early registration discount Mexico 2019: Rama Yoga, Mexico City, Mexico Tuesday, February 12, 9:30am – 6:30pm & Wednesday, February 13 9:30am – 1:30pm trainerforum@kriteachings.org for early registration discount Summer Solstice 2019: Hacienda de Guru Ram Das, Espanola, New Mexico New Times! Wednesday, June 12, 8:30 – 5:30pm & Thursday, June 13, 8:30am – 12:30pm Registration Open January 15th Europe 2019: Chateau Anand, Saint Pierre de Maille, France Thursday, July 25, 8:30pm – 5:30pm & Friday, July 26, 8:30am – 12:30pm Registration Coming Soon! Australia 2019: Australia Kundalini Yoga Festival Monday , October 7th, 6:00pm – 9:00 pm & Tuesday, October 8th 9:00am – 6:00 pm China 2019: October 2019 Winter Solstice 2019: Hampton Inn, Lake Wales, Florida, Sunday, December 16, 8:30am – 5:30pm

 

 

 

 

 


KRI December Newsletter






News From KRI - December



Kundalini Research Institute
The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings Endowment Fund





A Note From Nirvair

Happy Solstice

Sat Nam and Greetings from New Mexico.

It has been a remarkable, challenging, and uplifting year. On November 11, 1991, Yogi Bhajan gave valuable insight into this time we are living. He said,

“Aquarian age has set in. Piscean Age is – 'I want to know'. Aquarian Age is – 'I know it all, I will serve'. Piscean age is – 'Learn and pay your karma'. Aquarian is – 'I am the karma, no payment'. Now, you are not going to fit in, in that, that is the tragedy. You can swim in a lake, but now you are in an ocean. Action and reaction now will be simultaneous. If somebody now tells you, ‘Wake up!’, it will be a waste of time. The only thing one can say is, ‘Are you awakened?’ If the answer is ‘yes’, fine. If the answer is ‘no’, wrong. That’s it.

“The first fundamental mistake in your own existence is when you think you have to run the show. Now, how many of you had an opportunity to live as a guest in friend’s house? Please raise your hands. Almost everybody must have had a chance, correct? How many of you were foolish enough to go into a friend’s house and start running the household?....... Why you are selling yourself? Don’t sell, just be and just go through it. Go through the environments, that’s practical. Be practical, come to the root level, understand your own value at your own root level. Then, you will understand your spirit.”

Be a teacher, serve your world! It is a wonderful thing to uplift yourself and stay balanced in challenging times. It is another, grander, thing altogether to dedicate yourself to teach others.

Join me in our Level One Teacher Training in Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan® Immersion program in Bali this spring. It is time to be you and to work together to embody the values of this new age on Earth. It is time to come together, to learn together, and to work together to enjoy life in group consciousness so you can serve your highest self and serve all you meet. Yogi Bhajan, talking to Master’s Touch Immersion students in 1999 said,

“All right, you want to be teachers, right?

“Students: Yes sir.

“First you have to lose, if you are woman, all your faculty of woman. Secondly, you have to lose all faculty of man, if you are a man. Thirdly, you have to lose all faculty of a person and lastly you have to lose yourself, to become teacher. That's why we take that oath 'I am not a woman, I am not a man, I am not a person, I am not myself, I am a teacher.' You know what that means? That means, whatever the circumstances are, you are above it. No matter how much personal, you are impersonal and anything you say, do, or indulge in should be basic on one fact: I am the representative of that Infinity and I am here to elevate the excellence of another person. You can't, you can't say this person is rotten or this person is wonderful. No. Rotten and wonderful are just two sides of the polarity, and you will avoid judgement at all cost. This is how it works. If you have a habit of judgement, you will be never rich. If you let judgement go, you will never be poor. And a teacher has to be rich, because he has to help those who need help. He has to give money those who do not have it; he has to come through for those who have weakness. There are one hundred thousand things he must do from morning until night. He is the hope, he is the help, and he is the happiness. If [teacher] is a ‘she’, she has the same qualities, hope, help, and happiness.”

And thanks so much for your year-end donations to the Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings®! Your love and dedication keep the Library growing.

May you have a blessed Winter Solstice celebration, and may your holidays be filled with happiness, grace, and fun with family and friends!



Nirvair Singh Khalsa All love in Divine,


Nirvair Singh Khalsa
KRI CEO





Level One Immersion Training in Bali
April 21 – May 18, 2019

Bali Immersion

The decision to become a Kundalini Yoga instructor is a big one. Everyone’s reasons to commit to this training are different, but it is always a point of transformation in their lives. For many, that powerful transformation is what students are seeking. After going through Level One Immersion Training, one’s perspective on life changes and nothing is the same again.
Bali Immersion
Join KRI in the spring of 2019 on the blessed tropical island of Bali for 28 days of Level One training among the indigenous beauty of the culture and the people, steeped in spiritual and ceremonial tradition. Our training home is the Ananda Cottages in the village of Ubud.

In the 11th century, the great Hindu priest Markandya Rsi, was on pilgrimage from Ubud to the great Mother Temple of Bersakih, on Mount Agung. On the way, he noted some sacred places, one of which was the hill where Ananda Cottages now stand, a happy and holy place. Ananda means “bliss’ in the ancient Sanskrit language. It is a perfect location for KRI Level One training.

The Teacher Training team for the Bali Immersion is Sat Siri Kaur, Nirvair Singh, Sat Purkh Kaur, and Amrit Singh. These senior Teacher Trainers will guide you in how to build your grace and character. They will lead you through this program with inspirational and challenging lectures, kriyas, and meditations that will confront your self-imposed limits. You will discover how to live and teach from your highest and purest consciousness.

We would be delighted to have you join us in Bali for this amazing 28-day journey of self-discovery and transformation.

“You want to be Teachers. Then, you have to rise above all people. You have to rise above yourself also, and then everything becomes minor. What becomes major is the answer to the call of duty.”

– Yogi Bhajan, April 21, 1997



Click here for more information about Level One Teacher Training in Bali.


Bali Immersion




Kundalini Yoga and Quantum Physics By Amy Carpenter, LCSW, CYI

“The cosmos is within us. We are made of star-stuff. We are a way for the universe to know itself.” -Carl Sagan


Kundalini Yoga and Quantum Physics
My Friday morning Kundalini Yoga class, the one I’ve been teaching for years, just came to the end of its recent session. The pause in rhythm has me thinking about this practice, its fundamental nature, and what it does for people. What other yogic science combines rapid breath with rapid movement? And in what other yoga practice do we find ourselves maintaining the most challenging, and often absurd, physical postures while breathing rapidly, or chanting, or both? If someone completely unfamiliar with the practice were to walk into a random class mid-stream, they would likely stand speechless for a second, wearing a look of confusion as unspoken thoughts scream the question, “Now why would anyone want to do that!?”

Everyone in the yoga tribe would say the answer is simple: because it works. While most of earth’s humans would acknowledge that yoga has benefits, there is an ever-growing planetary tribe that has come to depend on the practice for stress relief, strength, flexibility, and… sanity. If life were like a river, as the mystics often say, then yoga is the flotation device that allows us to flow with the current a bit more calmly.

What then do we say about kundalini yoga? Perhaps we say that it is a bit like passing over a stretch of rapids, the kind that make you feel really good when you’ve gotten through. After a series of active postures, that final pause for stillness can feel like a momentary landing in some tranquil, sun-bedazzled pool. Kundalini Yoga is designed to turn things up. Conceptualized as fire, the practice stimulates the life force energy located within every human body, allowing it to rise in frequency, providing more attunement and resolve as we embrace the challenges of life. The term “raising kundalini” describes the process of igniting the inner fire and purity of energy, not unlike the fundamental laws of nature explained in quantum physics.

We float in a universe made up of waves and particles, according to quantum physics. These particles and waves move through a universe that is ever-expanding in a pulsating rhythm likened to breath. Matthew Fox, the great radical catholic priest, philosopher, and social activist, said that “we too, are both waves and particles- not just individuals but also the expression of the Cosmic Christ (or Buddha Nature) in all things.”

The atomic body also contains photons of light. When the particle containing these photons increases in temperature, it emits more energy. Planck's Law explains that not only do they increase in energy but overall, a larger proportion of the energy tends towards the violet end of the spectrum. Now, to the modern physicist, the “violet end of the spectrum” means an entirely different thing than it does to the modern yogi. When we think violet, we think chakra, and we think auric field. Still, the parallel is remarkable. Would it not stand to reason that when we practice a yoga that combines “breath of fire” with the rapid movements of temperature-raising postures, we’re not only increasing our energy force, but also aligning ourselves more fully with the violet light of high chakra consciousness- cultivating the divine within?!

Yoga tribe members know the descent into self that occurs at that nascent point during a mighty flow class or after a series of intense kundalini poses. It may come in during that 8th downward dog or seated cross-legged, pausing to integrate after holding bow pose with breath of fire. Whatever the path to arrival, we discover what it’s like to find ourselves and lose ourselves all in an instant. Our auric fields pulsate at a higher frequency, and those who can view colors often report seeing a rose-violet light.

The river never stops running, and the universe will always take its next breath. If we are part of the dance of life, why not experience that arrival, that alivedness- why not experience what it’s like to be that small particle, hitchhiking on the wave of the Divine?

Amy Carpenter Amy Carpenter, LCSW, CYI is a psychotherapist, Kundalini Yoga instructor and writer living in Rockport, Maine. She graduated from the Kundalini Research Institute in Espanola, New Mexico in June of 2007. Outside of a recent writing sabbatical, she has taught local KY classes ever since. Amy has two completed books; Glen Stone, a middle-grade novel, and Channel Crossing: The Challenge and Success of Solo Parenting, a self-help book. She has contributed articles to PsychCentral.com and her own blog, Singlehandedly.me, where she is managing partner. Amy’s writing passion is broad, and includes subjects such as: human connection, mindfulness, and accessing personal joy. She can be found at Amycarpenter.net.




Sat Nam from The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings®

Library of Teachings

Library of TeachingsJoin us this month as we explore “Move your Body – Lift your Spirits” with The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings®. In the darkening December days as we approach the Winter Solstice in the Northern Hemisphere, we will be exploring the ways that Kundalini Yoga can be benefit your fitness regimen and, at the same time, launch our Year End Fund Drive for the Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings.

As told to us by Dr. Sat Bir Singh Khalsa, Director of Research at KRI:

"Athletes get plenty of strength training and often do their stretching, so why would they need yoga? The postural, exercise, and breath-regulation aspects of yoga provide a unique opportunity for core strength training by engaging the entire midsection in order to support one’s body weight. Other physical benefits include improved coordination, flexibility, relaxation, deeper respiration, and decreased recovery time from heavy workouts.

"The meditative aspects of Kundalini Yoga provide substantive psychological benefits for athletes that include improved stress and emotion regulation, enhanced cognition and concentration, and the ability to achieve a flow state. 'Flow' refers to an optimal psychological state involving a complete absorption in the task or activity at hand; a state generally coveted by athletes because it is associated with strong positive emotions, including a deep experience of peace, harmony, and unity."

Watch your email inbox for the fund drive in December to learn more about the way that Kundalini Yoga can benefit your workout.

As you dive in to the holiday season and turn your attention to coming together with family and friends, buying gifts, and traveling, let these words remind you of the simple gifts you can give yourselves and each other:

Gift yourself peace and tranquility,
Gift yourself grace and honor,
Gift yourself a few moments of prayer,
to purify yourself


Yogi Bhajan December 26, 1997



As always, thank you so much for your continued support. People like you are keeping this resource evolving and growing into an online resource of precious teachings. Please let me know if there is anything I can do to improve your experience with the database!

Library of Teachings Donation


In Gratitude,

Shabd Simran Shabd Simran Kaur Adeniji, Fundraising Coordinator
The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings®
Kundalini Research Institute
Email: donations@kriteachings.org
Find us on Facebook “The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings
www.libraryofteachings.com

The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings® is a non-profit organization and all donations are tax deductible under IRS code 501(c)(3).




Community-Minded Children
By Jugat Guru Singh Khalsa and Saraswati Kaur Khalsa, Miri Piri Academy.

Miri Piri Academy "Recognize that the other person is you,” this is one of Yogi Bhajan’s most widely known teachings. To be community-minded is to understand the inextricable connection between ourselves and the people around us.

Individual consciousness has to go into a group consciousness to find the universal consciousness. It's simple law of consciousness. (Yogi Bhajan, UCLA Advanced Class - American Way of Life, October 12, 1972, Los Angeles, CA)

When I first started my work at Miri Piri Academy, I was tasked with supporting the graduating students in making plans for their future life. Being in their teenage years, most were anxious to go out, become independent, and explore their identity within the wider world. I always asked them to remember the concept of "Sangat." In the Siri Guru Granth Sahib, we are constantly reminded to be in the company of the "Sadh Sangat", the congregation of disciplined ones. Why?

"Why do we meet here constantly? Just to practice group consciousness, share the knowledge, go through it, practice it, feel it, and experience it. Why is it better than individual consciousness? We help each other, and we support each other. Our very existence together is helpful. Aristotle, the father of political science, said one thing, ‘Man is by nature a social animal.’ His higher nature will only come up when the social impact of his personality is fulfilled.” (Yogi Bhajan, Los Angeles Lecture, May 2, 1972, Los Angeles, CA)

As the strings on an instrument will vibrate sympathetically to the notes being played around them, so we human beings vibrate with the same consciousness as the people around us. No matter how much we believe something, how much we want something, or how strongly we feel about something, we are social beings and we are deeply affected by the community around us. As parents and teachers, it is important that we understand this and make sure that our children recognize the power of group consciousness as they make important decisions in their lives. If we value discipline, awareness, and spiritual consciousness, then our choice of congregation must take that into account. Choosing a community of love is an act of wisdom.

Miri Piri Academy Group consciousness is not just being aware of how the people around us are influencing us, but also about how we are influencing them. What can we do to serve? What can we do to elevate? What can we say to inspire, bring a smile, and motivate each other? Being community-minded is both an awareness of the impact others have on us as well as the impact we have on them.

So, the question is, how do we ingrain this community consciousness into our children? How do we teach them to recognize how the people around them are influencing them, and in turn, how their own words, thoughts, choices, and actions can have an impact on everyone else in their community? Many young children show compassion and empathy very early, but we often model the very opposite as parents. Though they struggle to balance their own needs and desires with this natural instinct towards kindness, they learn from us where and when to prioritize individual needs above those of the group. With this in mind, give yourself a deep introspection. Where do you balance the needs of self with the needs of others? How do you prioritize your time, energy, money, and attention between family, your community, and others you don’t know? Do you participate in the community and involve yourself where you are needed? Your example is the first and most important teacher of community consciousness to your children.

A powerful way to guide them in discovering their identity in relationship to community is to put them into an environment where their success or failure depends on a group. Let them experience situations where selfish needs and desires have to be constantly balanced against the needs of others. Be available to counsel them how to navigate this rough terrain, but let them try to work things out themselves. Whether its teamwork, dorm living, or the power of music and chanting together, give them a visceral experience of the power of a group working together. Above all, give them the experience of teaching and leading others, so that they understand through experience how their attitude and example influence everyone around them.

Last year one of our 11th grade students at Miri Piri Academy was doing his KRI Level One Teacher Training practicum and taught a Kundalini Yoga class for the first time. When we asked him what he had learned, he told us that he finally understood how challenging it is to teach when students in the class are spacing out, tired, or distracted and that he would make a better effort to participate fully when he was in a class from here forward. Often, it is only when our children have the opportunity to lead and to teach that they begin to understand how much impact their own attitude has on everyone around them. This is the seed of community consciousness.

Saraswati Khalsa Saraswati Kaur Khalsa is the Assistant Principal of Miri Piri Academy and has been serving there since 2007. She has been a student of Yogi Bhajan since birth and completed her Level One Kundalini Yoga Teacher training under his guidance. Saraswati holds a Master’s Degree in Social Work and has been working with children and schools since 1998. Her daughter also attends Miri Piri Academy as a student.

Jugat Guru Singh Jugat Guru Singh Khalsa is the Principal of Miri Piri Academy in Amritsar, India and a KRI Certified Lead Teacher Trainer. From his childhood, he was guided by Yogi Bhajan and has dedicated his life to serving the mission of Yogi Bhajan by helping to shape the next generation into leaders and teachers of this amazing technology. Jugat Guru Singh is a member of the Chardi Kala Jetha, which travels around the world teaching and performing Gurbani Kirtan, including local performances at the Golden Temple.




Yogi Bhajan Raising Children with Values and Virtues
10 Things to Give Your Children
  • Love them.
  • Build their self-esteem.
  • Challenge them.
  • Listen to them.
  • Expect respect.
  • Limit them.
  • Make God a part of their lives.
  • Develop a sense of learning in them.
  • Help them to be community-minded.
  • Let them go.







 



Aging: Maintaining Health and Functionality with Yoga by Nikhil Ramburn and Sat Bir Singh Khalsa, Ph.D

Aging Between 1960 and 1994, the population of those 85 years and older in the United States grew 274 percent and this fact, coupled with increased longevity, is significant since the elderly spend three times more on healthcare than their working counterparts. Therefore, it is important to understand better the pathophysiology of aging and possible therapies to slow its negative effects. The normal aging process results in several physiological changes. For example, there is alteration of pulmonary mechanics, respiratory muscle strength, gas exchange, and ventilatory control, which are the collective outcome of degradation to anatomical structures such as the bronchioles, alveoli, and intercostal muscles. The renal system is similarly affected by aging since the loss of the kidneys’ cortical tissue directly affects the filtration rate, which results in fluid and electrolyte abnormalities and eventual renal insufficiency. While specific pathological features have not been identified for gastrointestinal tract senescence, changes in neuromuscular function, changes in the structure of the gastrointestinal tract itself, and changes in the absorptive and secretory functions all alter normal gastrointestinal processes. Likewise, the size of the liver decreases after the age of 50, leading to decreases in protein synthesis, such as clotting factors. Common endocrine changes include menopause in women and a slow decline of testosterone in men. T-lymphocyte-mediated immunity is also impaired and the elderly are more susceptible to infections and communicable diseases. As far as neural changes, the elderly lose 6 percent to 11 percent of their brain cortex, which can lead to a decline in cognitive functioning and may also facilitate neurodegenerative processes such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and Huntington’s diseases.

As to the underlying mechanisms and contributors, genetics are estimated to explain only 35 percent of lifespan and the physical and cognitive declines of old age. Aging is in fact a multifactorial process that which includes lifestyle factors such as diet and stress. It is interesting that the only kind of diet so far associated with longevity is a plant-based diet as seen in epidemiological studies in Okinawa, Japan and Loma Linda in California amongst other so-called “blue zones” of long-lived populations. Social, family, and community support has also been a significant factor in determining health and mortality. Managing stress, maintaining a healthy weight, and regular physical activity can all promote longevity. Yoga may provide many of the benefits of exercise such as maintaining cardiovascular and respiratory function but can also lengthen telomeres, which are the ends of the chromosomes important for genomic integrity that are known to deteriorate with chronic stress and aging that are, therefore, genetic markers of cellular health and aging. Both healthy behaviors and mind-body interventions positively influence telomere integrity.

Given that mind-body practices, such as yoga, have positive influences on stress, resilience, and health-related behaviors, there is good evidence that yoga has a positive influence on aging. For example, certain meditative forms of yoga, such as Kundalini Yoga (Kirtan Kriya meditation specifically), have been found to increase cerebral blood flow in areas of the prefrontal cortex associated with attention and has been shown to enhance memory through increased connectivity in the default mode network (DMN) of the brain, an area commonly involved in neurodegenerative disorders. Yoga breathing practices (pranayama) may also contribute to longevity by reducing stress through increasing activity of the parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) and down-regulating the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis. Indeed, yogic breathing stimulates the afferent vagus nerves, which are the primary peripheral pathway of the PNS.

Yoga research has shown improvements in physical functioning in the elderly. In a recent meta-analysis, Australian and Swedish researchers reviewed six trials of relatively high methodological quality, totaling 307 participants, and found that yoga-based exercises resulted in small improvements in balance and medium improvements in physical mobility in people aged 60+ years old. Therefore, yoga may counteract immobility and fractures from falls which are both associated with senescence. A 2017 study at the Picardie Jules Verne University in France also found improvements in physical functioning, specifically proprioception. With aging, gait initiation is impacted due to functional degradation, but the researchers found that a group of elderly yoga practitioners had more lower leg muscle activation and a more stable gait initiation pattern when compared with a physically active group of elderly walkers. Lastly, a 32-week study from the University of Southern California (USC) compared twenty older adults averaging 70 years old who attended 60-minute Hatha yoga classes. The program incorporated physical postures as well as pranayama, and the results revealed significant improvements in physical function and lower-extremity strength, which correspond to the biomechanical improvements noted previously.

In addition, numerous cognitive benefits were found in the elderly who yoga practice. In a 2005 study conducted at the Psychiatric Neuroimaging Research Program of the Massachusetts General Hospital, researchers used magnetic resonance imaging to assess cortical thickness in 20 participants with extensive meditation experience. The participants were not monks, rather typical western meditation practitioners. While some were meditation teachers, others pursued traditional careers in fields such as law and healthcare. The researchers found that meditation may be associated with structural changes in areas of the brain that are important for sensory, cognitive, and emotional processing. These findings are significant, because they suggest that meditation may impact age-related declines in cortical structure. A subsequent study from the Israelita Albert Einstein Hospital in São Paulo, Brazil was the first study to examine the brain cortical thickness (CT) in elderly female yoga practitioners relative to controls. Twenty-one female elderly hatha yoga practitioners were recruited from the local yoga studios, and their brain CT was compared to 21 yoga-naive women of the same age, and physical activity. The study found significantly greater CT in the left prefrontal lobe in the women who had trained in yoga for a minimum of 8 years. These findings, once again, suggest that yoga practice may have a positive impact on mental health among the elderly through its neuroprotective effects.

Researchers have also investigated the impact of long-term yoga or meditation practice on fluid intelligence, a cognitive function involving the ability to solve new problems, use logic in new ways, and identify patterns. This capacity tends to peak early in life and decline as we enter old age. With the rapidly shifting technological landscape, the capacity to maintain fluid intelligence into old age will be critical in order to remain relevant and adaptive. In this study, fluid intelligence declined slower in long-term yoga practitioners and meditators relative to controls. The functional neural networks of yoga practitioners and meditators were also more resilient to damage compared to those of control subjects that did not practice. Furthermore, a study from the University of Illinois found that eight weeks of regular yoga practice resulted in improved working memory performance in sedentary older adults when compared to a stretching control group, thereby indicating that the mindfulness component of yoga is critical in its efficacy. These improvements were mediated by a decreased stress response as measured by salivary cortisol measurements (a biomarker of stress) and suggest that yoga may restore the balance in the stress-regulating systems in older adults, thereby preventing cognitive decline.

Studies in the field of molecular biology have shown that there are quantifiable changes with aging, specifically in genomic expression, in which changes in the activity of specific genes can be quantified as well as changes in the integrity of genes and telomeres. Since yoga can decrease oxidative damage to DNA and reduce cellular aging, researchers from the All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), the premier medical research and clinical institution in India set out to determine whether yoga can impact telomere stability. Their 2018 review of the literature revealed that yoga may have a protective effect on telomere length and the telomerase enzyme responsible for maintaining the telomeres. Indeed, yoga may upregulate enzymes that degrade reactive oxygen species (ROS), thereby preventing oxidative damage to telomeric DNA sequences, which may explain these findings. In another study, AIIMS researchers set out to explore cellular aging through a prospective single-arm study. After just 12 weeks of a yoga and meditation-based lifestyle intervention, 96 healthy individuals had significant improvements in biomarkers of cellular aging compared to baseline values. ROS and cortisol were significantly lower and telomerase activity significantly increased, suggesting a reduced rate of cellular aging in yoga practitioners.

In summary, these encouraging findings suggest that yoga may be a viable strategy to slow down the aging process and maintain both physical and cognitive health into old age. Future trials with larger cohorts and long-term follow-ups will help us better understand the mechanisms underlying the beneficial biochemical changes induced by yoga practices.

Nikhil Rayburn Nikhil Rayburn grew up practicing yoga under mango trees in the tropics. He is a certified Kundalini Yoga teacher and has taught yoga to children and adults in Vermont, New Mexico, Connecticut, India, France, and Mauritius. He is a regular contributor to the Kundalini Research Institute newsletter and explores current yoga research.

Sat Bir Singh Khalsa, Ph.D. Sat Bir Singh Khalsa, Ph.D. is the KRI Director of Research, Research Director for the Kripalu Center for Yoga & Health, and Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. He has practiced a Kundalini Yoga lifestyle since 1973 and is a KRI certified Kundalini Yoga instructor. He has conducted research on yoga for insomnia, stress, anxiety disorders, and yoga in public schools. He is editor in chief of the International Journal of Yoga Therapy and The Principles and Practice of Yoga in Health Care and author of the Harvard Medical School ebook Your Brain on Yoga.




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KRI December Recipe of the Month Excerpt from:
From Vegetables with Love:
Recipes and Tales from a Yogi’s Kitchen
Revised and Expanded Second Edition
Siri-Ved Kaur Khalsa

Pumpkin Bharta — Pumpkin Stew with Ginger and Tamarind


Pumpkin Bharta


Yield: 6 servings

2½ pounds pumpkin or kabocha squash
3 tablespoons oil or ghee
2 onions, chopped
2–3 tablespoons finely chopped fresh ginger
½ teaspoon turmeric
½ teaspoon black mustard seeds
½ teaspoon cinnamon
¼ teaspoon nutmeg
3 small serrano chiles, chopped finely
2 teaspoons tamarind concentrate
½ teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon honey
1 cup water
¼ cup chopped cilantro

Cut squash in half. Scoop out strings and seeds and place the halves cut side down on an oiled baking sheet. Bake at 425° until quite soft. Scoop out all the soft pulp and set aside. Discard remaining pumpkin shell.

Meanwhile, heat oil or ghee in a wok or sauté pan over medium-high heat and fry onions and ginger until browned (about 8 minutes). Add spices and green chiles and cook another 5–10 minutes, adding water as needed. Add cooked mashed pumpkin and reduce heat to medium. Add up to 1 cup of water for desired consistency. Add tamarind and honey and cook another 5–10 minutes. Use cilantro as garnish or mix into bharta and serve.

How To Sauté Without Oil It’s easy to sauté without oil, and most recipes in this book that call for oil or ghee to sauté ingredients can be adapted by using water instead. As the water will evaporate while cooking, it must be replenished every few minutes. The cooking time will also be longer. I recommend using a well-seasoned iron skillet for its naturally nonstick surface.


Trainer’s Corner

Trainer’s Forum


What is a Trainer Forum?
A Trainer Forum is a meeting place for open dialogue amongst members and applicants of the Aquarian Trainer Academy. It is an opportunity for professional development as a trainer. It is a time to come together as a community of trainers to refresh our spirit and revisit our values, build skills and share best practices, create new relationships and deepen existing ones. Key elements of every Trainer Forum include:

Peer to Peer Meetings – network and connect with your peers around the world
Global Decision Making – have your voice heard and participate in hot topic discussions
Workshops – interactive presentations on specialty areas led by both KRI and local trainers

We look forward to seeing you at an upcoming Forum! For more information visit:
http://trainersupport.kundaliniresearchinstitute.org/trainer-forum/


2018 – 2019 Trainer Forums
Theme: Culture, Communication, Community


Winter Solstice 2018: Hampton Inn, Lake Wales, Florida,
Sunday, December 16, 8:30am – 5:30pm
Register Here for Winter Solstice Trainer Forum

Chile 2019: Narayan Yoga, Providencia, Chile – NEW DAYS!
Sunday, January 27, 10:00am – 6:00pm & Monday, January 28, 10:00am – 2:00pm

Mexico 2019: Rama Yoga, Mexico City, Mexico
Tuesday, February 12, 9:30am – 6:30pm & Wednesday, February 13 9:30am – 1:30pm

Summer Solstice 2019: Hacienda de Guru Ram Das, Espanola, New Mexico
Wednesday, June 12, 8:30 – 5:30pm & Thursday, June 13, 8:30am – 12:30pm
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Europe 2019: Chateau Anand, Saint Pierre de Maille, France
Thursday, July 25, 8:30pm – 5:30pm & Friday, July 26, 8:30am – 12:30pm
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Australia 2019: TBA

China 2019: TBA
KRI October Newsletter

 






News From KRI - October

Kundalini Research Institute
The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings Endowment Fund



 

A Note From Nirvair Guru Ram DasSat Nam and Greetings from New Mexico. We celebrate Guru Ram Das’ birthday this month. Guru Ram Das was a humble man and a great saint and healer. Although he was born a poor child and was orphaned at a young age, he became the leader of the Sikhs and sat on the throne of Raj Yoga. Here is what Yogi Bhajan said about him in a lecture dated October 30, 1985: “The highest gift of this birthday of Guru Ram Das you can give to him is to be forgiving. That's how he was, very forgiving, very loving, the most compassionate. God took centuries and centuries and centuries, millions and millions and millions, zillions and zillions, zillions of year to create this whole cosmos. And out of all that, He figured out one self of Himself to produce in a human body – a personality, a psyche, a grace of His own representation. And we call it Ram Das, the servant of God. And that's what Guru Ram Das is – the most compassionate, the most creative, ever smiling in extreme... That's why we call on him [by chanting],
    ‘Dhan Dhan Ram Das Gur Jin Siriaa Tinai Savariaa, Pooree Hoee Karamat Aap Sirjan Haarai Dhaariya’ Blessed, Blessed is Guru Ram Das. He who created you has also exalted you. Perfect is your miracle. The Creator Lord Himself has installed you on the throne.
“The God creator Himself created this. Have no doubt about it. Even if you doubt, it won't work. Your anxiety creates insecurity, your insecurity creates doubt, and your doubt creates hell for you. But if it is true that you have to be anxious, why don't you create anxiety and anxiously wait and let Guru Ram Das’s compassion come through? Within you, through you, around you, and all of you. If that understanding is God, then you have to do one thing. Live in no guilt. You live in the guilt to the hilt, you don't appreciate yourself.” My “go to” mantra, in times of distress, is to chant “Guru Guru Wahe Guru, Guru Ram Das Guru.” It is my way of creating a space of peace and getting out of my predicament by giving it up to Infinity through my understanding of Guru Ram Das. It engages the bhakti facet of my personality. This month of Guru Ram Das, we also remember the passing of Yogi Bhajan on October 6, 2004. The night that he died, the entire ashram gathered at his Ranch and chanted from the heart to Guru Ram Das as they prepared his body to leave his Ranch for the last time. Even at that time of great sadness, the love of Guru Ram Das carried us high on wings of love. Try it for yourself and enjoy the peace and grace of Guru Ram Das. It always works for me.

 

Nirvair Singh Khalsa All love in Divine, Nirvair Singh Khalsa CEO KRI

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

A Crash of Thunder and All Things Change by Shanti Kaur Khalsa A Crash of ThunderFourteen years ago in the afternoon of October 6th, Yogi Bhajan breathed his last breath. At home on his Ranch, surrounded by family and students, he made that final journey and crossed into the subtle realm of spirit. For as long as I live, I will not forget the sounds, sights and sensations of that day. Yogi Bhajan had been ill for a long time and was bedridden. The week before, he had his students push his wheelchair around the ashram to look at and touch each and every thing along the way. And although he then pronounced to all that he would live another six years, this rare excursion from his Dome had the joyous feeling of a blessing and the somber weight of a last goodbye. On Monday, October 4th he started the process of withdrawing into that state of consciousness between life and death. Dark clouds gathered, and the afternoon was battered with thunderstorms. While that is a normal occurrence in summer monsoon season, by fall, New Mexico is usually graced with clear skies. But those three days in October, the sky roared and boomed like I had never seen before. On Wednesday afternoon, there was a wild, whooshing wind that ripped through the ashram with crashing thunder. I was not surprised when the phone call came that Yogi Bhajan had passed. When I arrived at the Ranch, Yogi Bhajan’s wife, Bibiji, was sitting in the living room with a tear-stained face. “Call everyone, Shanti,” she said. “Let them come say goodbye.” At such a time when the heart was crushed, it was a measure of her compassion that Bibiji thought of the sangat and the feelings of others over herself. Within the hour, the whole ashram gathered at the Ranch. Friends, family, students, and visitors alike sat together and chanted, “Guru Guru Wahe Guru, Guru Ram Das Guru.” In small groups of two or three, everyone had the chance to come into the Dome and say their personal farewell to their teacher. A Crash of ThunderFinally, when everything was ready, we opened the Dome door to bring his still body to the waiting ambulance. The sangat opened a path, and he was brought through the chanting crowd. As we shut the ambulance doors and it began its slow crunching roll over the gravel parking lot, I was struck with the reality that all things had suddenly changed. The chanting to Guru Ram Das rang in my ears and floated around me and carried my heart through the days ahead. Although Yogi Bhajan has been gone from this realm for 14 years, I still feel his presence in each Kundalini Yoga class, no matter where it is taught. His legacy flows through his teachings and these are a gift to us. I am grateful to the Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings for preserving his voice and his message, not only for me but for all his students and the generations of seekers and students to come. Shanti Kaur Shanti Kaur Khalsa is a wife, mother, grandmother and professional writer who brings Khalsa values to every aspect of life. She is an engaging Sikh teacher who brings the wisdom of Sikh history into modern life. Shanti spent more than twenty years studying with Siri Singh Sahib Bhai Sahib Harbhajan Singh Khalsa Yogiji who inspired her on the path of Sikhism. She is an inspired kirtania who travels worldwide giving inspirational kirtan and lecture programs.

 

 

 


 

Make God Part of Your Child’s Life By Jugat Guru Singh Khalsa and Saraswati Kaur Khalsa, Miri Piri Academy. Miri Piri Academy Yogi Bhajan told us that we should make “God” a part of our child’s life, but what does that mean? For some people, the concept of God is rooted deep in the dogmatic instruction of their youth. And while many have rejected that simplistic view, it is sometimes difficult to give voice to exactly what we think God is. The concept of God, as Yogi Bhajan shared with us, is not the concept of a magical-man in the sky. It is a Generating, Organizing, and Destroying energy that pervades the universe and all creation, including you and me. It is not something outside of us, but inside and all around us.
    “There is no God outside of you. Neither was, nor is, nor shall be. It is all in you. The very breath of life is divine.” – Yogi Bhajan, 8/22/1986
This concept of God, of the Divine Energy, is not exclusively a Sikh concept. It is a universal understanding that speaks to the vastness of the spirit and the divinity of every living being. Young children intuitively understand this, because they feel the flow of Divine Energy within themselves long before they can verbalize it. When you bring words to the experience, it is grounding and validating for them. By giving our children a relationship with God, the Divine, in whatever form or language preferred, we introduce them to the attitude and the altitude that will carry them through any challenge.
    “Guru says raise your caliber, raise your altitude, go higher, look at things from the heavens. From up high, when you look at the world... you'll find that things are very small, and they are not worth the attention [you give it].” – Yogi Bhajan, Gurdwara Lecture, 10/15/1995, Espanola, NM
Give them that altitude, to see life from an exalted perspective. When they understand their own divinity, they connect to the Creative Energy that can manifest change and profoundly impact the people and the world around them. Give them that awareness, to see that they are connected to all living beings, to see that their thoughts, their words, and their actions have an impact and an effect on others. This is an important step towards understanding the credo, “Recognize that the other person is you,” one of the five sutras of the Aquarian Age. Give them the humility to understand that life flows beyond the boundaries of their own ego and that all powers, talents, and riches in life are a gift. Even the power to teach and to serve is a gift easily given and taken away. Give them the habit of prayer so that they can relate to the Divine Self, beyond mind and body, and rise above their challenges to live in the spirit of Cherdi Kalaa (the ever-rising spirit). Give them God. God will never let them down. How do we do that? It seems like a complicated and difficult task, but it can be the most simple thing. Tell them who they are… Give them an experience of it… Repeat.
    “I was with the children in New Mexico and one child asked me ‘Where is God? How can I meet Him? And what is the best and the easiest way?’ Now, when a child asks you this, you have to come out with an answer whether you like it or not, and you cannot tell the small little children who trust you to wait one month... I said, ‘Son, it's very easy. When you breathe in, God comes in you. When you breathe out, you go into God. And if there is anything more than this, then there is no God and neither there is you.’” – Yogi Bhajan, Gurdwara Lecture, 2/12/1989, Espanola, NM
Miri Piri Academy When my daughter was two years old, she made up a song and repeated it constantly in the interminable hours we spent together at the swing-set. “1,2,3, God is with me, 1,2,3 God is with me” she used to chant over and over again. This is still my fondest memory of her childhood. This simple mantra wasn’t a reflection of her advanced understanding, or of my exceptional parenting; it was just a product of her surroundings. At Miri Piri Academy (MPA), God - the Divine Energy, is a tangible part of everyday life. We experience it in seva at the Golden Temple, Japji Sahib in the morning, Ardas (prayer) before school, Kundalini Yoga in the afternoon, meditation and chanting together in the evenings, and stories before bedtime. This is our life at MPA, and you can create this simple routine no matter where you are. Breathe in. Breathe out. Make God a part of your life together.

 

 

Saraswati Khalsa Saraswati Kaur Khalsa is the Assistant Principal of Miri Piri Academy and has been serving there since 2007. She has been a student of Yogi Bhajan since birth and completed her Level One Kundalini Yoga Teacher training under his guidance. Saraswati holds a Master’s Degree in Social Work and has been working with children and schools since 1998. Her daughter also attends Miri Piri Academy as a student.

 

Jugat Guru Singh Jugat Guru Singh Khalsa is the Principal of Miri Piri Academy in Amritsar, India and a KRI Certified Lead Teacher Trainer. From his childhood, he was guided by Yogi Bhajan and has dedicated his life to serving the mission of Yogi Bhajan by helping to shape the next generation into leaders and teachers of this amazing technology. Jugat Guru Singh is a member of the Chardi Kala Jetha, which travels around the world teaching and performing Gurbani Kirtan, including local performances at the Golden Temple.

 

 

 

 


 

 

Yogi Bhajan Raising Children with Values and Virtues 10 Things to Give Your Children
  • Love them.
  • Build their self-esteem.
  • Challenge them.
  • Listen to them.
  • Expect respect.
  • Limit them.
  • Make God a part of their lives.
  • Develop a sense of learning in them.
  • Help them to be community-minded.
  • Let them go.

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Sat Nam from The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings® Library of Teachings Guru Ram Das Sat Nam from The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings! October brings beautiful fall weather here in New Mexico, a reminder of the changing of the season and the slowing down from the busy summer months. October also brings the remembrance of Yogi Bhajan’s life as we honor his passing on October 6th and the celebration of Guru Ram Das’s Birthday on October 9th. Guru Ram Das Ji is known to many as the “Lord of Miracles,” and he held a special place in Yogi Bhajan’s heart. Over the years, Yogi Bhajan taught us of Guru Ram Das Ji’s ability to manifest miracles, emphasizing Guru Ji’s qualities of selfless service, humility, grace, healing, kindness, and protection. In 1995, Yogi Bhajan shared how we can live Guru Ram Das’s teachings: “Nothing matters, whether you are one or you are one million. It doesn't matter if you are pure or you are the ugliest human creature. It doesn't matter if you are fire and flamboyant and beautiful and your features are excellent or you are not worth looking at, let us put it that way. But whenever time and place, desh and kaal, confronts you and your compassion doesn't win - you are a dead man. And whenever there is a temptation and your value doesn't win - you are a rotten person. These are two practical things. Let me tell you the third. Whenever you are not you and your words couldn't come out divine, compassionate, sweet, uplifting, and elevating, you have lost the game of life. All that is what is put together as Guru Ram Das. Where man can excel, you don't have to control the whole world. You don't have to rule the universe. You don't have to show people you are rich or you are poor, you are great or you are small. All you have to show is to yourself. You have to win yourself, you have to conquer yourself, and you have to live yourself. That is what Guru Ram Das tells us. Let compassion win and let yourself win...” © The Teachings of Yogi Bhajan, October 30th, 1985 Treat yourself, and watch or listen to this entire lecture. As always, it is full of inspiring gems from Yogi Bhajan. This is a powerful time to make your prayers! If you need a miracle in your life right now, focus your prayer/mediation on the generous spirit of Guru Ram Das Ji.
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We cannot thank you, our beloved donors, enough! Your steadfast generosity is so inspiring and is what keeps this free online resource evolving, expanding and becoming a complete resource of Yogi Bhajan’s precious teachings. Thank you for all that you do! In Gratitude, Shabd Simran Shabd Simran Kaur Adeniji, Fundraising Coordinator The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings® Kundalini Research Institute Email: donations@kriteachings.org Find us on Facebook “The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachingswww.libraryofteachings.com

 

 

The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings® is a non-profit organization and all donations are tax deductible under IRS code 501(c)(3).

 

 


 

 

Research on Yoga as a Therapeutic Intervention for Prostate Cancer by Nikhil Ramburn and Sat Bir Singh Khalsa, Ph.D Therapeutic Intervention for Prostate Cancer The prostate gland is part of the male reproductive system and is located just below the bladder and in front of the rectum. Cancer of the prostate manifests as an abnormal proliferation of cells. Although some men do not have any symptoms, prostate cancer is typically associated with painful or burning urination, blood in the urine or semen, difficulty emptying the bladder, and painful ejaculation. While researchers do not know the exact causes of prostate cancer, they have determined that certain genetic changes, whether inherited or acquired during a person’s lifetime, contribute to the disease. According to the American Cancer Society, a high consumption of red meat or high fat dairy products slightly increases the risk, while other risk factors include radiation or chemical exposure, older age (typically over 40), and a family history of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in American men after skin cancer and is the second leading cause of cancer death with about 1 in 41 men predicted to die from this disease. Although there are now a variety of conventional treatments for prostate cancer including surgeries, radiation, hormone therapy, and chemotherapy among others, reports suggest that 25-50 percent of prostate cancer patients use at least one complementary and integrative medicine modality. Acupuncture is popular and effective among patients who experience hot flashes as a side-effect of androgen-deprivation therapy for prostate cancer. A 2013 review of the literature on exercise and cancer found that populations who were more active had less side effects from anticancer therapy and greater chances of recovery. Yoga offers many of the benefits of exercise, but in addition, yoga is likely to also better improve stress, mood, pain perception, and self-efficacy in patients with cancer. Indeed, research has shown that yoga can improve quality of life and sleep-related outcomes in patients with lymphoma and breast cancer. The 8-week Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction program, which incorporates meditation, body scan, and gentle yoga, in an early pilot study on 10 patients with early stage prostate cancer and 59 patients with breast cancer, showed significant improvements in overall quality of life scores, symptoms of stress, and sleep quality. The improvements in quality of life were associated with a decrease in activation of the stress hormone – cortisol. A follow-up study reported significant improvements at 6 and 12 months, showing that improvements in stress were maintained and that cortisol levels continued to decrease systematically over the course of the follow-up. The patients’ immune systems were likewise improved with a reduction in levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In addition to stress, epidemiological data suggests that lifestyle choices such as diet may play an important role in cancer prevention. In 2003, in order to elucidate the effect of diet on prostate cancer, the lab of Dr. Dean Ornish (a pioneer of plant-based dietary intervention) conducted the Prostate Cancer Lifestyle Trial (PCLT), a randomized controlled trial (RCT), in which 93 men were assigned to either a control group or a vegan diet intervention group. The diet consisted of low-fat foods, legumes (including soy), whole grains, fruits and vegetables. In addition, the patients participated in stress management, psychosocial group support, and exercise programs including gentle yoga-based stretching, breathing, and meditation – this could therefore be considered a yoga lifestyle program. Adherence by intervention group participants was excellent at greater than 80 percent. They had a 4 percent decrease in prostate specific antigen (PSA, a measure of disease severity) whereas the non-intervention control patients had a 6 percent increase in PSA and 6 of those patients had to resort to conventional cancer treatment. Furthermore, no patients in the lifestyle intervention group needed radiation, surgery, or androgen deprivation therapy. Finally, when researchers exposed in vitro cancer cells to the serum of the lifestyle group patients, they observed 8 times more cancer growth inhibition than the control group serum, suggesting that this treatment approach had significant effects at the cellular and molecular level. Cancer diagnosis and treatment is associated with significant psychosocial problems including stress, anxiety, denial, and exacerbated conflict with partners that needs to be addressed. Interviews with 44 of the participants in the PCLT group of the study after one year found that the lifestyle change intervention resulted in greater overall optimism and hope. In addition, patients experienced greater emotional availability and decreased conflict with their partners. Subsequent follow-up data also revealed significantly improved lifestyle behaviors compared with controls resulting in enhanced health-related quality of life (HR-QOL) scores and decreased stress. After 2 years, 27 percent of control group patients had reverted to conventional cancer treatment compared to less than 5 percent of the lifestyle group patients. These encouraging findings suggest that early-stage prostate cancer patients may be able to avoid or delay conventional treatment for at least 2 years by making changes in their diet and lifestyle. Although the PCLT improvements in quality of life and mood and in the inhibition of cancer growth are important, molecular and biological outcomes, as strong objective outcome measures, are very worthy of analysis. Telomeres, which are protective DNA–protein complexes at the end chromosomes tend to shorten with disease and serve as a prognostic marker of risk, progression, and mortality in many types of cancer. In a pilot study funded by the US Department of Defense, Dr. Ornish and colleagues looked at the effects of a 3-month comprehensive lifestyle modification (with similar dietary and yoga-related practices to the PCLT) on 30 men with early stage prostate cancer. They found significantly increased levels of telomerase (the enzyme that counteracts telomere shortening). The researchers also identified significant modulation of biological processes that have critical roles in tumor growth and concluded that the intervention may change gene expression in the prostate. Remarkably, in the 5-year follow-up to this study, the relative telomere length in the experimental group continued increasing from baseline but decreased in the control group, therefore suggesting that long-term adherence to lifestyle changes can reverse damage to chromosomes. The first study to examine the feasibility and benefit of a yoga program for prostate cancer survivors and their support persons was conducted by researchers at the University of Calgary in Canada. The yoga sessions ran weekly for 7 weeks and were 75 minutes in length. Participants were guided through gentle breathing, increasingly challenging yoga postures (as their flexibility improved over the 7 weeks) and 15 minutes of final relaxation in Shavasana pose. All the study participants, including their care-givers, reported significant improvements with regard to stress, fatigue, and mood after yoga. The researchers concluded that yoga therapy for prostate cancer survivors is a feasible intervention due to the high program adherence rate and the acute benefits for all participants. In another landmark study, researchers from Neha Vapiwala’s lab at the University of Pennsylvania looked at the feasibility of an intensive yoga intervention for prostate cancer patients receiving outpatient radiotherapy. Although 18 of the 45 patients who started the program were unable to attend the requisite minimum number of yoga classes due to conflict with their radiation treatment times and the yoga class schedule, 12 of the remaining 27 participants attended over 50 percent of the classes. The results revealed reassuringly stable scores in erectile dysfunction, urinary incontinence, and quality of life. This prompted the researchers to conclude that a structured yoga intervention of twice-weekly classes was feasible for the cancer patients during a 6-9 week course of outpatient radiotherapy. They then conducted an RCT in which experimental group participants received twice-weekly yoga interventions over the 6- to 9-week courses of radiation therapy. Throughout the treatment, the yoga cohort reported significantly less fatigue than the controls. The sexual health scores and QOL emotional scores were also significantly higher in the yoga group. In summary, these encouraging albeit preliminary findings suggest that yoga may be a viable complementary treatment for prostate cancer patients. The findings support the need for validation with larger cohorts and methods such as electronic activity tracking to better understand the underlying biochemical changes induced by the yoga practices. Future studies should address the previous limitations of attrition, unaccounted comorbid factors, bias, and small sample sizes. Future trials can also help us better understand the barriers to continued participation in yoga for prostate cancer survivors.

 

Nikhil Rayburn Nikhil Rayburn grew up practicing yoga under mango trees in the tropics. He is a certified Kundalini Yoga teacher and has taught yoga to children and adults in Vermont, New Mexico, Connecticut, India, France, and Mauritius. He is a regular contributor to the Kundalini Research Institute newsletter and explores current yoga research.

 

 

 

Sat Bir Singh Khalsa, Ph.D. Sat Bir Singh Khalsa, Ph.D. is the KRI Director of Research, Research Director for the Kripalu Center for Yoga & Health, and Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. He has practiced a Kundalini Yoga lifestyle since 1973 and is a KRI certified Kundalini Yoga instructor. He has conducted research on yoga for insomnia, stress, anxiety disorders, and yoga in public schools. He is editor in chief of the International Journal of Yoga Therapy and The Principles and Practice of Yoga in Health Care and author of the Harvard Medical School ebook Your Brain on Yoga.

 

 

 

 

 


 



KRI October Specials of the Month I Am a Woman: Creative, Sacred & InvincibleI Am a Woman: Creative, Sacred & Invincible Selected Lectures from the Women's Teachings Yogi Bhajan, PhD, Master of Kundalini Yoga Retail: $39.95 Promo: $33.96

 

 


 

I Am a Woman: Creative, Sacred & InvincibleI Am a Woman: Creative, Sacred & Invincible Essential Kriyas for Women in the Aquarian Age Yogi Bhajan, PhD, Master of Kundalini Yoga Retail: $29.95 Promo: $25.46

 

 


 

I Am a Woman DVD Series
I Am a Woman DVD Series 3 Sets of Lectures from the Women's Teachings of Yogi Bhajan, PhD, Master of Kundalini Yoga I Am a Woman: Practicing Kindness, (Volumes 1-5) 1. Create Your Reality 2. Spiritual Acceleration 3. Act Great and Never Be Turned by Fate 4. Know Yourself 5. The Art of Appreciation I Am a Woman: Conscious Compassion, (Volumes 6-10) 6. The Known and Unknown 7. The Primal Force of Life 8. Communicating With Compassion 9. The Law of Life 10. Being Me: My Actions Define my Reality I Am A Woman: The Creativity of the Creator, Volumes (11-15) 11. Creativity through Communication 12. A Woman's Impact 13. Resolve Your Inner Conflicts 14. The Art of Being a Woman 15. Intuitive Applied Knowledge Retail: $19.95 per DVD Promo: $16.96 per DVD Or $74.95 for any 1 of the 3 full sets of DVDs, a 25% discount over retail.

KRI October Recipe of the Month Potent Potato Soup Excerpt From: From Vegetables, With Love: Recipes and Tales from a Yogi’s Kitchen (Revised and Expanded New Edition) Siri-Ved Kaur Khalsa Yield: 1 generous serving This is my version of “chicken soup” and the yogi’s go-to recipe for fighting off a cold or flu. Feel free to add other vegetables as desired such as chopped mustard greens, chard, celery, cauliflower, and peas. I suggest you cut the lemon in wedges so those who prefer may easily avoid or remove them from their soup bowl. Otherwise, cut the lemon half into thin slices; this is a more palatable size to bite into. The cooked lemon peel is quite a tasty surprise.
Potent Potato Soup
2 quarts water 2 pounds potatoes, cut in large bite-size pieces (any variety will do) ½ cup ghee or oil 2 onions, chopped ¼ cup minced fresh ginger (or more to taste) 10 cloves garlic, minced ½ lemon, deseeded and cut into 2 or 3 wedges 2 teaspoons turmeric 1 tablespoon caraway seeds 1 teaspoon pepper ½ teaspoon cardamom seeds (seeds from 6-8 pods) 1 teaspoon crushed red chilies ½ teaspoon cinnamon powder ¼ teaspoon ground cloves 2 quarts water Tamari soy sauce to taste Heat ghee in a heavy bottomed soup pot over a medium-high flame. Add onions, garlic, and ginger and sauté until browned (8-10 minutes), stirring often. Now add lemon and spices and sauté for another 3-5 minutes, adding small amounts of water if necessary to prevent scorching. Add 2 quarts of water and bring to a boil. Add potatoes, return to a boil, and simmer until potatoes are very well done (20-30 minutes). Add tamari soy sauce to taste.
KRI September Newsletter

 


 


 

A Note From Nirvair Nirvair SinghSat Nam and Greetings from New Mexico. We just completed our 2018 Level One Teacher Training Immersion in Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan® in New Mexico USA. What a wonderful training program and great group of trainers! Our Lead Trainer, Sat Siri Kaur, was an exceptional leader and an inspiration for all. The experience the students and teachers had was one of the best ever! The deep bonds that this international group of students created with each other, and the profound inspiration of Yogi Bhajan’s teachings, was very special. Please join us in 2019 as a student, or if you are in the Aquarian Trainer Academy, as a Trainer in Training. Become a teacher and serve your world. It is a rich and deep experience. Fall is the time of the equinox and the beginning of the school session in the Northern Hemisphere. Many Kundalini Yoga teacher trainings also start this time of year. You can sign up for Level One Teacher Training almost anywhere in the world and learn the technology of Kundalini Yoga, meditation, and lifestyle. The core of all Level One KRI Certified Trainings is that the students have a wonderful experience that prepares them to teach Kundalini Yoga and serve in the Aquarian Age. No matter where you train, you will find a consistent quality of expertise, love, care, and attention. Yogi Bhajan’s impact on the world has been truly amazing. We have trainings in over 50 countries listed in the KRI Trainer and Program Directory. I get deeply immersed in the Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings® on a daily basis, searching for topics, concepts, and wisdom. What an amazing resource! I always like to share some technology or insight with you that has inspired me. Here, Yogi Bhajan talks about the importance of the equinoxes: “Today is the most important day in every human’s life. It's the equinox. We who have become civilized are the most uncivilized people. Over time, we have forgotten everything about the heavens. Through our scientific mind, we feel Jupiter just hangs there [in space]. The moon just hangs there — they are there, and we are here. Religion didn't help us either— Why [do you think] the Muslims have Ramadan? Why do people have seasonal celebrations? We were much better when we were simple. Then, we understood nature. Now, we conquer nature, harness nature and the resources, [and as a result] we have become weaker, vague. We thought through philosophies, through beliefs, through faith, that we would earn happiness. We didn't want to do the research and that is why, at certain times in the centuries, religion became most important. Religion became our reality and guidance for us, but we forgot there is a universe and we are part of the universe — and there is an inter-exchange which will never change.” Yogi Bhajan, 3/20/91 “So dear friends, this evening we were feeling the presence of those who brought us, through their spirit, the possibility of celebrating this beautiful day. Today, the equinox, light and darkness meet on equal footing. Nobody is high today — nobody is low. We are all one. There is one God of all gods, and there is one humanity. We are all beings, that is the spirit of man, and this spirit has to be held up. Do as much yoga as you like to do. You may have occult powers, the whole world may worship you, but if you do not know the oneness of you, you are useless.” Yogi Bhajan, 9/22/73 KRI has many resources for student and teachers. Last summer I was studying the manual entitled, “Man to Man” for a class I co-taught at Summer Solstice Sadhana. It was really fun to rediscover those classes. The book has lectures and technologies from Yogi Bhajan’s classes for men. Visit our online store, The Source, or The Source E-book Store for this book and other great books and manuals on Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan.

 

Nirvair Singh Khalsa Nirvair Singh Khalsa CEO KRI

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Deepening your Core Capacity at Level Two Mind and Meditation Mind and Meditation

 

This summer I had the blessing of taking the KRI Level Two Mind & Meditation module in Espanola, NM. I had taken Lifestyles & Lifecycles eons ago but had not participated as a learner with a “beginner’s mind” for a very long time. Whereas the Level One program gives the Foundations of Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan, the Level Two modules are about Transformation and deepening your core capacities, character, and consciousness. In the words of Yogi Bhajan, “I am just trying to make you change, because you want to change but you don’t change. I know you. It is very difficult for you to leave your habits. First we create habits and then our habits create us.” Six days of intensive study with our four extraordinary trainers from South Africa, Canada, and the United States, along with the Master himself through daily video classes, answered a personal prayer — to have the time and opportunity to delve more deeply into my Self after decades of “doing” in the world. Over fifty students from around the world came to do the hard work, as described by Guru Nanak, of “Conquer your own mind and you will conquer the world”. I observed and experienced unique qualities in this group, even as we were all working on ourselves. There was always kindness, generosity, compassion, humor, and love in the room. A key component of the training program is ongoing personal meditations, journaling, and small group meetings for ninety days – transformation doesn’t happen in a New York minute! A few members of my small group offered to share their experience for this article. “I would recommend “Mind and Meditation” Level Two Teacher Training to every teacher. The level of teaching went beyond my expectation. The content of the program is rich, illuminating, and expanding. It has accelerated my spiritual growth and development and catalyzed a new depth in my own practice. In this training I achieved a level of depth and understanding of the mind that I have not been able to reach before. I am deeply grateful for these teachings and these teachers.” Liv Amrita Kaur “As always, the precise curation of the teachings – the commitment of time and devoted labor by all who serve this work of Love – awakens my heart. The program design conveys a wealth of information in a short time, while inviting compassion and personal depth. The leaders are clear, purpose-full…and fun! Mind & Meditation set me on a whole new course with my practice and my teaching.” Dharam Inder Kaur “My psychic fields were cleared out, my personal sadhana was deeply strengthened, and I received wisdom and practices that I know will support me and the students I share them with for many years to come. Creating the space in my life to take this training, surrounded and supported by other Kundalini Yoga teachers, was one of the best investments of time, energy, and money I’ve made this year. The gift that keeps on giving. Mind & Meditation was my second Level Two module, after taking Vitality & Stress. Together they are super powerful!” Christine Arylo, Feminine Leadership Advisor and Author We hope to see you next summer for Vitality & Stress! Blessings to all, Sangeet Kaur Khalsa (Espanola) Sangeet Kaur Khalsa Sangeet Kaur discovered her singing voice at the age of 8, and studied music performance at the University of Toronto. After several years of singing with Canada’s first professional chamber choir, she became a longtime student/teacher of Yogi Bhajan in 1978. Sangeet Kaur is well-known as an accomplished singer and recording artist. She serves tirelessly in her local Sikh community, in her home studio, and via the internet --mentoring others to find their own true voices.

 

 

 

 

 


 

SAVE THE DATE – Vitality & Stress in New Mexico Vitality & Stress
KRI Level 2 Certification Program in Kundalini Yoga as Taught by Yogi Bhajan® June 23 - 30, 2019 Espanola, New Mexico
Vitality already exists within you. Many of the kriyas and meditations in Kundalini Yoga gradually build and circulate energy within you, removing blocks and releasing stress. Free yourself of tension. Give yourself a chance. Join Senior Trainers at the Mother Ashram for this transformational Level 2 module, Vitality & Stress. Plan to stay in Espanola after Summer Solstice to continue studying with KRI's International Teacher Training Program. Registration opens November 15th. View details on the Level 2 Program website. "Once you are content, everything will come to you. When you are discontent, everything will go away from you. This law applies to you and beyond you. With elementary stress you can never be content." -Yogi Bhajan, November 8, 1989

 

 


 

Limit Them – Building the Confidence to Succeed in Unlimited Environments By Jugat Guru Singh Khalsa and Saraswati Kaur Khalsa, Miri Piri Academy. Miri Piri Academy A child wants to be strong to face tomorrow. That's what a child wants, but the child is not trained that way. They are protected – not prepared. So naturally, children have to revolt and they can't take their parents' proclamation, “I want to protect you.” What for? What are you protecting them from? Prepare him, prepare her. -Yogi Bhajan April 17, 1993 Today I dropped my daughter off at the airport for another year at Miri Piri Academy. She was not happy about going to school this year and it was a difficult morning with tears and silence and anger. We had been discussing all summer the reasons I have made the decision for her to return to MPA again, but despite hearing and understanding my reasons, she wanted to try something different. She felt that she was missing-out on some alternate experience of teenage life that she desperately wanted to try. As a parent, these are some of the hardest moments. The moments when we put our foot down, when we limit our children’s choices, when they cry or scream or protest repeatedly, and we have to stick to our decisions regardless of their anger or sadness. These are the moments when we have to remind ourselves that we are here not just to protect our children, but to prepare them. Setting limits is an important part of that preparation. Ultimately, we want our children to recognize that they are part of the Infinite, that their spirit is vast and they have the capacity to transcend the limitations imposed by their communities, environments, and especially their own fears and mental patterns. The purpose of setting limits on our children’s environments and choices is to give them an opportunity to build their confidence, skills, and awareness for that moment when it is time to transcend those limits, even those limits that we have set for them. So first, a person learns only in limited environments. And when they become perfect in the perfection of their own confidence in limited environments, then they can tackle unlimited environments. Yogi Bhajan, March 11, 1974 By setting limits we teach them how to navigate life where every choice has constraints and consequences. We teach them the skill of recognizing how to work within limits when necessary and how to overcome limits when circumstances demand it. Whether it’s a uniform, a schedule, limited screen-time, curfew, or school choice, as parents we set limits not only to protect our children but to prepare them to successfully navigate the maze of life. Every situation presents choices, positive and negative, and challenges to our beliefs about what we want to do or are capable of doing. Children will question and challenge every limitation, discovering within themselves new capacities and skills to work within those boundaries or the acumen to decide to transcend them. Ultimately, as they gain confidence in themselves, they will discover ways around the limitations that are no longer serving them and respect for those limits that are valuable. For example, our younger and newer students protest bitterly about the daily one-hour screen-time limit at MPA. However, by the time they graduate they nearly always express appreciation for the opportunity to really be present with each other. When my daughter inevitably grows in confidence, knowledge, discipline, and self-awareness, she will one day be ready for that alternate experience she is looking for. In a thousand ways, large and small, we prepare our children for life by setting boundaries so that they can grow strong enough to stand tall and transcend any limitation, real or imagined, that is holding them back.

 

 

Saraswati Khalsa Saraswati Kaur Khalsa is the Assistant Principal of Miri Piri Academy and has been serving there since 2007. She has been a student of Yogi Bhajan since birth and completed her Level One Kundalini Yoga Teacher training under his guidance. Saraswati holds a Master’s Degree in Social Work and has been working with children and schools since 1998. Her daughter also attends Miri Piri Academy as a student.

 

Jugat Guru Singh Jugat Guru Singh Khalsa is the Principal of Miri Piri Academy in Amritsar, India and a KRI Certified Lead Teacher Trainer. From his childhood, he was guided by Yogi Bhajan and has dedicated his life to serving the mission of Yogi Bhajan by helping to shape the next generation into leaders and teachers of this amazing technology. Jugat Guru Singh is a member of the Chardi Kala Jetha, which travels around the world teaching and performing Gurbani Kirtan, including local performances at the Golden Temple.

 

 

 

 


 

 

Yogi Bhajan Raising Children with Values and Virtues 10 Things to Give Your Children
  • Love them.
  • Build their self-esteem.
  • Challenge them.
  • Listen to them.
  • Expect respect.
  • Limit them.
  • Make God a part of their lives.
  • Develop a sense of learning in them.
  • Help them to be community-minded.
  • Let them go.

 

 

 

 

 


 

The History of Self-Regulation: Early Western Medical Interest By Sat Bir Singh Khalsa, Ph.D. Yoga and Meditation for Epilepsy The ability to self-regulate internal states, either physical, mental, or emotional, is a fundamental construct underlying not only the field of mind-body medicine (which includes yoga), but also much of what is in the broader field of behavioral medicine. The practices in this realm include cognitive and meditation skills, relaxation techniques, and the contemplative mind-body practices of yoga, tai chi, and qi gong. Through these practices, one acquires the skills of regulating functions including physical movement, respiratory activity, cardiovascular functions, and cognitive and emotional activity and reactivity. Research studies have confirmed that yoga practice can lead to significant improvements in muscular tension, neuro-muscular activity and coordination, basal respiratory rate, blood pressure, heart rate, cognitive performance, meta-cognition, and management of mental stress and reactivity of emotion. The control of some of these functions is mediated through the direct command of the central nervous system including the ability to consciously relax muscles and change respiration rate – this is somewhat self-evident. What has been of more interest scientifically, with respect to self-regulation, is the ability to exert control over processes believed to be automatically regulated, such as the autonomic nervous system, which can affect changes in the activity of internal organs and functions including heart activity, blood pressure, and metabolic rate. This is because historically, and even currently, in the field of medicine these activities have been believed to be out of the control of conscious will. One of the most well-known measures of this self-regulation of autonomic function is heart rate. Historically, what is of particular interest, are the early descriptions of instances/cases in the West that have suggested the feasibility of this kind of self-regulation. William James was a very notable philosopher, psychologist, medical doctor, and Harvard faculty in the late 19th century. In fact, the Department of Psychology on the Harvard University campus now bears his name, William James Hall. He was a pioneer in the field of psychology who gained widespread recognition from his seminal 1890 textbook The Principles of Psychology, a tome of 1,200 pages taking 12 years to complete. He also had the opportunity to interact personally with yoga master and proponent Swami Vivekananda during his visits to Boston in the late 1800’s. This influenced his work in research on contemplative states and practices, and meditation specifically, culminating in his landmark 1902 book The Varieties of Religious Experience. He was one of the early academics to recognize and describe the mind-body interaction and the capacity for self-regulation. In his 1890 text he wrote a clear statement of the mind-body connection: “Mental states occasion also changes in the calibre of blood-vessels, or alteration in the heart-beats, or processes more subtle still, in glands and viscera. …it will be safe to lay down the general law that no mental modification ever occurs which is not accompanied or followed by a bodily change.” He then cites cases of “exceptional individuals” reporting direct effects on the heart rate at will –a famous medical anecdote of a Colonel Townsend who could stop his heart at will and a 1889 report on voluntary control of the heart by a Dr. S.A. Pease. The case of Colonel Townsend can be traced back to its first description by George Cheyne M.D. in his 1733 book A Treatise of Diseases of all Kinds. He recounts being called to examine Townsend with two medical colleagues near the end of his life, as he was on his death bed suffering from a terminal disease. It was Townsend’s wish to convey to them an experience/phenomenon in which “…composing himself, he could die or expire when he pleased, and yet by an effort or somehow, he could come to life again.” Despite cautions by the doctors not to do a demonstration given his condition, the Colonel insisted, and Cheyne describes the event of that morning.
    “We all three felt his pulse first: it was distinct, tho small and [weak]: and his heart had its usual beating. He composed himself on his back, and lay in a still posture some time: while I held his right hand, Dr. Baynard laid his hand on his heart, and Mr. Skrine held a clean [mirror] to his mouth. I found his pulse sink gradually, till at last I could not feel any, by the most exact and nice touch. Dr. Baynard could not feel the least motion in his heart nor Mr. Skrine the least soil of breath on the bright mirror he held to his mouth; then each of us by turns examined his arm, heart and breath but could not by the nicest scrutiny discover the least symptom of life in him.”
They then began to conclude that he had gone too far and had actually died. Surprisingly, after a half-hour he showed signs of life.
    “As we were going away, we observed some motion about the body, and upon examination, found his pulse and the motion of his heart gradually returning: he began to breath gently and speak softly: we were all astonished to the last degree at this unexpected change, and after some further conversation with him, and among ourselves, went away fully satisfied as to all the particulars of this fact, but confounded and puzzled, and not able to form any rational scheme that might account for it.”.
Townsend died the next evening, leaving an intriguing anecdote about his possibility of controlling his heart. The 1889 5-page report by Pease in the Boston Medical and Surgical Journal, the first U.S. medical journal and precursor to the New England Journal of Medicine, was entitled “Voluntary Control of the Heart”. In this paper he contended that “… we have now evidence that there are gifted individuals who have a certain amount of direct control over it” and noting that previously “physiologists have long been aware of the close relationship between the heart’s action and that of the brain; yet, for lack of sufficient evidence, have not granted that any direct control over the heart could be induced by a simple effort of the will”. He then recounts several anecdotes/cases of simple willful direct control of heart rate (including the Townsend report) distinguishing these from anecdotes describing an indirect effect on the heart rate due to physical/mechanical manipulation of the vagus nerve (such as physical pressure on the neck) or forced evocation of mental imagery or emotion (such as sadness). One of the cases he mentions describes the research by a Russian physician on an individual who was able to increase his heart rate, through direct willful control, by up to 35 beats per minute. Dr. Pease then presented a detailed analysis of heart, breath, and blood pressure recordings of an individual at Harvard Medical School who was also capable of increasing his heart rate, in this case by about 25 beats per minute. From his analysis, he concluded that this change was indeed through simple willful control or pure self-regulation of heart rate. These articles and reports on control of heart rate occurring so early in the field of Western medicine indicate the early openness to the possibility and concept of the self-regulation of internal state. Once reports appeared in the West from India on advanced yogis who claimed the ability to self-regulate internal states, it was not so surprising that scientists began studies on these yogis. Ultimately, those studies provided a foundation for further research, the evolution of the field of biofeedback, and ultimately to our work in modern yoga research, which has expanded to studying the self-regulatory capabilities of yoga practices to change many internal psychophysiological functions. Most of these were believed to be out of the range of self-regulation, and most of modern medicine is still under that impression.

 

Sat Bir Singh Khalsa, Ph.D. Sat Bir Singh Khalsa, Ph.D. is the KRI Director of Research, Research Director for the Kripalu Center for Yoga & Health, and Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. He has practiced a Kundalini Yoga lifestyle since 1973 and is a KRI certified Kundalini Yoga instructor. He has conducted research on yoga for insomnia, stress, anxiety disorders, and yoga in public schools. He is editor in chief of the International Journal of Yoga Therapy and The Principles and Practice of Yoga in Health Care and author of the Harvard Medical School ebook Your Brain on Yoga.

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Sat Nam from The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings® Library of Teachings Sat Nam from The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings! We have just completed this year’s Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings Endowment Fund campaign. Your contributions, big and small, are all an important part of our success. Building the Endowment Fund will be a project for many years to come, Thank you! Our prayer is that over time we can raise enough funds to create an endowment fund of $11 million to support the Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings in perpetuity. This may sound like a lofty goal, but as Yogi Bhajan said;
“Those who will serve this path and serve the future, shall feel liberated by their own virtue.” Yogi Bhajan June 20th,1993
As many of us have experienced, the teachings of Yogi Bhajan continue to touch people’s lives in very profound ways. At the Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings we are dedicated to extending his teachings out into the world through this online database so that they may continue to touch and transform individuals for many years to come. Join us in our mission as we continue this work. Your gift to the Endowment Fund will secure the Library for many years to come. Call us at 855-519-4790 to find out how you can become part of serving this legacy.
“May you ever live as a light for the sake of all those who have to come with you and for the generations to follow.“ Yogi Bhajan July 8th, 1998

 

Library of Teachings Donation
In Service, Shabd Simran Shabd Simran Kaur Adeniji, Fundraising Coordinator The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings® Kundalini Research Institute Email: donations@kriteachings.org Find us on Facebook “The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachingswww.libraryofteachings.com

 

 

The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings® is a non-profit organization and all donations are tax deductible under IRS code 501(c)(3).

 

 


 

 

KRI September Specials of the Month Praana, Praanee, PraanayamPraana, Praanee, Praanayam Exploring the Breath Technology of Kundalini Yoga as Taught by Yogi Bhajan® Compiled from the Teachings of Yogi Bhajan and illustrated by Harijot Kaur Khalsa Praana, Praanee, Praanayam is a collection of Yogi Bhajan's quotes and kriyas gathered from lectures throughout his 35-year teaching career in the West. Yogi Bhajan was a Master of praanic energy, and these quotes and kriyas can help you to understand and experience who you truly are in the universe of praana. Regular Retail: $35.00 Promo: $29.75

 


 

Art & YogaArt & Yoga Kundalini Awakening in Everyday Life by Hari Kirin Kaur Khalsa “The sole purpose of life is the soul.” —Yogi Bhajan Learn to express your soul’s longing, delve into images that awaken your imagination and speak of a truth yet explored. Allow Art & Yoga to take you on a journey to your intuitive, creative, and authentic self—the True Being, awakened! This book is for anyone interested in yoga and the arts. It explains how to create a daily Art and Yoga practice. It provides step-by-step guidelines for producing art and doing yoga as complementary practices individually, in a group, or in community. Yogis will find creative exercises to deepen their experience of yoga, while artists will discover simple, yet profound yoga and meditation practices that will help their creative flow, focus, and intuition. Along the way, we will draw inspiration from the teachings of Yogi Bhajan, nature, artists of the past, and recent developments in healing and spirituality. Retail: $29.95 Promo: $25.46

 


 

Timeless Wisdom from Yogi Bhajan DVD Series 3 Kundalini Yoga Class DVDs and 3 Kundalini Yoga Lecture and Meditation DVDs in two complementary mini series Kundalini Yoga Class Series (These all have yoga sets) Eliminating Inner Anger DVD Eliminating Inner Anger DVD Refining the Spirit DVD Refining the Spirit DVD Angular Body Energy DVD Angular Body Energy DVD Kundalini Yoga Lecture and Meditation Series (These are lectures followed by meditation) Winning Through Trust DVD Winning Through Trust DVD Reaching the Real You DVD Reaching the Real You DVD Discover Your Soul DVD Discover Your Soul DVD Retail: $19.95 per DVD Promo: $16.96
KRI September Recipe of the Month Raita — Two Ways Excerpt From: From Vegetables, With Love: Recipes and Tales from a Yogi’s Kitchen (Revised and Expanded New Edition) Siri-Ved Kaur Khalsa Tamaatar Raita
Raita
Yogurt & Tomato Salad Yield: 6 servings 2–3 Roma tomatoes 1½ cups plain yogurt ½ cucumber 4 green onions, minced ¼ teaspoon cayenne ¼ teaspoon pepper 1 teaspoon ground coriander ½ teaspoon salt ¼ cup minced parsley 2 tablespoons minced fresh mint leaves Blanch tomatoes in boiling water for 1 minute. Remove skins. Cut in half, scoop out seeds (discard), and finely dice. Peel cucumber. Slice in half lengthwise and scoop out seeds (discard), and finely dice. Combine all ingredients. Let sit for 1 hour and serve. Plain and Simple Raita
Raita
Yogurt Dill Salad Yield: 4 servings 2 cups plain yogurt ½ teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon dill weed 2–4 green onions, minced ¼ teaspoon pepper ¼ teaspoon paprika or cayenne 2 tablespoons milk ½ cup crispy brown rice cereal Combine all ingredients. Let sit for an hour or so before serving. About Raita Raita (“RYE-tah) is a yogurt side dish, usually flavored with salt (or black salt) and various combinations of chopped vegetables, parsley, cilantro, and spices. A most basic raita would be yogurt mixed with salt, a little toasted cumin, and minced green onions or fresh dill. Customarily served as part of a spicy Indian meal, a serving of raita helps soothe the stomach and cool the palate. For very best flavor and loving vibes make your raita with homemade yogurt (see How to Make Your Own Yogurt on page 90). For lighter results, dilute with water as desired.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

KRI August Newsletter

 


 


 

A Note From Nirvair Birthday PartySat Nam. Greetings from New Mexico! Our friends and neighbors are joining us to celebrate the birthday, life, and legacy of Yogi Bhajan at Hacienda de Guru Ram Das. If you can get to New Mexico for the evening of August 25th, please come and enjoy the party! We also will be chanting the 2.5 cycle Adi Shakti Mantra, “Ek Ong Kar Sat Nam Siri Wahe Guru,” and the Guru Mantra, “Guru Guru Wahe Guru, Guru Ram Das Guru,” on Yogi Bhajan’s actual birthday which is August 26th. These two mantras are chanted all over the world on Yogi Bhajan’s birthday. If you have not done it before, it is a wonderful experience not to be missed. Check with your local Kundalini Yoga Teacher about the time and place that it will be chanted in your locale. Yogi Bhajan’s teachings are so magnificent that it is easy to forget that he was an actual human being. In many ways, he was just like us - living life as it presented itself to him every day. Here is a story he told about himself, on his birthday, August 26th, 1989.
    “In Amritsar a very perfect scene happened. I was meditating in Harmandir Sahib [the Golden Temple], you know out of reverence you call it that. Out of chance, because we used to go early, we were sitting in the first row. And I felt there was something in my lap, but I didn't move. I didn't care, I was meditating. But there was something warmer on my lap than anything else. That, I understood. The kirtan finished, Ardas [the Sikh prayer], happened and I didn’t stand up [like I should have]. I think they forgave me with the idea that, because I am Siri Singh Sahib and I am a yogi, perhaps I have gone far away so I did not care like a normal person to get up. They forgave me. Finally, it came time for prashad [the sweet food distributed at the end of the Sikh service], and I didn’t move my hands. Now that is something very challenging - that somebody wants to give you prashad, but you don't accept it. Finally he gave the prashad to the person at my side and I slowly start slipping back [to consciousness]. I looked down and there was a beautiful kitten sitting in my lap! I don't know how it came in. I don't know why he selected me, but I was sitting right there with the kitten. I slowly put it to the side. The man who was giving prashad offered me a very big handful of prashad and I took it. Then he said, ‘It must have disturbed you. Sometimes these cats come in and we do not know from where.’ But to me the kitten came to listen to the kirtan. It came to listen to the Ardas. And I had an obligation to my little guest. I was the host. The next day, in the evening … we came back and the head Granthi [clergyman] called to me and said, ‘Yogiji, these days you really have reached God and beyond. I was watching you that day and you never got up, you never even took prashad. You were gone. What a state of ecstasy!’ I said, ‘Thank you, little cat.’”
Visit our online store for digital downloads of your favorite Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan® books and manuals. Now you can have all your teaching materials, including our new Summer Solstice offerings, on your Kindle, iPad, or Computer! We have a special price on a collection of all 38 KRI books and manuals - The Aquarian Collection. Here is a closing class prayer that Yogi Bhajan gave on his birthday, August 26th, 1985. “May God’s grace be with you. May He elevate your consciousness. May your soul shine. May you develop in you the confidence of relationship of the love of God and the grace of your being. May you all walk with confidence. May your body be radiant, your mind be sacred, and your soul victorious. Sat Nam.” I will be with you during the chanting on August 26th! All the best with blessings,

 

Nirvair Singh Khalsa Nirvair Singh Khalsa CEO KRI

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Bali Save the Date KRI August Newsletter
Announcing Level One Kundalini Teacher Training Immersion in Bali 2019
This wonderful immersion training takes place on the blessed tropical island of Bali amidst the indigenous beauty of the people and culture, which is steeped in spiritual and ceremonial tradition. Register early - last year’s Bali Level One Immersion program sold-out!
Registration is open September 15th

 

 

 


 

Yoga and Meditation for Epilepsy - Reducing Excitability by Ishpreet Singh, M.B.B.S. and Sat Bir Singh Khalsa, Ph.D. Yoga and Meditation for Epilepsy Epilepsy is a disorder in which recurrent seizures are caused by abnormal electrical discharges in the brain. A person is diagnosed with epilepsy if they have two unprovoked seizures (or one unprovoked seizure with the likelihood of more) that were not caused by some known and reversible medical condition. There are different types of seizures. Generalized onset seizures affect both sides of the brain or groups of cells on both sides of the brain at the same time. On the other hand, focal onset seizures can start in one area or group of cells in one side of the brain. Epileptic seizures are the result of excessive and abnormal neuronal activity in the cortex of the brain and often brought on by factors such as stress, alcohol abuse, flickering light, or a lack of sleep, among others. An electroencephalogram (EEG) to look for abnormal patterns of brain waves and neuroimaging (CT scan or MRI) to look at the structure of the brain are also usually part of the diagnostic evaluation. In the United States, epilepsy affects an estimated 2.2 to 2.3 million people. The key driver of direct costs in epilepsy is medical service expenditures, which are substantial. However, the overwhelming majority of total costs are attributable to indirect costs such as job absenteeism. For general epilepsy populations, total annual direct healthcare costs per person ranged from $10,192 to $47,862 and epilepsy‐specific costs ranged from $1,022 to $19,749. These costs are a healthcare burden that needs to be addressed. Epilepsy cannot usually be cured outright, but pharmaceutical medications can control seizures effectively in about 70 percent of the cases. The mainstay treatment of epilepsy is anticonvulsant medications, possibly for the person's entire lifespan. Trials of single medications are recommended initially. However, if this is not effective, two medications simultaneously may be prescribed. Medications available include older antiepileptic drugs such as phenytoin, carbamazepine, and valproate and newer ones which include lamotrigine, levetiracetam, zonisamide, etc. Adverse effects from medications are reported in 10 to 90 percent of people. Most adverse effects are dose-related and mild and can include mood changes, sleepiness, or unsteadiness in gait. Certain medications have side effects that are not related to dose such as rashes, liver toxicity, or suppression of the bone marrow. Importantly, up to a quarter of people stop treatment due to adverse effects and some medications are not appropriate during pregnancy. Therefore, there is a need for alternative, nonpharmacological interventions. There is credible and mounting evidence that yoga and meditation practices can improve stress, psychophysiological hyperarousal, and psychological well-being, and may be helpful in treating clinical problems such as depression, anxiety, and chronic pain. The relationship between stress and epilepsy is well known. Stress leads to release of glucocorticoids, neuropeptides, and corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH), which can excite immature hippocampal neurons and cause seizures, resulting in a vicious cycle. A majority of adult patients with medically refractory epilepsies have mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Yoga and meditation interventions may modulate the disturbed limbic system activity in such patients and may help to maintain normal homeostatic conditions. Stress reduction and subjective feelings of well-being may be important factors contributing to seizure reduction and EEG changes ascribed to some forms of meditation. Yoga is thought to achieve seizure control through experience-related plasticity or through a shift in autonomic output toward relative parasympathetic dominance. Other proposed mechanisms of yoga benefit include EEG desynchronization and activation of inhibitory circuits through vagal nerve stimulation. One study has suggested that yoga training stimulates the vagus nerve, which may be relevant because electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve has been shown to decrease seizure frequency by 28 to 38 percent. There is therefore a positive rationale for the therapeutic role of yoga and meditation practices. However, there has been controversy about the link between meditation practice and the neurological disorder of epilepsy. Some have suggested the concern that brain states induced by meditation could be conducive to triggering seizures in epileptics or could trigger epilepsy with patients with no known history or risk factors for epilepsy. The proposed epileptogenic influence of meditation is based on observed meditation-induced alterations in neurophysiology (hypersynchrony and increased coherence of brain activity) and neurochemistry (release of glutamate and serotonin). A study in 1993 found a significantly large incidence of complex partial epilepsy-like signs and experiences in meditators compared to controls. The study presented data of 221 meditators who displayed these signs compared to 860 non-meditators. However, several studies on patients with epilepsy practicing meditation have actually demonstrated improvement in seizure frequency and duration and EEG profile. A study published in 1995 has shown that experiences of unbounded awareness (transcendental consciousness) during meditation are correlated with specific physiological changes, e.g., global increase in EEG coherence, slowing of respiration and heart rate, and increased basal skin resistance. These changes are not epileptic-like and are not pathological but are positively correlated with intelligence, creativity, and mental health. A number of studies have further attested to the safety and efficacy of yoga practices in epilepsy. Two unblinded randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in 1996 and 2008, recruited a total of 50 adults with refractory epilepsy and compared any type of classical Indian yoga to control conditions with no intervention or interventions such as yoga-mimicking exercises or Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. Results of the overall efficacy analysis showed that yoga treatment was better when compared with no intervention or interventions other than yoga. These data also suggested that yoga may have a role as an adjuvant therapy in the management of autonomic dysfunction in patients with refractory epilepsy. A recent review paper on mindfulness-based interventions for epilepsy published in 2017 described three RCTs with a total of 231 participants in the USA (n = 171) and Hong Kong (n = 60). Significant improvements were reported in depression symptoms, quality of life, anxiety, and depression. Despite positive findings, the authors noted significant design limitations including unclear or high risk of bias, low statistical power, lack of measurement of longer-term effects, limited accounting for confounding factors, no measures of home practice, and poor reporting of randomization procedures, adverse events, and reasons for subject drop-outs. This systematic review concluded that there is limited evidence for the effectiveness of mindfulness-based interventions in epilepsy, however preliminary evidence suggests it may lead to some improvement in anxiety, depression, and quality of life. In summary, yoga interventions may contribute positively to the treatment of epilepsy by enhancing quality of life and by decreasing seizure activity. Yoga interventions can be integrated into an outpatient clinic with good results, are noninvasive and low cost, and can be conducted even in the presence of language barriers and cultural differences. However, much more rigorous research needs to be conducted in this field and yoga can only be justified as an adjunctive treatment to antiepileptic drugs at the present time and should not generally be used as the sole treatment method.

 

Ishpreet Singh Ishpreet Singh is a medical doctor and researcher from the Dayanand Medical College in India. He has worked extensively in India and USA with individuals with mental health and neurological disorders and is inclined towards integrating eastern yogic and meditation methods into mainstream medicine. He is an avid practitioner of Kundalini Yoga and meditation and brings this as a tool to help people heal, addressing deeper causes of illness and disease.

 

 

 

Sat Bir Singh Khalsa, Ph.D. Sat Bir Singh Khalsa, Ph.D. is the KRI Director of Research, Research Director for the Kripalu Center for Yoga & Health, and Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. He has practiced a Kundalini Yoga lifestyle since 1973 and is a KRI certified Kundalini Yoga instructor. He has conducted research on yoga for insomnia, stress, anxiety disorders, and yoga in public schools. He is editor in chief of the International Journal of Yoga Therapy and The Principles and Practice of Yoga in Health Care and author of the Harvard Medical School ebook Your Brain on Yoga.

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Sat Nam from The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings® Library of Teachings As many of you know, August is a special time of year for us. Yogi Bhajan’s birthday brings an opportunity to celebrate and remember our beloved teacher. His words and wisdom have given us a technology that transcends time. Here at the at The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings we are working hard to preserve his words in their original form. We are gearing up for our Summer Fundraiser in honor of the birthday of Yogi Bhajan. From August 22nd to 26th, we will be raising money for The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings Endowment Fund. Our endowment is a savings account for the future of the library that, when full funded, will pay for the expenses of preserving the teachings of Yogi Bhajan. It will allow us to continue offering this precious resource, for free, to the future generations of yogis. Stay tuned as we will be sharing the easy ways that you can contribute to the Endowment Fund. “I hope you will give a chance to your future and see your future, and you will put every negative, positive, neutral, nothing, everything into it. So that when your children become people tomorrow, they should pray for you.” Yogi Bhajan, January 7th,1990 As we celebrate his life and the legacy of Yogi Bhajan, remember the infinite ways in which your life has been impacted by these priceless teachings and how they have profoundly changed who you are as a person. As you feel the depth of their impact and see their presence in each day, please consider giving back to the teachings! Your gifts will help build the Endowment Fund to support the Library of Teachings being offered to the world for free… for generations to come. “Guru has laid the path, let us walk it. Let us not serve the lineage, let us serve the legacy” Yogi Bhajan, January 31st, 1993

 

Library of Teachings Donation
In Service, Shabd Simran Shabd Simran Kaur Adeniji, Fundraising Coordinator The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings® Kundalini Research Institute Email: donations@kriteachings.org Find us on Facebook “The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachingswww.libraryofteachings.com

 

 

The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings® is a non-profit organization and all donations are tax deductible under IRS code 501(c)(3).

 

 


 

Chetna Yatra Chetna Yatra Make this your year to experience India – The Guru Ram Das Chetna Yatra Have you longed to travel to India and see the Golden Temple? Make this your year to celebrate the birthday of Guru Ram Das in Amritsar. Join us October 23rd to 28th for the Guru Ram Das Chetna Yatra. Chetna is a beautiful word that means to “awaken.” This yatra will be a trip of seva and devotion to awaken the love of Guru Ram Das in the sangat and in ourselves. “Yatra is a holy journey. We must go into the center, the heart center. It is a journey on earth to one’s ‘Isht’ - one’s higher self, one’s altar. It is a self-purification. So, we go from here to designated holy places and we have no other work but to get up in the morning, to meditate, to go to those beautiful surroundings. Sometimes our mind hassles us, but we do conquer it. This is the purpose of Yatra.” –Yogi Bhajan The schedule of the Yatra will be:
  • On October 23rd and 24th, together with our Kirtan jathas (musical groups), the Yatra will attend programs around Amritsar, the home of Guru Ram Das. Most mornings will be at your leisure for meditating at the beautiful Golden Temple, fantastic shopping, and exploring the city Amritsar.
  • On October 25th, we will join Miri Piri Academy and the huge sangat of Amritsar in the streets for a procession in honor of Guru Ram Das ji. That night, we will attend the famous Raag Kirtan Darbar to hear classical Kirtan, including our own Chardi Kala Jatha.
  • On October 26th, we will celebrate Guru Ram Das’ birthday with tens of thousands of devotees at the Golden Temple. The crowds will be big, and our spirits will be soaring!
  • On October 28th, we will complete the Yatra with Sunday Gurdwara at Miri Piri Academy, tour the campus, and enjoy langar at the school.
This is a very basic and affordable yatra that covers your hotel and transportation around Amritsar. It is a wonderful way to experience Guru Ram Das’ birthday and the Golden Temple with friends and other Kundalini yogis. Join us and awaken to the love of Guru Ram Das.

 

 


 

Raising Children with Virtues and Values – Expect Respect By Jugat Guru Singh Khalsa and Saraswati Kaur Khalsa, Miri Piri Academy. Miri Piri Academy
    “Guru Nanak said, ‘Sat Nam.’ You don't understand Sat Nam. Sat Nam means my name, my identity, my personality, my existence is True. It's a pure truth. He leaves no room for duality, for any reason, for any purpose, whatever that is. His personality was straightforwardly clear that ‘Ek Ong Kar,’ ‘you are the creation of that One.’ One by one, every individual has to be respected. Every existence has to be respected. Every life has to be respected. If you refer to something, you should have not only reference, you should have reverence also.” – Yogi Bhajan, November 8, 1992, Espanola, NM
Reverence is the foundation stone of relationship, not only with other people but to the Divine within. It is the first step on any spiritual path. Without reverence there is no relationship, without relationship there is no reverence! How will our children learn to have respect and reverence? Through the power of our own self-reverence and, in turn, through the respect that we offer to them.
    "Project yourself in one way only. That in God you dwell - you are God's people. Forget about that you are American, forget about that you are even Sikh, forget about that you are a woman, forget about that you are a man, forget about that you are rich, forget about that you are poor, forget about everything about you. But remember one thing about you - that you are purely and basically God's people...Tell all the world, all the living world, that you are God's being. If your children know that you are a divine person, you do not understand how much love, reverence, and respect they will give you." – Yogi Bhajan, July 8, 1981, Espanola, NM
When most of us think about the idea that a child should respect their parents, a lot of our own personal baggage and pain gets in the way. We start to think about whether parents have earned that respect. We remember scenes in which a parent shouts loudly about their authority, demanding obedience. Some remember how they faced physical punishment as a means to teach a lesson. But Yogi Bhajan did not say, “Teach them respect.” Instead, he said, “Expect respect.” Respect comes from your own self-reverence, not from your position of authority or your power over your child. By respecting yourself and your own divinity, you reveal yourself as a person who is worthy of respect. And when you offer them respect, they learn that they too can expect respect. At our most recent Miri Piri Academy graduation ceremony, a student recounted the deep respect that he held for one of the Mukhia Jethadars (dorm parents) at MPA. He shared how at one time he and a roommate had gotten into a physical fight and, after some discussion with their Mukhia Jethadar, a consequence was assigned. He and the other boy were to meet in the afternoon at the sports field to till and flatten the soil. When they arrived at the field, their Mukhia Jethadar was there also. But instead of standing and watching while they worked, he joined them in the hard labor. All afternoon they worked together in the sun until the work was completed. The boys knew that he respected them as much as they were expected to respect him. Miri Piri AcademyThe following meditation, which can be found in the Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings, is a powerful tool in building your own self-reverence and projecting that out to the world. Through the power of our own self-respect, we build the possibility of expecting respect from our children. Meditation: Projection of the Divine in the Self Time: 1 hours and 2 mins. Eyes: Open and focused at the tip of the nose Mantra: Ra Ma Da Sa Sa Se So Hung Date: Jan 20, 1977 This meditation is a powerful projector of the Divine in the Self and originates from a great Mahan Yogi. It may be done with a group of eleven people, which builds a beautiful group energy. Instructions Miri Piri Academy
      1. Sit in a comfortable meditative posture with a straight spine.
      2. Bring the hands palm up in front of the Heart Center.
      3. Cross the right wrist over the left wrist.
      4. Hook the thumbs and fold the fingertips up to meet each other.
      5. The mudra will create a bud-like shape with the thumbs inside the folded fingers.
    Miri Piri Academy
      6. Eyes are open; focused on the tip of the nose.
      7. Deeply inhale and chant the mantra Ra Ma Da Sa Sa Se So Hung, in a monotone, 3 times on the exhale.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Saraswati Khalsa Saraswati Kaur Khalsa is the Assistant Principal of Miri Piri Academy and has been serving there since 2007. She has been a student of Yogi Bhajan since birth and completed her Level One Kundalini Yoga Teacher training under his guidance. Saraswati holds a Master’s Degree in Social Work and has been working with children and schools since 1998. Her daughter also attends Miri Piri Academy as a student.

 

Jugat Guru Singh Jugat Guru Singh Khalsa is the Principal of Miri Piri Academy in Amritsar, India and a KRI Certified Lead Teacher Trainer. From his childhood, he was guided by Yogi Bhajan and has dedicated his life to serving the mission of Yogi Bhajan by helping to shape the next generation into leaders and teachers of this amazing technology. Jugat Guru Singh is a member of the Chardi Kala Jetha, which travels around the world teaching and performing Gurbani Kirtan, including local performances at the Golden Temple.

 

 

 

 


 

 

Yogi Bhajan Raising Children with Values and Virtues 10 Things to Give Your Children
  • Love them.
  • Build their self-esteem.
  • Challenge them.
  • Listen to them.
  • Expect respect.
  • Limit them.
  • Make God a part of their lives.
  • Develop a sense of learning in them.
  • Help them to be community-minded.
  • Let them go.

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

KRI August Specials of the Month The Master’s TouchThe Master’s Touch On Being a Sacred Teacher for the New Age Yogi Bhajan, PhD. Master of Kundalini Yoga This book is for every student of Truth. Whatever path you have chosen, it will give you an understanding of the true meaning of mastery. In this superb collection of teachings from his “Master’s Touch” courses, Yogi Bhajan, one of the most pragmatic spiritual Teachers of our time, explains the path of the Teacher. He does it with wit, compassion, and a practical sense of the challenges of daily life. Retail: $49.95 Promo: $42.46

 


 

The Teachings of Yogi BhajanThe Teachings of Yogi Bhajan The Power of the Spoken Word Yogi Bhajan, PhD This is a book of timeless wisdom transmitted by one of the great teachers of the age. It has the power to make people happy in moments of sadness and to lift their spirits in times of depression. It is a powerful tool to clean the subconscious mind and to replace negative thought patterns with positive ones. Its inner secret is the power of the spoken word. Retail: $15.95 PROMO: $13.56

 


 

Laws of LifeLaws of Life The Teachings of Yogi Bhajan Edited by Hargopal Kaur Khalsa Over the years, Yogi Bhajan outlined hundreds of Laws to live by. This book is a small gem, a collection of Yogi Bhajan quotations and meditations for living a life of joy, kindness and compassion. The law of happiness is, “Let things come to you.” What comes to you will make you happy. What you go after shall make you miserable. -Yogi Bhajan Retail: $14.95 Promo: $12.71

 

Kundalini Yoga with the Master Kundalini Yoga with the Master DVD Series The Kundalini Yoga with the Master DVD Series is your chance to practice a demanding physical kriya with Yogi Bhajan. The all new picture-in-picture guide shows the proper posture and timing while you are challenged to "Keep Up!" by the Master himself. Volume 1: Energize Your System Featured in Owner’s Manual for the Human Body Among other benefits, this kriya contains exercises to: -energize the heart chakra and stomach -give power to the immune system -adjust the spine -cleanse the liver and purify the blood Volume 2: Balance the Vayus Featured in Owner’s Manual for the Human Body There are five principal Vayus: Praana moving in the heart area; Udaana in the throat; Samaana in the navel region; Apaana in the pelvic floor; and Vyaana which circulates throughout the whole body. This set moves all five Vayus of the body and brings equilibrium to the glandular system. Volume 3: For Mental Balance Featured in Owner’s Manual for the Human Body Concludes with Yogi Bhajan playing the gong while you nap. Yogi Bhajan said that by regularly practicing the first and second exercise in this kriya for three minutes each and then repeating frog pose 108 times you can achieve physical and mental health. Volume 4: Optimum Health Featured in Owner’s Manual for the Human Body Refine your radiance with Optimum Health. This physically demanding set is balanced with great moments of relaxation including an 11-minute nap to Guru Ram Das Lullaby and a gong meditation. Volume 5: Automatic Endurance featured in the manual Owner's Manual for the Human Body Let this DVD show you: - Conscious breath for total self-purification - The Power of baby pose - How to develop tolerance, grit and nerves of steel Volume 6: Wake Up the Body to Handle Stress and Strain Featured in the manual Owner's Manual for the Human Body This video contains ideal exercises to do in bed or just out of bed first thing in the morning! Volume 7: Yogic Salutations Featured in the manual Self Knowledge This kriya incorporates a variety of salutations including: - Narda Pranaam - Hans Pranaam - Guru Pranaam Volume 8: Massage for the Lymphatic System Featured in the manual Physical Wisdom Stimulating eliminative movement in the lymphatic system is essential to a strong body and healthy immune system. Give your lymphatic system a massage with this original kriya taught by Yogi Bhajan! All DVDs in this series: Regular Retail: $19.95 per DVD Promo: $16.96 per DVD Or get the entire set for the everyday low “set price” of $119.70 (25% off full retail)
KRI August Recipe of the Month Bring a fiery taste of Summer Solstice back home with you! Summer Quinoa & Veggie Salad Excerpt from: From Vegetables, With Love: Recipes and Tales from a Yogi’s Kitchen (Revised and Expanded New Edition) Siri-Ved Kaur Khalsa
Summer Quinoa & Veggie Salad
Yield: 4–6 servings This healthy, Mediterranean-inspired salad is light but satisfying, and perfect for the warmer summer months. Serve as a small salad or enjoy alone as a meal. Keeps well in the fridge for a few days. 2–3 cups cooked quinoa 4 small Persian cucumbers or 1 large cucumber, chopped into small pieces 1-pint cherry or pear tomatoes cut into halves 1-bunch flat leaf parsley, finely chopped ¼ cup finely chopped fresh mint leaves ¼ cup finely chopped chives or scallions ½ cup feta cheese, crumbled (optional) For the Dressing Extra virgin olive oil Juice of ½ large lemon or full small lemon 2 cloves garlic, minced very fine Salt and pepper to taste Put cooked and cooled quinoa in a large mixing bowl and combine the rest of the salad ingredients. In a separate bowl, mix together dressing ingredients and then pour over salad and toss well. Serving Options: Garnish with chopped avocado, add hemp seeds or nuts of choice, and/or serve atop chopped arugula, raw kale, or mixed lettuces.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

KRI July Newsletter

 


 


 

A Note From Nirvair Summer Sat Nam and warm greetings from New Mexico. Our June KRI Aquarian Trainer Academy Forum was fantastic! Our theme was “Culture, Community, and Communication”. Over 108 trainers attended the workshops and participated in robust discussions. It was inspiring and productive, setting the agenda for the Trainer Forums that will be happening around the world. Look for an Aquarian Trainer Academy Forum near you. 3HO’s Summer Solstice Sadhana Celebration in New Mexico was also a wonderful event. The hot days of White Tantric Yoga and cool evenings filled with stars, music, and friends - there is nothing quite like Summer Solstice! I really enjoyed attending and teaching, seeing the teachers and students who come from around the globe. Are you a teacher of Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan®? Have you ever wondered what inspired some of our Legacy teachers and what they practiced? There is a manual that contains many of the kriyas that Yogi Bhajan taught in the 70’s and 80’s. The manual is called Kriya - Yoga Sets, Meditations, and Classic Kriyas from the early years of Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan®. I have been re-discovering them and teaching these kriyas wherever I have been traveling. Use this tool and combine it with something from the book Blessings – the Power of Prayer, a selection of Yogi Bhajan’s end-of-class prayers, and you have some really great classes to share. Now is the time for Teachers! We still have space available in our International Teacher Training Level One Immersion Program. This challenging time is calling you to serve humanity, and there is no better way to do this than becoming a teacher of Kundalini Yoga. It encourages me to know that a lifetime of service and uplifting students is available to you as an Aquarian teacher. If you are considering that path or you know a student who is considering teaching Kundalini Yoga, there is still time to register for Level One Teacher Training here in New Mexico. If you are in the Aquarian Academy, consider serving as a Trainer In Training. You will find details of the TNT program in this newsletter. Come be with us this August! It is an amazing experience for students and trainers alike. We are diligently working on the Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings searchable database website. Here are two new videos to inspire you to get started with your journey into the library. “Getting to Know Us” and “2018 Current Features Update” All the best with divine blessings,

 

Nirvair Singh Khalsa Nirvair Singh Khalsa CEO Kundalini Research Institute

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Calling All Trainers in Training!

 

Trainer in TrainingAre you in the process of becoming a trainer? Are you available to immerse yourself in the process of personal growth as a trainer? Then the Trainer in Training Program in Espanola this summer will be perfect for you. We want you to join us this summer! In July and August each year, KRI provides a Level One Immersion Teacher Training program in Espanola, NM USA and offers a parallel program in trainer development, fondly called the “TNT Program.” This program is a good opportunity to completely immerse yourself in the process of developing as a trainer. TNTs come from all over the globe to form a community of support for the student teachers. TNTs have come from South Africa, Cambodia, Brazil, Egypt, Mexico, Poland, Canada, Thailand, China, Japan, Israel, Argentina, Germany, Australia, and from across the US. Many TNTs go on to become Lead Trainers and bring Kundalini Yoga Teacher Training to their respective countries. Are you next?! At the Immersion, the TNTs support students through their development into a Level One Kundalini Yoga Instructor while receiving training themselves from KRI Senior Trainers such as Sat Siri Kaur, Siri Neel Kaur, Sat Purkh Kaur, Dev Suroop Kaur, and Nirvair Singh. All of this in New Mexico, the land of enchantment that Yogi Bhajan called “God’s true home.” During the program TNTs participate in all aspects of the training including:
  • Attending a 5-day Training Week with the staff concentrating on developing individual and team growth,
  • Meeting each morning with the TNT Coordinator for support and coaching,
  • Facilitating a group of students from the beginning of the training through certification,
  • Participating in the 2.5 hour “Long Ek Ong Kaar” meditation in honor or Yogi Bhajan’s birthday,
  • Joining people from around the world as we celebrate the Life and Legacy of Yogi Bhajan at the Ranch on Yogi Bhajan’s birthday,
  • Practicing Aquarian Group Sadhana with the students and the sangat of Hacienda de Guru Ram Das, and
  • Being a part of the diverse and experienced Immersion Program Team.
The TNT program is directed by Siri Neel Kaur Khalsa who will coach and mentor you in your development during the Immersion. We have a large Immersion Program this year and are looking for more TNTs to support the program. Click here for more information on the Trainer in Training Program. This is a wonderful opportunity – don’t miss it!

 

 

 


 

Generalized Anxiety Disorder: The Efficacy of Kundalini Yoga By Nikhil Ramburn and Sat Bir Singh Khalsa, Ph.D. Generalized Anxiety Disorder The experience of anxiety, as clinically defined, is a feeling of dread and/or worry that may also be associated with continuing rumination and physical symptoms of the stress response such as rapid heartbeat, perspiration, and muscle tension. When this becomes persistent and heightened in intensity it may begin to meet the criterion of one of the anxiety disorders. Symptoms in anxiety disorders may manifest as panic attacks, feeling overwhelmed and uneasy in social situations, and a variety of possible phobias about specific places or future events. Anxiety is clinically significant if a patient suffers from anxiety symptoms for at least 6 months in any given year, as is the case for 6.8 million adults in the U.S. who suffer from one of the more common forms known as generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Patients with GAD have persistent and excessive worry about a range of different things such as money, health, family, or anticipated disaster when there is no apparent reason for concern. Individuals find it difficult to control their worry. This may be related to past emotional traumas leading to an enlarged and overactive brain region called the amygdala, responsible for emotion and the stress response. When the over-sensitive amygdala is excessively activated, the basal ganglion region of the brain along with the frontal lobe, which are normally responsible for self-regulation, are unable to put the brakes on the amygdala. It is believed that a combination of biological and social factors, particularly stressful life events, play a role in the development of GAD. Although pharmacotherapy is available for GAD patients, many patients remain untreated or are medicated but would prefer alternatives to pharmacotherapy. Prescription drugs that treat anxiety may only be effective at treating the physical symptoms and often carry a high risk for addiction and may severely impair mood, judgment, and cognition. Fortunately, for those patients with the knowledge and access to it, there is a credible behavioral alternative. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) addresses negative thought patterns and cognitive distortions in the way we look at the world and ourselves. The efficacy of CBT for anxiety disorders has strong support from a good body of clinical research trial literature including meta analytic review studies. A growing body of evidence suggests that contemplative practices such as yoga and meditation may also be effective at treating GAD. Indeed, yoga and meditation, through engaging the activity of the attention networks in the frontal lobe, is a form of self-regulation that can inhibit and regulate activity in brain areas, including the amygdala, that are associated with fear and stress-responses. This regulation thereby decreases emotional intensity and perceived stress levels and improves ability to manage everyday stressors and emotional reactions. During mindfulness meditation practices, such as Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR), individuals become less reactive to unpleasant feelings and more reflective, which then leads to positive psychological outcomes. When researchers recently evaluated randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of MBSR interventions, they found that the practice is moderately to largely effective at reducing anxiety and depression symptom severity among individuals with a range of psychiatric conditions. The most comprehensive review to date examined the effects of 209 trials of mind body interventions (MBIs) which included 12,145 patients and found MBIs to be more effective in reducing psychological and medical symptom severity than a number of control conditions. Yoga is one of the MBIs that may offer some advantages to the benefits conferred by meditation alone. Indeed, physical yoga exercises and breathing practices may induce the positive changes in brain neurochemistry that is linked to a more positive mood and affect. Specifically, yoga has been found to increase thalamic GABA levels (a brain neurotransmitter), in a similar fashion to pharmacologic agents acting on GABA levels to alleviate anxiety. Pranayama or yogic breathing may also contribute to the shift towards a dominance of the parasympathetic nervous system (associated with relaxation). Indeed, a recent meta-analysis of eight RCTs of yoga interventions with 319 participants revealed evidence for small, short-term benefits of yoga on anxiety compared to controls. However, in that review, there were no effects found for anxiety disorders that were formally diagnosed. The researchers concluded that “yoga might be an effective and safe intervention for individuals with elevated levels of anxiety” but that “there was inconclusive evidence for effects of yoga in anxiety disorders”. A preliminary clinical evaluation of yoga for GAD was conducted at the outpatient center of Riverside Community Care in the Boston area, in collaboration with Boston University and Harvard Medical School researchers. The results were published in a 2015 paper in the journal Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy. Thirty-two treatment-resistant GAD patients participated in an intervention (Y-CBT) consisting of CBT enriched with Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan®, a yoga style which is adaptable for therapeutic populations (the Guru Ram Das Center for Medicine and Humanology specializes in such applications). The classes in this study included 30 minutes of yoga, meditation, breathing practices (especially long, slow abdominal breathing), and deep relaxation practices. The participants’ post-intervention scores showed statistically significant improvements in anxiety, depression, panic, sleep, and quality of life. The study’s lead author, psychologist Manjit Kaur Khalsa and her colleague Dr. Greiner-Ferris, have recently published a book, The Yoga-CBT Workbook for Anxiety, detailing their strategy to reduce anxiety with a step-by-step six-week program of yoga, meditation, and CBT strategies. The results from this preliminary study suggest that Y-CBT may have potential as a promising treatment for those suffering from GAD. Another more recent publication of a Kundalini Yoga-based study for GAD is currently in press in the International Journal of Yoga Therapy. In that study, forty-nine female participants meeting the DSM-IV criteria for GAD were recruited from the community near the Sundari Satnam Kundalini Yoga Center in Grafton, VT. Both Boston University and Harvard Medical School researchers were part of the study team. The subjects were randomized to either an 8-week Kundalini Yoga intervention or a group receiving treatment as usual. The experimental subjects met for 8 consecutive weeks for 1.25 hours in a group format and received intensive training in Kundalini Yoga kriyas incorporating yoga postures, breathing, mantra, meditation, and relaxation. Results revealed that the participants of the yoga group had lower levels of anxiety relative to control subjects and had a decrease in somatic symptoms. These new findings further support the potential role for the use of Kundalini Yoga as a therapy, in this case for patients with a formal diagnosis of GAD. In summary, there is encouraging preliminary evidence suggesting efficacy of yoga for treating GAD patients, particularly for Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan. However, much research remains to be done and so there is still insufficient evidence to make definitive recommendations about yoga therapy for this condition. More high-quality studies are warranted with larger sample sizes, and the mechanism of action for yoga’s therapeutic benefits in GAD patients needs further investigation. In fact, a ground-breaking NIH-funded, 5-year, multi-site trial that will be concluding soon, is evaluating the efficacy of Kundalini Yoga for GAD as compared to CBT and a psychological attention control condition (see the article: Yoga for Generalized Anxiety Disorder: Design of a Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial. The sample consists of 230 individuals with a primary DSM-5 diagnosis of GAD, 95 of which are receiving a manualized Kundalini Yoga group intervention delivered by local certified Kundalini Yoga instructors supervised by Dr. Sat Bir Khalsa, one of the co-investigators. Stay tuned for future results of this work.

 

Nikhil Rayburn Nikhil Rayburn grew up practicing yoga under mango trees in the tropics. He is a certified Kundalini Yoga teacher and has taught yoga to children and adults in Vermont, New Mexico, Connecticut, India, France, and Mauritius. He is a regular contributor to the Kundalini Research Institute newsletter and explores current yoga research.

 

 

 

Sat Bir Singh Khalsa, Ph.D. Sat Bir Singh Khalsa, Ph.D. is the KRI Director of Research, Research Director for the Kripalu Center for Yoga & Health, and Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. He has practiced a Kundalini Yoga lifestyle since 1973 and is a KRI certified Kundalini Yoga instructor. He has conducted research on yoga for insomnia, stress, anxiety disorders, and yoga in public schools. He is editor in chief of the International Journal of Yoga Therapy and The Principles and Practice of Yoga in Health Care and author of the Harvard Medical School ebook Your Brain on Yoga.

 

 

 

 

 


 

Raising Children with Virtues and Values - Listen To Them By Jugat Guru Singh Khalsa and Saraswati Kaur Khalsa, Miri Piri Academy. SUNIAI - “By deeply listening, one attains Truth, contentment, and spiritual wisdom.” - Guru Nanak Devji - Japji Sahib Miri Piri Academy Yogi Bhajan gave us 10 gifts to give our children and the fourth one is to listen to them. Listening sounds simple, but it is not. Listening requires your own intuition, patience, and parenting skills. At its most basic level, active listening requires focus. In a stressful, fast paced world surrounded by phones, computers, and televisions, even this most basic pre-requisite for listening has become difficult in many homes. This is not something to feel guilty about. We have legitimate reasons for using our phones and computers throughout the day. We have work, emails, schedules, research, shopping, mapping, calls to make, and planning to do. But conscious parenting requires being aware of the impact of all that activity. When we establish healthy boundaries and habits for ourselves, we can be focused and present in our children’s lives. It is not always possible, but if we make listening our priority we can develop the habit of stepping away from work and other distractions to be fully present when our children are trying to communicate. This is the first and most basic step.

“Parents teach their children everything, but they do not teach them three main things. Listen - how to listen. Speak - how to speak. Patience - how to be patient. And a person who doesn't know how to listen, a person who doesn't know how to speak, and a person who doesn't know how to be patient will always suffer. These are three criteria of any success that you want to have in your life.” -Yogi Bhajan, January 20, 1989, Espanola, NM

We need to be willing to focus and have the patience to listen actively, waiting to formulate our own thoughts and responses until after our children are done speaking. We then can reflect back to them what they are saying and ask them thoughtful questions that will help them understand themselves in a deeper way. We are not trying to solve their problems, we are opening a space for them to understand themselves more and to discover their own strength and wisdom. This fits right in with the third gift that Yogi Bhajan recommended, to challenge your children. By opening the space for them to understand and solve their own problems, they are discovering how wise and strong they themselves are. They discover their own intuitive power to recognize the truth and see the way forward.

Children need intuition. To create intuition we should have the patience to listen to them. -Yogi Bhajan, December 28, 2003, Espanola, NM

As every parent knows, children (and adults, also) do not always communicate with words, especially when they are young. And even when they are using words to express their thoughts, emotions, and fears, they may not be clear or conscious of what is truly at the heart of what they are saying or feeling. Active listening, in the classic sense, is the art of waiting to think about our response until the other person is done speaking, reflecting back to them what we heard and checking if we understood them correctly. Yogi Bhajan advocated a deeper level of listening, a patience and consciousness that allows you to reflect back not only what your child is saying, but the frequency of their communication so that you can get to the core of what they are trying to express at the soul level.

How you can relate to your soul? Through your head? No. Through your heart? No. Through you? No. Through your consciousness? Yes, if you are intelligent enough to balance yourself. If you are conscious enough, you will know what chakra a person is talking from, what chakra his frequency is coming through, and as you talk to the other person what chakra frequency you are talking from. If you have the conscious availability of knowing your own frequency through your own chakras, then you are on the path. - Yogi Bhajan Lecture, March 31, 1986 Los Angeles, CA

Very recently I was caring for a 10-year-old girl who often struggled to verbally express herself. She was hurt by something another child had said to her and ran away to the dirt road outside, where she sat silently. It was getting dark, and obviously I was concerned for her safety. I was also tired and ready to relax in bed, but I knew I wouldn’t be able to rush her. I made little headway asking her questions about what she was feeling because she was just not a talker. I made less headway explaining to her the other girl's motivations and reassuring her about how much she was loved. She actually lay down in the dirt and prepared to spend the night on the road! Finally, after an hour, I gave up trying to explain things to her. I didn’t know what to do, so I just sat quietly and decided to recite Kirtan Sohila, the evening Sikh prayer that celebrates the union of the soul with the Infinite. She had never heard the words, and even I didn’t understand the meaning, but as soon as the prayer was done she got up quietly and went to bed. Sometimes listening is a mental exercise, but true listening comes from the soul. Whether you are a parent at home, or a teacher at MPA, you will have hundreds of opportunities every day to model how to listen, how to be patient, how to truly feel and relate to the frequency of another being. Listen to them, and who knows, your child may reflect back and surprise you with intuition and wisdom beyond their young years.

 

Saraswati Khalsa Saraswati Kaur Khalsa is the Assistant Principal of Miri Piri Academy and has been serving there since 2007. She has been a student of Yogi Bhajan since birth and completed her Level One Kundalini Yoga Teacher training under his guidance. Saraswati holds a Master’s Degree in Social Work and has been working with children and schools since 1998. Her daughter also attends Miri Piri Academy as a student.

 

Jugat Guru Singh Jugat Guru Singh Khalsa is the Principal of Miri Piri Academy in Amritsar, India and a KRI Certified Lead Teacher Trainer. From his childhood, he was guided by Yogi Bhajan and has dedicated his life to serving the mission of Yogi Bhajan by helping to shape the next generation into leaders and teachers of this amazing technology. Jugat Guru Singh is a member of the Chardi Kala Jetha, which travels around the world teaching and performing Gurbani Kirtan, including local performances at the Golden Temple.

 

 

 

 


 

 

Yogi Bhajan Raising Children with Values and Virtues 10 Things to Give Your Children
  • Love them.
  • Build their self-esteem.
  • Challenge them.
  • Listen to them.
  • Expect respect.
  • Limit them.
  • Make God a part of their lives.
  • Develop a sense of learning in them.
  • Help them to be community-minded.
  • Let them go.

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Sat Nam from The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings® Library of Teachings Thank you to so many of you who were able to stop by our KRI booth at Summer Solstice last month! We were happy to meet you face-to-face and hear your ideas and appreciation. We are truly humbled. You continue to support the evolution of this resource and we can’t thank you enough! In the month of July we celebrate Independence Day in the United States, a wonderful opportunity for all of us to appreciate the many freedoms we are privileged to live with. Yogi Bhajan gave a lecture July 3rd, 1991 he said;

“4th of July is a wonderful day. It brought us our sovereignty, our independence, our basic values, and we pray that we should not go off-track as humanity. Americans are very unique people. Normally they are a mess, but when they face a message they get together very fast. This is very unique character of Americans. Why? We are from everywhere and we are from nowhere, therefore we love our liberty, our sovereignty, and our land very much..”

He continues,

“Tomorrow is our independence day, by virtue of which we are free, to a certain extent. But I hope the best thing is, we feel free. Still it's a wonderful land compared to other areas and we hope to keep that way. So enjoy your tomorrow, feel good as Americans. Do something nice tomorrow. Do something graceful tomorrow, in gratitude. God gave you freedom, gave you sovereignty, and gave you a great country that you can call home. “

Watch the video of the full lecture to hear more! Another example of how Yogiji’s teachings are timeless, he calls on us to be thoughtful about the next generation, to “not go off track as humanity”. In this time, perhaps more importantly than ever, we must remember our freedoms, our sovereignty, and our ability to effect change for those we are not afforded the same privileges. Thank you again to all of you who give so generously and who have supported this resource from its initial launch just four years ago. There is still so much work to be done to make it a complete resource of all of Yogi Bhajan’s lectures. Thank you for all that you do to support it!

 

Library of Teachings Donation
In Service, Shabd Simran Shabd Simran Kaur Adeniji, Fundraising Coordinator The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings® Kundalini Research Institute Email: donations@kriteachings.org Find us on Facebook “The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachingswww.libraryofteachings.com

 

 

The Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings® is a non-profit organization and all donations are tax deductible under IRS code 501(c)(3).

 

 


 

European Trainer Forum 2018: CHATEAU ANAND

 

NEW Days & Time! European Trainer ForumEuropean Trainer Forum
Thursday, July 26th (12:30pm – 5:30pm) Friday, July 27th (8:30am – 5:30pm) Online Rate until 7/13/18: €184 REGISTER HERE
This year the Trainer Forum will be at Chateau Anand before the European Yoga Festival - by popular demand of the trainers of Europe. The Forum will be held after the Level Three Mela beginning at lunch on Thursday, July 26th, and continue all day on Friday, June 27th. The forum will include time for work on Global Decision Making. Information on accommodations will be made available soon.
*NOTE: Administrators and those needing financial assistance please contact trainerforum@kriteachings.org

 

 


 

What is a Teacher? KRI Level Three Teacher Training Level Three If you are reading this, chances are you are already walking on the path of consciousness and working to improve yourself. You must be serious about your spiritual growth or you wouldn’t be practicing Kundalini Yoga. I mean really, why else would you get up in the early morning to meditate? We have been blessed to receive these teachings from Yogi Bhajan, and for this gift we are grateful. But he often said, “I have not come to collect students, I have come to create teachers.” For the privilege of experiencing the joys of this path, it is our obligation to pass it on to others. As we practice Kundalini Yoga, everyone evolves eventually into a teacher in some form. But what does that mean, to be a teacher? Beyond sitting in front of a yoga class, you are a teacher any time you apply what you have learned to help or sooth the pain of others. No doubt, this is true. But now, through the development of KRI Level Three Teacher Training, we have road-map on how to serve as teacher to the very best of our ability. KRI Level Three is a 1000-day commitment to the process of discovering and refining our authentic identity as a Teacher. It is an amazing and enlightening personal journey to Self-Realization. What are the qualities of a true Teacher in the realm of consciousness? This question was discussed and deliberated by a group of senior Kundalini Yoga teachers in the creation of the Level Three program and they described a Teacher as having these qualities:
  • Ability to penetrate through presence.
  • Well-cultivated wisdom that is beyond knowledge or intellect.
  • Humility to recognize that God is the doer.
  • Spiritual discipline that is in service to our own sacredness.
  • Courage to pursue our highest destiny.
  • Continuous self-improvement through self-reflection.
  • Balance of Shakti and Bhakti.
  • Presence of consciousness in all aspects of our life.
  • Love, kindness, and compassion, seeing God in all.
  • Recognition that we are continually growing and ever evolving.
Are you ready to explore your potential as a Teacher? If your answer is “yes”, then it is time to begin your journey towards Level Three Teacher Training. The application process to join Level Three will open in November 2018. If you are interested, please review the prerequisites here. You may also write to levelthree@kriteachings.org to be added to our prospective Level Three participants email list.

 

Level Three

 

 

 


 

 

July 2018 Specials from KRI From Vegetables, With LoveFrom Vegetables, With Love Recipes & Tales from a Yogi’s Kitchen Rewritten and expanded second edition from Siri-Ved Kaur Khalsa In this completely rewritten and expanded second edition of From Vegetables with Love, you will find over 300 mouthwatering recipes and a wealth of information about the yogic approach to food and diet. You will learn the healing properties of natural foods and herbs, helpful “yogic kitchen tips”, and stories from Siri Ved’s years serving as Yogi Bhajan’s personal chef. Retail: $44.95 PROMO: $38.21

 


 

BlessingsBlessings The Power of Prayer Spoken by Yogi Bhajan The Teachings of Yogi Bhajan This powerful book of blessings and prayers, shared by Yogi Bhajan, provides daily inspirations and guidance for all people of spirit. Read and feel these blessings! They are uplifting, timeless, and universal. Oh Designer, Oh Maker, Oh Guide, Oh Guardian, Oh Energy, Oh Infinite: Give this existence the peace, tranquility, honor and grace to understand and then to live in that understanding for happiness. Sat Nam -Yogi Bhajan Regular Retail: $14.95 Promo: $12.71

 


 

Physical Training Physical Training With Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan® 5 DVD Box Set This 5 DVD set follows Yogi Bhajan teaching Physical Training, (commonly called “PT”) at the Ranch in Espanola on five consecutive days in the summer of ’94. Perfect for establishing a weekly workout with Kundalini Yoga. New inset video demonstrates the posture and timing for each exercise so you can follow along with ease. Original videos have been color corrected and audio has been remastered to help bring the experience alive. Keep up and keep fit! Retail: $39.95 Promo: $33.96
KRI July Recipe of the Month Bring a fiery taste of Summer Solstice back home with you! SOLSTICE HOT SAUCE From: Foods for Health & Healing Remedies & Recipes Based on the Teachings of Yogi Bhajan, PhD Each year, 3HO International holds its Summer Solstice Celebration in Espanola, New Mexico. It is a chance for people to purify their minds, souls, and bodies through Kundalini Yoga and three days of White Tantric Yoga, eating very cleansing food, drinking the purest water, and breathing clean air. As part of the healing diet, this special hot sauce, made with native New Mexican chilies, is always served.
Red Chilies
3 large onions, chopped 1/4 cup dry crushed red chilies 8 oz. tamarind concentrate 16 oz. hot water 1 1/2 cup sesame oil 1 Tbsp. turmeric 10 whole small dry red chilies 2 cups apple cider vinegar Put onions in a large bowl. Sprinkle with crushed chilies. Melt tamarind concentrate in hot water. Add oil and diluted tamarind to onions. Sprinkle with turmeric. Add whole chilies and vinegar. Stir and cover. Let sit overnight or several days for the fullest flavor. Store in refrigerator. It will keep a long time, and get better and better! Yields 2 Quarts

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

KRI June Newsletter

Original photo by Gurumustuk Singh Khalsa

 


 


 

A Note From Nirvair Summer Solstice Sat Nam and greetings from sunny New Mexico. I am getting excited about this summer. There is a lot of activity and opportunity to use the sun energy of these long days to accelerate our yogic and spiritual practices. It really is about having an experience of consciousness. I was just asked by the new ad agency for Yogi Tea about my first class with Yogi Bhajan in 1971. I am very grateful to Yogi Tea, as that company has been a major contributor for helping KRI build the Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings®. I remember the experience of my first class so clearly, feeling more elevated and peaceful than I ever had before. I knew right then that I would spend the rest of my life practicing Kundalini Yoga because my experience was so profound. I decided to become a Kundalini Yoga teacher after my very first class. In a class on April 15th, 1997, right at the conclusion of the kriya, Yogi Bhajan said this…. “You are pretty good these days. You get into it so fast, it's fun! If you desire it, you will have an experience - that's not something I am worried about. Continue to develop the Aquarian person in you. A Piscean person is like this, 'I want to know, take me there.' An Aquarian person is, 'I know. Give me the experience.' You are born by breath, you live by breath, you die by breath, and you experience by breath. There is nothing in you except the breath of life.” Summer Solstice Sadhana in New Mexico is coming June 14th to June 23rd! White Tantric Yoga is a fantastic experience, and there is the unique opportunity to practice three consecutive days of White Tantric Yoga at Summer Solstice. Besides White Tantric Yoga, there are many great classes to attend at Summer Solstice Sadhana. We have KRI staff members as well as many KRI certified teachers and trainers giving classes this year. I will be teaching on June 15th at 1:30 PM. Come say “Sat Nam” to me! Now is the time for Teachers! The planet needs you now more than ever. We still have space available in our International Teacher Training Level One Immersion Program. The Aquarian Age is calling, and you can become a Teacher of Kundalini Yoga as taught by Yogi Bhajan® this summer. Did you see the Spring Fund drive for the Yogi Bhajan Library of Teachings? It was all about the gong with lots of information about technique and clips of Yogi Bhajan playing the gong in class. It was a big success, and I offer a sincere “Thank You” to all of our donors. We will keep making this invaluable resource better and better with your help. Wishing you all the best and a very Happy Solstice!

 

Nirvair Singh Khalsa Nirvair Singh Khalsa CEO KRI

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Join Us for the International Summer Solstice Sadhana Trainers Forum – Culture, Communication, and Community

 

Trainers ForumThe Trainers Forum at Summer Solstice is almost upon us! It will be held at the Langar Hall at beautiful Hacienda de Guru Ram Das. We have a spectacular line-up of presenters and workshops just for you! Members of the Aquarian Trainer Academy, applicants, those considering applying, and all contract administrators are invited and encouraged to attend. This is an exciting event and is the beginning of the annual cycle of Forums around the world. The discussions are always engaging and illuminating. The Academy has over 700 members from 50 countries. Come meet your fellow trainers and participate in the ongoing evolution of the Academy and all three levels of The Aquarian Teacher®. Wednesday, June 13th (12:30pm – 5:30pm) Thursday, June 14th (8:30am – 5:30pm) Register Here for the Summer Solstice Sadhana 2018 Trainers Forum. Don’t miss it!

 

 

 


 

Camp Miri Piri

 

Do you want to immerse yourself in Sikh Dharma? Camp Miri Piri is for you!
Camp Miri Piri

 

As a practitioner of Kundalini Yoga, are you interested in learning about and having a deep experience of Sikh Dharma? If so, Camp Miri Piri is for you! Camp Miri Piri is for and about Sikhs – four days of sharing the spiritual warrior experience. The camp is a celebration and a dedication to Guru Hargobind, the sixth Sikh Guru, who started the warrior tradition in Sikhism. He wore two swords, naming them “Miri” and “Piri”. These swords represented the balance between spiritual and worldly powers. This concept of the warrior-saint has permeated the Sikh philosophy and lifestyle ever since. The goal of Camp Miri Piri is to challenge you to connect to your soul in a deep way. Here you will find recitation of the five morning Banis, a powerful group Sadhana, challenging physical training, and inspiring Sikh stories and meditation. You will gain an in-depth experience of Sikh values by balancing the mind, body, and spirit through the practice of Gurbani Kirtan, Kundalini Yoga, meditation, and warrior workouts, as well as classes to build healthy relationships. Two Camp Miri Piri experiences are coming. Click the links for more information about these camps.
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